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Free geneaolgy advisory service 2014

GAS TALKS 894x1024 Free geneaolgy advisory service 2014

Dublin can be Heaven

Throughout the year, the National Library of Ireland (NLI) offers a genealogical advisory service through its dedicated staff, Francis Carroll and Christina McDonnell.  To cope with summer’s  influx of extra visitors this service is augmented during these busy  months.  Once again this year, Eneclann and Ancestor Network were successful in winning the tender for this service.

Drawing on personnel from both Eneclann and Ancestor Network, our team worked Monday through Saturday at the Library, meeting all comers. We have striven to enhance the welcoming space offered to family historians by the National Library of Ireland. With an increase of over 10% in visitor numbers to Ireland in 2014, it has been a busy summer for all. My own experience in the Library began five years ago and in this time I have observed a change in the demand for this service. With so many records now digitised, often times it has been a matter of guiding visitors through the myriad of records now online.

We have introduced overseas visitors to websites they may not yet have encountered, such as irishgenealogy.ie,www.findmypast, and dublinheritage.ie . For many this was just the impetus they needed to continue their searching long after their departure from our shores.  Frequently, visitors arrive at the Library on the last day of their holiday and are very pleased to know they can continue their searches online. What has not changed over the last five years is the great hunger that exists amongst people to trace their family. The interest in this area continues to grow and we are delighted play our part in this developing field. One of the pleasures of working in the Library is meeting generations of the one family who, drawing on combined skills in the area of oral history with the application of computer know-how, can really make progress in tracing their family history.

It is always a delight to be on hand when a discovery is made and to reconnect people with earlier generations of their family. In addition to our participation in the NLI’s Genealogical Advisory Service, this year has seen the runaway success of the Twentyx20 lunchtime talks during the month of August.  The brainchild of Eneclann’s Research Direct Fiona Fitzsimons, this series of free talks drew on a wide range of speakers. Visitors to the Library have been treated to a cornucopia of experts.

Family history is a very broad church and the range of speakers assembled by Fiona Fitzsimons is testament to this. Throughout all this activity our team has been graciously hosted and welcomed by the NLI’s staff in the handsome setting of the National Library. For this Dubliner, entering the portals of our National Library, to work as part of this team, I know that Dublin can, indeed, be heaven

By, Eneclann research expert,

Carmel Gilbride.

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We hope you are enjoying the Free Genealogy Service inThe National Library of IrelandthatEneclannandAncestor Network continue to provide each day this Summer, With such a wide and Comprehensive range of expertise from our experts all summer we aim to help anyone looking for help and advice in tracing their family history.

The service is free to all visitors of the Library.

9.30 a.m. to 4.45 p.m. Monday to Friday,

9.30 a.m. to 12.45 on Saturdays.

 

The Twenty-20 Lunch-time talks come to an end.

themed image 2 1024x685 The Twenty 20 Lunch time talks come to an end.

The Twentyx20 series for 2014 concluded last Friday, with a talk by Damian Shiels on the Irish in the American Civil War.

 The series proved very popular again in 2014, and consistently brought in a large audience to the Library. The success of theTwentyx20 series comes from its’ simple format.

There are twenty talks, each of which lasts 20 minutes.

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  Every talk is followed by a Q&A session where the audience gets to pitch questions directly to the experts.

Each talk is a stand-alone piece aimed at entertaining and informing.

The twenty talks given in August, go towards creating a month-long programme intended to unlock the richness and diversity of Irish Family History.

Family history is a multi-disciplinary subject, and the diversity of professional backgrounds on show during the month proved this.  Our speakers included archaeologists, archivists and museum curators, geographers, historians, geneticists, theologians, and experts in women’s studies and I.T.

A huge thank you to all of our speakers in August – to the locals who walked, bussed or biked in; to those that travelled further afield from Limerick, Cork, Waterford, L’derry; and to the overseas speakers who flew in to Dublin to speak at the National Library of Ireland.

Finally, we owe a huge debt to Honora Faul of the National Library for her help and cheerfulness throughout the month.

free talks fb 1024x781 The Twenty 20 Lunch time talks come to an end.

During September, we intend to construct a page on the Eneclann blog, to provide an overview of all the talks that inspired you in the Twentyx20 series. We’ll let you know when it’s ready to view, through thenewsletter.

Stay tuned icon wink The Twenty 20 Lunch time talks come to an end.

TALKS COLLAGE 1024x699 The Twenty 20 Lunch time talks come to an end.

Latest Eneclann Newsletter, 13th August 2014

Meeting Princess Charlene in the Palace in Monaco

 

Last Winter Tourism Ireland commissioned Eneclann research director Fiona Fitzsimons to research the Irish family history of Princess Charlene of Monaco.

“At the outset, I had no preconceived ideas of what I might find during research”

The Fagan family history.

The Princess’s Irish ancestors were the Fagan family, probably the most successful gentleman-merchants in Dublin in the 1500s and 1600s. The Fagans were wealthy entrepreneurs, who left an indelible mark on the landscape of Dublin city and its’ environs.

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The Fagans owned Bulloch Harbour from the 1580s until 1692.
Bulloch Harbour was the deep-sea port for the city of Dublin, and was the source of the Fagan’s immense wealth and influence.

They were involved in the foundation of Trinity College in 1592, and the Phoenix Park in 1662.

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The Phoenix Park Dublin. In 1662 Christopher Fagan sold his Manor of Phoenix to the Duke of Ormond, to create a Royal Deer Park.
Photo courtesy Tourism Ireland.

The Fagans fought on the losing side in the Battle of the Boyne, and in 1692 were outlawed and their lands confiscated.  Under the peace terms that ended that War, the Fagans should have been pardoned and given back their lands.  Lord Thomas Coningsby, a corrupt senior government official manipulated the legal system and seized the Fagan’s extensive Dublin estates.

In 1695 the Fagans re-located to Killarney County Kerry, and over generations re-established themselves as merchants, trading out of Cork with the American Colonies and the West Indies.

The last of Princess Charlene’s direct ancestors born in Ireland was Christopher Sullivan Fagan, born in March 1781.  In 1800 at the age of 18 Christopher enlisted as a cadet in the East India Company.

On arrival in India, young Christopher Sullivan Fagan discovered an important family connection that gave him a direct link to the English Governor General.  Christopher’s first cousin, Hyacinth Rolande, was married to Richard Wellesley, Governor General of India 1797-1805.

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Hyacinthe Rolande, natural daughter of the Chevalier Fagan. Portrait painted 1791 by Elisabeth le Brun.
Reproduced courtesy of the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco

Christopher Sullivan Fagan rose to the rank of Major General in the Honorable East India Company Service (H.E.I.C.S.).  One of his daughters was Agnes Cecilia Adelaide Fagan born in Bengal in 1821; married in Calcutta in 1842 to Charles Arthur Nicolson.

These are Princess Charlene’s great x 3 grandparents, and it was their generation that first established a connection to Africa.

———————————————————————-
Meeting a Princess.
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From L-R: Prince Albert; Princess Charlene; Finola O’Mahony, head of Europe; Tourism Ireland,Rory Montgomery Irish ambassador to France; and Fiona Fitzsimons of Eneclann.
Earlier this Summer I was asked if I could travel to Monaco, to present the Princess’s family history.  The meeting was eventually scheduled to take place in the Palace gardens at 6pm on Tuesday 29th July.  Rory Montgomery the Irish ambassador to France, and Finola O’Mahoney of Tourism Ireland would also be there.

A gathering storm on the afternoon of the 29th meant that on our arrival at the Palace, we were shown into a private family sitting room.  It was a lovely room, comfortable and domestic, where I felt at ease.  The surfaces teemed with family photographs, including rather surreally, the late Princess Grace of Monaco.

The princely couple arrived with little or no fanfare and after introductions we sat and I described to them some of the personalities of the Princess’s Irish ancestors, and their exploits across three continents.

In the course of our conversation the couple’s interest rose higher and higher, and they asked very many questions to fix key details.  We talked for over an hour, and towards the end of the interview Princess Charlene asked with obvious delight if Ireland would now claim her as one of our own.

The Irish ambassador answered in the affirmative, presenting the Princess with a Certificate of Irish Heritage.

On the way home, I got a taxi from Dublin Airport and mulled it all over.  It occurred to me that even behind a palace wall, a Princess can be as delighted as a child on Christmas morning, to discover her Irish heritage.

by Fiona Fitzsimons
______________________________________

Click on the link below and have a listen to a short clip of Fiona’s interview on the research of  Princess Charlene.

Radio Riviera News clip

 

 


Lunch time talks in NLI so far.

 

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The Twentyx20 Lunch-time talks are proving very popular with numbers of over 50 each day.

What’s great to see this year is that it’s not just the same familiar faces, we’re reaching a fresh audience interested in family history.

On Tuesday the 5th of August,Catherine Murphy T.D. attended. She was enthused to see such a large crowd in the Library to attend the talks.

Reviews

On Friday the 1st of August, Brian Donovan spoke about the digital revolution in Irish family history.  Since 2003, over 120 million historic Irish records have been digitised and published online.  Brian gave an overview of the key collections online for genealogy research. He discussed the trail-blazing “Partnership Model” adopted by findmypast, that ensures the rights of data-owners (of records).
Online publishing has improved access to the records; made research easier; and transformed genealogy from a minority pursuit into a popular hobby with a mass audience.

On Tuesday the 5th of August, in a delightfully witty and wise talk, Patrick Comerford informed us there’s more to parish records than registers. Parish records tell us more about our religious identity and social conditions in the past.  The records
also show that Ireland was a pluralist society beforeNe Temere.Family history has become main-stream because in the modern world, we use it to construct our own personal identity.

For anyone who missed Patrick’s talk last Tuesday, but who would like to hear more of his ideas on family history, See

http://www.patrickcomerford.com/search/label/Family%20History

Reviews for speakers from the 6th of August will be included in our next newsletter.

There are still so many wonderful talks to come, here is a preview of  the week to come (11th to 15th)

Monday 11thPaul McCotter,N.U.I Cork,Researching the history of Irish surnames and clan-names.

Tuesday 12thElse Churchill,Society of Genealogists,The exile of Erin, researching the poor Irish in Victorian London

Wednesday 13thAudrey Collins,National Archives U.K,Under-used Irish records in the National Archives in England

Thursday 14thHilary McDonagh,Ancestor Network,Genealogy and sporting records-from sporting Laurels to Family Trees.

Friday 15thJacinta Prunty,N.U.I Maynooth,Did you come from Dublin dear? Understanding Dublin city through maps.

0e746fc1 6abf 43a7 a38f df94e41c1f47 Latest Eneclann Newsletter, 13th August 2014

 

 


Free genealogy advisory service

 

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The joint consortium ofEneclann andAncestorNetwork continues to provide a wide and comprehensive range of expertise in The National Library of Ireland all summer to anyone looking for help and advice in tracing their family history,

The service is free to all visitors of the Library.

9.30 a.m. to 4.45 p.m. Monday to Friday,

9.30 a.m. to 12.45 on Saturday.

See you there!

 

 


National Heritage Week.

 

7eb08cc3 0fbd 42b7 977b fcccdce69b1b Latest Eneclann Newsletter, 13th August 2014 Venue:Dublin City Library and Archive.Address:144 Pearse Street, Dublin, Ireland.

Is Booking Required:No.

Admission Fee:Free.

JoinfindmypastandEneclann for a free family history beginner’s day. On the day you can expect

Free access to records on findmypast.
Demonstrations on how to use the online records.
Genealogy advice.
Short introductory lectures.
Every hour during the event you can attend talks from our experts about all things family history. Here’s how the lectures are scheduled:

TimeTopicLecturer
12pmWhere to start when building your family treeFiona Fitzsimons,
Eneclann
1pmCensus, land and birth marriage and death records – the building blocks of Irish family historyBrian Donovan, Eneclann
2pmAdd some colour to your family tree with military, crime and newspaper recordsAoife O’Connor, findmypast
3pmTracing your ancestors who moved abroadCliona Weldon, findmypast

 


The Genealogy Event

What better way to celebrate Limerick’s status as 2014 City of Culture, and the start of National Heritage week, than with

The Genealogy Event!
This two day event promises to be a real humdinger!

Information sessions on a broad range of Irish genealogy topics will be given by some of the top experts in the industry. The Eneclann duo, Fiona Fitzsimons and Brian Donovan will also be there icon wink Latest Eneclann Newsletter, 13th August 2014

“The event has been set up to help genealogists and family historians at all levels and bring together people from around the world with Irish roots,” says BBNY Group founder, Bridget Bray.

Introductory and advanced sessions will focus on surname origins, genetics and genealogy, civil, church and military records.

For those who really want to dig deep, there are expert sessions on the Registry of Deeds, and Irish sources for children in care 1840s to 1990s.

The U.S.National Archives (NARA) will also make a rare appearance in Ireland, to introduce the use of U.S. immigration and Naturalization records.

Have a listen below toLyric FM, as they promote the event with an ad.

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The Genealogy Event 2014.

 


Research Tip of the week!

I’m constantly surprised by the number of people undertaking genealogical research who have their notes written on the backs of envelopes, scraps of paper etc.  My tip for this week is get yourself a sturdy notebook (ring-bound notebooks eventually disintegrate),  and record all your family history details in there.  When you do come across any information relevant to the family always note the place e.g., NAI (National Archives of Ireland), GRO (General Register Office), date, and all the relevant details. For example if you searched the baptismal register for Mallow, record the exact years you looked at, any relevant baptism to your family, and the positive number of the microfilm in the National Library of Ireland.  I recently spoke to someone who had been searching for 12 years for estate records he had previously seen that related to his family.  He hadn’t written down the manuscript number or where exactly he had seen them. We did eventually find the correct estate records but it’s a salutary lesson!

 

By Helen Moss,

resident research expert,

Eneclann.
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The Celtic Connections Conference 2014

994c406d 77b6 4b13 af4f 6e209529592a  The Celtic Connections Conference 2014

Eneclann’s very own Brian Donovan heads state side for the Celtic Connections conference this August!

This August the 15th and 16th our very own expert Brian Donovan will be heading to the Celtic Connections Conference in Waltham, Massachusetts to join all the leading experts in genealogy from near and far, Brian will be speaking on the following topics:

Usingfindmypast.com to Trace your Irish Family History.

Murderer, rebels and Drunkards: Your Irish ancestors and the Law.

This two day event will include 20+ lecturers and 26 presentations by well-known experts in their respective fields, such as:

John Grenham
Eileen Ó Dúill
Sean Ó Dúill
Kyle Betit
 Dwight Radford
Donna Moughty
Bill Budde

   and many more!

Go towww.celtic-connections.org now for all you need to know on this great event.

Meeting Princess Charlene in the Palace in Monaco

Last Winter Tourism Ireland commissioned Eneclann research expert Fiona Fitzsimons to research the Irish family history of Princess Charlene of Monaco.

“At the outset, I had no preconceived ideas of what I might find during research”

The Fagan family history.

The Princess’s Irish ancestors were the Fagan family, probably the most successful gentleman-merchants in Dublin in the 1500s and 1600s. The Fagans were wealthy entrepreneurs, who left an indelible mark on the landscape of Dublin city and its’ environs.

13. PD 2087 TX 53 Dalkey harbour with castle and martello tower and distant view of Dublin bay 001 Meeting Princess Charlene in the Palace in Monaco

Bulloch Harbour in Dalkey county Dublin

They were involved in the foundation of Trinity College in 1592, and the Phoenix Park in 1662.

7. Phoenix Park Meeting Princess Charlene in the Palace in Monaco

The Phoenix Park Dublin. In 1662 Christopher Fagan sold his Manor of Phoenix to the Duke of Ormond, to create a Royal Deer Park.
Photo courtesy Tourism Ireland.

 

The Fagans fought on the losing side in the Battle of the Boyne, and in 1692 were outlawed and their lands confiscated.  Under the peace terms that ended that War, the Fagans should have been pardoned and given back their lands.  Lord Thomas Coningsby, a corrupt senior government official manipulated the legal system and seized the Fagan’s extensive Dublin estates.

In 1695 the Fagans re-located to Killarney County Kerry, and over generations re-established themselves as merchants, trading out of Cork with the American Colonies and the West Indies.

The last of Princess Charlene’s direct ancestors born in Ireland was Christopher Sullivan Fagan, born in March 1781.  In 1800 at the age of 18 Christopher enlisted as a cadet in the East India Company.

On arrival in India, young Christopher Sullivan Fagan discovered an important family connection that gave him a direct link to the English Governor General.  Christopher’s first cousin, Hyacinth Rolande, was married to Richard Wellesley, Governor General of India 1797-1805.

 

11.A303252 LeBrun Meeting Princess Charlene in the Palace in Monaco

Hyacinthe Rolande, natural daughter of the Chevalier Fagan.
Portrait painted 1791 by Elisabeth le Brun.
Reproduced courtesy of the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco.”

Christopher Sullivan Fagan rose to the rank of Major General in the Honorable East India Company Service (H.E.I.C.S.).  One of his daughters was Agnes Cecilia Adelaide Fagan born in Bengal in 1821; married in Calcutta in 1842 to Charles Arthur Nicolson.

These are Princess Charlene’s great x 3 grandparents, and it was their generation that first established a connection to Africa.

———————————————————————————

Meeting a Princess.

Princess Charlene 1024x658 Meeting Princess Charlene in the Palace in Monaco

The Phoenix Park Dublin. In 1662 Christopher Fagan sold his Manor of Phoenix to the Duke of Ormond, to create a Royal Deer Park.
Photo courtesy Tourism Ireland.

 

Earlier this Summer I was asked if I could travel to Monaco, to present the Princess’s family history.  The meeting was eventually scheduled to take place in the Palace gardens at 6pm on Tuesday 29th July.  Rory Montgomery the Irish ambassador to France, and Finola O’Mahoney of Tourism Ireland would also be there.

A gathering storm on the afternoon of the 29th meant that on our arrival at the Palace, we were shown into a private family sitting room.  It was a lovely room, comfortable and domestic, where I felt at ease.  The surfaces teemed with family photographs, including rather surreally, the late Princess Grace of Monaco.

The princely couple arrived with little or no fanfare and after introductions we sat and I described to them some of the personalities of the Princess’s Irish ancestors, and their exploits across three continents.

In the course of our conversation the couple’s interest rose higher and higher, and they asked very many questions to fix key details.  We talked for over an hour, and towards the end of the interview Princess Charlene asked with obvious delight if Ireland would now claim her as one of our own.

The Irish ambassador answered in the affirmative, presenting the Princess with a Certificate of Irish Heritage.

On the way home, I got a taxi from Dublin airport and mulled it all over.  It occurred to me that even behind a palace wall, a Princess can be as delighted as a child on Christmas morning, to discover her Irish heritage.

By Fiona Fitzsimons.

Free Lunch-time talks kick off at the National Library of Ireland

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The Twentyx20 lunch times talks kick off tomorrow, with our very first expert speaker Brian Donovan, The talk will take place at 1.05pm in the National Library of Ireland and is free to anyone who would like to attend, Brian’s talk will be on “Delivering the digital revolution in Irish Family History”

We hope to see you there. icon smile Free Lunch time talks kick off at the National Library of Ireland

http://www.eneclann.ie/2014/05/the-return-of-the-twentyx20-lunch-time-talks/

Princess Charlene

Fiona Fitzsimons on Riviera Radio News regarding Princess Charlene report

 

While the ancestries of Prince Albert II and his mother, Princess Grace , are well known, Research commissioned by Tourism Ireland and carried out by genealogy researcher Fiona Fitzsimons of Eneclann has revealed that Princess Charlene’s ancestors can be traced all the way back to the 1520s and to a prominent Dublin family called the Fagans.

Click on the link below and have a listen to a short clip of Fiona Fitzsimons of Eneclann who conducted the research on Riviera Radio

Radio Riviera News clip

Princess Charlene

Eneclann trace Princess Charlene’s Irish ancestors back to 16th century Dublin

Princess Charlene 1024x658 Eneclann trace Princess Charlene’s Irish ancestors back to 16th century Dublin

From L-R: Prince Albert, Princess Charlene, Finola O’Mahony, head of Europe,Tourism Ireland,Rory Montgomery irish ambassador to France and Fiona Fitzsimons Eneclann Director and Expert researcher.

Eneclann have researched and prepared a family tree tracing Princess Charlene’s descent through her paternal grandmother back an amazing sixteen generations all the way back to the 1520’s

On Tuesday 29th July, at the invitation of Tourism Ireland, renowned genealogist Fiona Fitzsimons met Princess Charlene of Monaco to discuss the exploits and personalities of her Irish ancestors – the Fagans of Feltrim (co. Dublin) and later of Killarney (co. Kerry). The Princess was also presented with a Certificate of Irish Heritage by HE Rory Montgomery, Irish Ambassador to France, at the palace in Monaco, which was also attended by Prince Albert.

Research commissioned by Tourism Ireland and carried out by genealogy researcher Fiona Fitzsimons of Eneclann has revealed that Princess Charlene’s ancestors can be traced all the way back to the 1520s and to a prominent Dublin family called the Fagans.

From 1524, over 16 generations, the Fagans were involved in key events in Irish History and left an indelible mark in the Irish landscape – including Christ Church Cathedral, Trinity College and the Phoenix Park.

In the 1500s the Fagans became immensely wealthy through international commerce. They reinvested their profits in lands close to the capital, and provided finance to the Irish crown government.  By the early 1600s the Fagans controlled more than 5000 acres in Dublin County, including the city’s deep-water port at Bulloch Harbour in Dalkey.

 

Fiona Fitzsimons said: “I met with the Princely couple in the Palace, and described how the Princess’s Fagan ancestors made their mark on Irish history. They received the presentation with great enthusiasm and asked many many questions. Princess Charlene is delighted that Ireland has claimed her as their own”

“It’s a great story about the Irish Capacity to adapt in extreme circumstances and reinvent themselves”

The Irish Heritage Certificate is an initiative, which was introduced in September 2011 and is open to anyone born outside of Ireland with an Irish ancestor. It is an official recognition by the Irish Government of those who are proud of their Irish ancestry and heritage.

 

Latest Eneclann Newsletter 25th July 2014

logo Latest Eneclann Newsletter 25th July 2014
In this issue:

Celtic Connections Conference 2014.

The Genealogy event Limerick.

Lunch time talks in the National Library.

Free Genealogy advisory service 2014.

Research Tip of  the week.

Carmel Gilbride unlocks the past for passengers


 

 

The Latest Eneclann Newsletter………

The Celtic Connections Conference 2014

 

994c406d 77b6 4b13 af4f 6e209529592a Latest Eneclann Newsletter 25th July 2014 Eneclann’s very own Brian Donovan heads state side for the Celtic Connections conference this August!

This August the 15th and 16th our very own expert Brian Donovan will be heading to the Celtic Connections Conference in Waltham, Massachusetts to join all the leading experts in genealogy from near and far, Brian will be speaking on the following topics:

Usingfindmypast.com to Trace your Irish Family History.

Murderer, rebels and Drunkards: Your Irish ancestors and the Law.

This two day event will include 20+ lecturers and 26 presentations by well-known experts in their respective fields.

such as:
John Grenham
Eileen Ó Dúill
Sean Ó Dúill
Kyle Betit
 Dwight Radford
Donna Moughty
Bill Budde
and many more!

Go towww.celtic-connections.org now for all you need to know on this great event.


The Genealogy Event Limerick

The countdown is on to The Genealogy Event in Limerick with only 5 weeks to go, If you are planning a trip to Ireland or a trip to Limerick then The Genealogy Event is one not to be missed, It will take place on the 22nd and 23rd of August, The two day event will bring you presentations by the experts in genealogy along with other social events that will help attendees meet one another in relaxed settings.

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 Dont forget to look out for our very own Eneclann duo, Fiona Fitzsimons and Brian Donovan who will also be there to give their expert advise icon wink Latest Eneclann Newsletter 25th July 2014

Phone: +353 61 331549

Email:info@bbnygroup.com

Web:www.thegenealogyevent.com

Tickets may be purchased online via thebuy tickets here button or

contacting Event Partner, the Irish Ancestry Research Centre on +353 61 207 114

 


Lunch Time talks in the National Library

This August at theNational Library of Ireland,Eneclann andAncestor Network will host a feast for family history fans! It’s the return of the Twentyx20 lunch-time talks.Each talk is a short introduction to a key area, source or research method in Irish family history. The Q&A session will give you direct access to the experts.

0e746fc1 6abf 43a7 a38f df94e41c1f47 Latest Eneclann Newsletter 25th July 2014

Free Genealogy advisory service in the National Library of Ireland 2014

9c6ddcb9 9cfb 41ae 8c5a 0d306e6b21f3 Latest Eneclann Newsletter 25th July 2014 The joint consortium ofEneclannandAncestorNetworkare providing a wide and comprehensive range of expertise in The National Library of Ireland all summer to anyone looking for help and advice in tracing their family history,

The service is free to all visitors to the Library.

9.30 a.m. to 4.45 p.m. Monday to Friday,

9.30 a.m. to 12.45 on Saturday.

See you there!


Eneclann helps Unlock the Past for Cruise ship Passengers

69d52a56 cdac 4a94 aef5 5371a58d59a4 Latest Eneclann Newsletter 25th July 2014

5e74e7ad 45ff 4838 9941 0479cec435b9 Latest Eneclann Newsletter 25th July 2014 This morning in theNational Library of Ireland,
Eneclann research expert Carmel Gilbride, gave a talk on migration to Australia to the cruise ship passengers ofUnlock the Past cruises, Carmel also shared her expert advise and answered questions and queries that the Australian passengers had regarding their Irish Family history, the cruise ship passengers used the library to seek out all the information they wanted through out the morning and with the help of Carmel they hopefully unravelled some mysteries.


Research Tip of the week

It may be that we think we have mined everything we can about our families from the 1901 and 1911 Census. But a few recent searches have had me re evaluate this idea.

It can be so difficult to select the correct family when the name is one that proliferates. It seems, at the outset to be impossible.
But along the way, we may establish a county of birth and that can narrow down our search.

Then we may learn an occupation and this can be really key in selecting the correct record.  But, even at that point, – given the proliferation of labourers in Ireland’s economy of the opening decades of the 20th century – we can be still be faced with a choice.Great care is needed at this point to ensure we do not dismiss records from our search.

We might expect to find, the pairing of say a husband and wife, the parents of children we have found. But, we should be mindful of the fact that one or other parent may have died and remarried. Pay particular attention, in the 1911 Census, to the number of years married.

If the wife indicates that she has been married for ten years, yet there are persons listed as children as the head of household who are older than ten, then you have to dig deeper.

The children {of whatever age} are correctly enumerated as the offspring of the head of household. But these children are not necessarily the children
of his wife.
If you are very fortunate, the second marriage of this head of household may be civilly registered, where his first marriage was not. In this way, you may be able to bring a family back, through following the clues in the census, to an earlier generation.

Carmel Gilbride,
Research Expert,

1ee73ce9 b1f4 4ff1 8548 bbcc50baea26 Latest Eneclann Newsletter 25th July 2014

 

 


—————————————————
Best wishes, The Eneclann Team

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FINALGeorge Clooney's Kilkenny connection p1 and 2-1

George Clooney’s Kilkenny Connections

Using newly available records on www.findmypast.ie renowned genealogist Fiona Fitzsimons discovered Clooney’s Irish ancestors didn’t jump, but were pushed.

Clooney’s Irish ancestors were small farmers from Windgap, co. Kilkenny. In the 1850s local farmers competed for land.
This sometimes tipped-over into violence. New evidence proves that in 1852 Nicholas Clooney (George’s great x 2 grandfather) was violently assaulted. Months later he was harrased through the court system.

“In 1852 Nicholas Clooney suffered a real injustice. He decided shortly after to leave Ireland and settle in Kentucky. The rest is history.” Says Fiona.

Research showed that Nicholas’s widowed mother (George Clooney’s great x3 grandmother) remained behind in Ireland.
“Now through a family connection and for the first time, we have photographs of the old Clooney house and farm taken in the 1930s, 40s and 50s. The photos show a way of life now vanished. It’s closer in time, and probably also in terms of experience, to the life of the immigrant Clooneys.”

Read the full story here from Irish Lives remembered

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