Tag Archives: Twentyx20 reviews

Latest Newsletter 5/11/2014

Eneclann News – November 5th 2014

In this week’s newsletter we offer you more from Eneclann and all that is going on in the world of Irish family history. Recent events include the October Expert Workshop for CPD,  We have the last 5 reviews from our Twentyx20 lunch-time talks in the National Library. Our research tip this week is by Fiona Fitzsimons and we share with you all the happenings including how the Back to our Past show at the RDS went . Enjoy 🙂

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Back To Our Past 2014

 

We had the pleasure of exhibiting at Back To our Past 2014 in the RDS recently,Eneclann would like to say a big thank you to everyone who attended the event, old customers and new. You canread all about how we got on at the event here.

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Chapelizod Dereliction Exhibition

The upcoming exhibition “Chapelizod Dereliction” is the culmination of a nine-month community arts project led by Irish artist Debbie Chapman. The project was funded by Dublin City Council, the Ballyfermot/Chapelizod Partnership and our heritage researchers here at Eneclann, You can find all the details on thisamazing exhibition here.

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LAW 2014

Irish Probate Genealogy Partners will be exhibiting at stand 6 on the 11th and 12th of November as part of Ireland and the UK’s largest legal service roadshow“LAW”, LAW Dublin will be held at the Gresham Hotel, Dublin and promises to be the largest legal exhibition and conference to be held in the Republic of Ireland.For more information in the eventclick here

 

 

 

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Expert Workshops

 

In October the Expert Workshop took place on 11th October in the National Library of Ireland.Claire Bradley spoke on the topic:Crowdsourcing your Irish ancestry, how to use social media and message boards for genealogy.Read all abouthow the workshop went here

 

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Last 5 Twentyx20 Reviews

We have the last 5 reviews of our Twentyx20 Lunch time talks at the National Library of Ireland that were held in August, We attracted a record audience throughout the month, with our most entertaining line-up yet,Read all about it here.

 

 

 

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Research Tip of the week

Each newsletter we offer you a research tip written by one of our expert researcher’s, in the hope that we can help along your genealogy path. This week Fiona Fitzsimons has written a research tip on British Armed Forces Army Records.Have a read of theresearch tip here.

 

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Reviews for the next 5 Twentyx20 lunch-time talks

The following are the next 5 review’s of the Twentyx20 talks that were held at the National Library of Ireland for the month of August.

11. Rhona Murray

 Using Ancestry.com to trace your family History

Rhona talks                                                   Ancestry.com, the US genealogy web site, has billions of records online, but only recently has begun to develop an Irish record collection. Rhona flew in to describe the highlights of that collection, including their transcripts of the Tithe Applotment Books (originals at the National Archives), copies of the Lawrence collection of photographs (originals at the National Library), the Morpeth Roll and many other collections. She also discussed in detail their recent addition of over 1 million Catholic parish register entries, either in transcript form (from National Library microfilms) or with images (gathered by Dublin technology company eCeltic).

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12. John Mc Tierney

Reading Headstones primary sources carved in stone.

John runs an archaeology company who have developed an expertise in graveyards, surveying and recording tens of thousands of headstones from hundreds of cemeteries around Ireland and Britain. His team has also developed an exciting and rigorous approach to the whole process of recording the information in cemeteries. This is precisely because they are archaeologists rather than family historians. As a consequence they are as interested in the location of the grave, the material remains, its position within a cemetery and proximity to others. This is rich information that adds context and detail to the words carved onto the stone.

What is even more remarkable about the work of John’s team is that they are educators and facilitators working with local community groups to enable them to carry out the work under their expert supervision. The end result is then published online at www.historicgraves.com.

John is passionate about this project “it is about action – not sitting on the internet … Historic Graves are family names pinned onto the landscape – representing hundreds of years of continuity and change.”.

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13. Ellen O’Flaherty

Using the College Archives for family history research.

The archives at Trinity College are not well known to family historians, but they contain a great wealth of information. Ellen provided a tour of the key holdings. Naturally, these include copious student records. The entrance registers provide names of students, ages, name of farther, address and fathers occupation (and the images are available free online). But there are lot more student records, like examination records, scholarships, removals, church attendance and fines dispensed to staff and students alike. Ellen recounted some funny examples of food fights in the commons.The archive also has the records of college clubs and societies dating back to the 17th century. The University was a big employer in Dublin city too and the financial records are very useful for tracking staff. Ellen finished her fascinating talk by touching on the biggest collection for Irish genealogy at the Trinity Archives, their estate records. It is not generally well known that TCD was one of the biggest landowners in Ireland, having received land in various plantations and other land confiscations a different dates from its founding in 1592 to the 1700s. As a consequence they have rentals and other estate papers relating to almost every county in the country.

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14. Ian Tester

Digitising Irish newspapers: how we bring Ireland’s past stories back to life.

Ian gave an entertaining and informative guide through the British Newspaper Archive, the joint venture between the British Library and DC Thomson Family History (the owners of findmypast.com). This extraordinary project is digitising millions of newspaper pages from across Britain and Ireland. To date they have scanned 8.7 million pages from 266 different newspapers. So far they have published Irish newspaper titles, with 25 more in current production, and hundreds more after that. The value of newspapers for research is often poorly understood. Local and national newspapers covered an extensive range of subject matter. Ian gave us a glimpse of what he had uncovered on his own family, including wedding details, funerals, accidents and general gossip. He had plenty of advice about how to use newspapers for genealogical research, and was keen to impress that  “local stories are no just covered in local newspapers”.

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15. Lar Joye

No hope, except in arms: the Irish in European armies 1600 to 1945.

Lar Joye gave an absolute tour-de-force presentation, in a talk entitled “No hope except in arms: the Irish in European armies 1600 to 1945.”
Between 1600 and 1945 Irishmen joined the armed services of many European countries.
They served in countries around the world, in most of the major conflicts, and created the reputation of ‘the fighting Irish.’
Lar Joye gave a fascinating insight into the Irish regiments in French service 1685-1871; Spanish service 1709-1939; Italian service 1702-1862; and the Austrian service 1689-1956.
He further discussed the major wars in which they fought in Europe and America.
A few of these gained fame: Peter Lacy 1678-1751, became Field Marshal of the Russian Army.
Count Arthur Dillon 1750-94, led his regiment against the British during the American Revolutionary War, but was executed in 1794 by guillotine.
Myles Keogh was a veteran of the Papal Army and the U.S. Civil War.
The speaker rounded up his talk, with a brief discussion of the sources for the Irish in European armies.

The National Library of Ireland’s own Sources data-base lists and describes some of the original records relating to Irish soldiers in European armies held in archives in England, France, Spain, and Austria.

http://sources.nli.ie/

The audience’s only critique was that Lar Joye didn’t have longer to speak about a subject that he clearly has the mastery of.

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