Tag Archives: The national library of Ireland

Reviews for the next 5 Twentyx20 lunch-time talks

The following are the next 5 review’s of the Twentyx20 talks that were held at the National Library of Ireland for the month of August.

11. Rhona Murray

 Using Ancestry.com to trace your family History

Rhona talks                                                   Ancestry.com, the US genealogy web site, has billions of records online, but only recently has begun to develop an Irish record collection. Rhona flew in to describe the highlights of that collection, including their transcripts of the Tithe Applotment Books (originals at the National Archives), copies of the Lawrence collection of photographs (originals at the National Library), the Morpeth Roll and many other collections. She also discussed in detail their recent addition of over 1 million Catholic parish register entries, either in transcript form (from National Library microfilms) or with images (gathered by Dublin technology company eCeltic).

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12. John Mc Tierney

Reading Headstones primary sources carved in stone.

John runs an archaeology company who have developed an expertise in graveyards, surveying and recording tens of thousands of headstones from hundreds of cemeteries around Ireland and Britain. His team has also developed an exciting and rigorous approach to the whole process of recording the information in cemeteries. This is precisely because they are archaeologists rather than family historians. As a consequence they are as interested in the location of the grave, the material remains, its position within a cemetery and proximity to others. This is rich information that adds context and detail to the words carved onto the stone.

What is even more remarkable about the work of John’s team is that they are educators and facilitators working with local community groups to enable them to carry out the work under their expert supervision. The end result is then published online at www.historicgraves.com.

John is passionate about this project “it is about action – not sitting on the internet … Historic Graves are family names pinned onto the landscape – representing hundreds of years of continuity and change.”.

john talks

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13. Ellen O’Flaherty

Using the College Archives for family history research.

The archives at Trinity College are not well known to family historians, but they contain a great wealth of information. Ellen provided a tour of the key holdings. Naturally, these include copious student records. The entrance registers provide names of students, ages, name of farther, address and fathers occupation (and the images are available free online). But there are lot more student records, like examination records, scholarships, removals, church attendance and fines dispensed to staff and students alike. Ellen recounted some funny examples of food fights in the commons.The archive also has the records of college clubs and societies dating back to the 17th century. The University was a big employer in Dublin city too and the financial records are very useful for tracking staff. Ellen finished her fascinating talk by touching on the biggest collection for Irish genealogy at the Trinity Archives, their estate records. It is not generally well known that TCD was one of the biggest landowners in Ireland, having received land in various plantations and other land confiscations a different dates from its founding in 1592 to the 1700s. As a consequence they have rentals and other estate papers relating to almost every county in the country.

ellen talks

 

 

 

 

 

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14. Ian Tester

Digitising Irish newspapers: how we bring Ireland’s past stories back to life.

Ian gave an entertaining and informative guide through the British Newspaper Archive, the joint venture between the British Library and DC Thomson Family History (the owners of findmypast.com). This extraordinary project is digitising millions of newspaper pages from across Britain and Ireland. To date they have scanned 8.7 million pages from 266 different newspapers. So far they have published Irish newspaper titles, with 25 more in current production, and hundreds more after that. The value of newspapers for research is often poorly understood. Local and national newspapers covered an extensive range of subject matter. Ian gave us a glimpse of what he had uncovered on his own family, including wedding details, funerals, accidents and general gossip. He had plenty of advice about how to use newspapers for genealogical research, and was keen to impress that  “local stories are no just covered in local newspapers”.

Iain talks

 

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15. Lar Joye

No hope, except in arms: the Irish in European armies 1600 to 1945.

Lar Joye gave an absolute tour-de-force presentation, in a talk entitled “No hope except in arms: the Irish in European armies 1600 to 1945.”
Between 1600 and 1945 Irishmen joined the armed services of many European countries.
They served in countries around the world, in most of the major conflicts, and created the reputation of ‘the fighting Irish.’
Lar Joye gave a fascinating insight into the Irish regiments in French service 1685-1871; Spanish service 1709-1939; Italian service 1702-1862; and the Austrian service 1689-1956.
He further discussed the major wars in which they fought in Europe and America.
A few of these gained fame: Peter Lacy 1678-1751, became Field Marshal of the Russian Army.
Count Arthur Dillon 1750-94, led his regiment against the British during the American Revolutionary War, but was executed in 1794 by guillotine.
Myles Keogh was a veteran of the Papal Army and the U.S. Civil War.
The speaker rounded up his talk, with a brief discussion of the sources for the Irish in European armies.

The National Library of Ireland’s own Sources data-base lists and describes some of the original records relating to Irish soldiers in European armies held in archives in England, France, Spain, and Austria.

http://sources.nli.ie/

The audience’s only critique was that Lar Joye didn’t have longer to speak about a subject that he clearly has the mastery of.

lar talks

Culture night 2014

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Culture Night comprises of hundreds of events across Ireland and overseas. From nation’s capital to county town, everyone’s getting involved! Arts and cultural organisations open their doors until late with hundreds of free events, tours, talks & performances for you, your family and friends to enjoy.

Come and meet some of theEneclann,Ancestor Network andfindmypast  team on culture night who will provide a free genealogy advisory service in theNational Library of Irelandon Culture Night, Friday 19th September from 5pm to 10pm.

Fiona Fitzsimons, Hilary McDonagh and John Hamrock will all be there, providing the genealogy advisory service.

Who will you find when you pick up your family tree?

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Latest Eneclann Newsletter: 9th of June 2014

Eneclann Newsletter
In this issue:

Eneclann and Ancestor Network make it a hat trick.

Family History research winner.

UCC Genealogy Q&A with Nicola Morris.

Expert workshop with Noel Jenkins.

Research Tip of the week with Carmel Gilbride.


 

 

Dear Eneclann customer,

Eneclann and Ancestor Network make it a hat trick!

 

Free genealogy advisory service in the National Library of Ireland, Summer 2014.

National Museum of Ireland 300x225 Eneclann & Ancestor Network make it a hat trick!

 

The joint consortium ofEneclann andAncestor Network are delighted to announce that they will return to theNational Library of Ireland this summer following a competitive tendering process.

Speaking on behalf of the National Library of Ireland, Honora Faul said today:

“We are delighted to welcome back Eneclann & Ancestor Network, to support and enhance our summer genealogy service. It’s an invaluable service for anyone tracing their family history.”

Fiona Fitzsimons,Eneclann:
Eneclann Logo 300x94 Eneclann & Ancestor Network make it a hat trick!

“In Summer 2012 and 2013 we saw a significant rise in the numbers that availed of the genealogy service.We hope to welcome a record number of visitors to the library this summer”

Hilary Mc Donagh founder and director ofIrish Ancestry

ancestor network logo 300x108 Eneclann & Ancestor Network make it a hat trick!

“We are delighted to be part of this wonderful role for a third year running. It’s a privilege for us to assist visitors to the Library and to help them trace their family history.

Being part of the Library’s genealogy service allows us to share our expertise, it also means we come face to face with the ordinary Joe or Josephine, and learn what they are most interested in. We love to team up with our friends in Eneclann: both organisations can work together to help the public with all their research needs”

www.ancestornetwork.ie
1 Hyde Park Avenue, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland
Tel: +353 (0)87 0505296

Summer hours for the genealogy advisory service in the National Library of Ireland commences Tuesday 2nd June 2014.

nli logo Eneclann & Ancestor Network make it a hat trick!

The service is free to all visitors to the Library.

9.30 a.m. to 4.45 p.m. Monday to Friday,

9.30 a.m. to 12.45 on Saturday.


Family History Research Winner!

Last month’s winner of“Ireland of the Welcomes” Magazine competition prize, afamily history research andpublicationspackage worth over €1000 provided byEneclann, was a Mr John Egan from the city of Humble in Texas.

We caught up with John to ask him how he felt about winning this research prize with us, his response was one of great excitement and we are delighted to have such a worthy winner.

 

How did you feel when you found out you had won the competition from the Ireland of the welcomes magazine?

“I was very happy to find out I had won the services of such a professional team like Eneclann.

One of my cousins has done some research and developed a family tree starting back with the birth of Michael Egan, born 1824 in Marystown so I know there must be so much more to find out.

Winning this was just perfect. It will be wonderful to have an expert update of our family history. I am very excited, but also so curious to see what might be found in the research, it will also be interesting to see if this research will provide me with the sufficient information to obtain an Irish citizenship and passport. I have always really wanted to know my ancestry and now, with confidence, will have it fully documented by the experts at Eneclann”


Nicola Morris and UCC Genealogy School.

Ancestral Connections 2014 is an International Genealogy summer school developed by Lorna Moloney at ACE – University College Cork, it offers a programme of outstanding quality for those interested in tracing their Irish roots.

All aspects of subjects are covered by a series of presentations and ‘hands on’ workshops given by a selection of Ireland’s leading genealogical lecturers and experts.

Eneclann’s very own directors Fiona Fitzsimons & Brian Donovan will also be giving talks at the Summer school

Fiona Fitzsimons: Tuesday 1st July at 2pm-2.35pm:

“Online sources for Irish family history research and how to use them”

Brian Donovan: Tuesday 1st July at 4pm-5pm:

“Usingfindmypast.ie for family history reseacrh: court prison, land records and more”

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This week we caught up with Director of  Timeline Research Ltd,Nicola Morris  who will  be giving two talks  atThe UCC Genealogy School.

Nicola Morris will be giving two talks on

Thursday the 3rd of July

 

11.15pm -12.00pm“Irish Newspapers, a source for Genealogical research”

12.00-12.45pm“Irish Estate papers as a source for Genealogical research”


Have a lookhere at the line up for this amazing summer school


Continuous Professional Development in Irish Family History

We continue the series of expert workshops withNoel Jenkins on the

“Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) Records from 1654 to present day”

Venue: The Religious Society of Friends (Quaker) Library and Archive in Stocking Lane, Rathfarnham.

Time: 10a.m to 4p.m.
Date: Tuesday 24th June.

Noel is the most genial of genealogists, and we’re delighted that he has agreed to deliver a workshop on the Quaker records, combined with a behind-the-scenes tour of the library and archive.

Noel has a thorough knowledge of the Religious Society of Friends records, and prepared the archival catalogue in 2012 with the curator Christopher Moriarty.

Noel operates a professional research service, and can be contacted by emailwnoel@eircom.net

Since 2010 he has assisted visitors to the Quaker Archive with their research, and in 2012 and 2013 provided the genealogy advisory service in the National Library and National Archives of Ireland.

Noel was one of the research team behind the hit TV programme, The Genealogy Roadshow broadcast in 2014.

Description

Title: Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) Records from 1654 to present day.

The Quakers have been in Ireland since 1654. In this workshop Noel Jenkins provides an introduction to their records and beliefs, and discusses other records that have been generated from these original documents. In particular, those records that document their involvement in and contribution to Irish society. Of particular interest are the records of the Liberty Creche opened in 1830; the Claremount Institute opened in 1824; Cork Penny Dinners; Bloomfield Hospital, and the Quaker schools around Ireland.

The workshop concludes with a tour of the Library and Strong Room including viewing Quaker memorabilia.

There will be 6 computers available to explore the Mega Database, which includes an overview of everything in the building.
We will provide tea and coffee at lunchtime, so people are requested to bring some lunch.

Numbers are strictly limited, and anyone who would like to attend this free workshop should apply for a ticket by writing toworkshop@localhost
Tickets will be assigned on a first come basis.


Research Tip of the Week!

 

The availability of the Will Calendars on the website of the National Archive canbe very useful to family researchers.
It may be that you have searched online indexes for a death without success.

It may seem obvious that the person you seek would have died in Ireland so why is their death not in the records of the General Register Office?
When searching the Wills Calendars online, follow one of the golden rules
of genealogy by keeping your search as wide as possible.

Take the example of Sir Thomas Wyse, MP of Waterford.
If you input Wyse, Thomas and put in the county, you will not have any success.
However, if you input Wyse, Thomas, leaving the county blank, you will see that Sir Thomas Wyse, MP, late of the Manor of St John of Waterford, in fact died in Greece, while he was serving as a Minister in Her Majesty’s government.

By narrowing down your search at an early stage, you risk losing the very record you seek.

By, Carmel Gilbride

 


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Best wishes, The Eneclann Team

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Latest Eneclann Newsletter: 9th of May 2014

Eneclann Newsletter

In this issue:

Twentyx20 Lunchtime Talks.

Irish Lives Rememebred.

Irish Census Records Covering 1821-1851

UCC Summer School

New Digital Downloads at Eneclann

Military History Archive Records.

Research Tip of the Week.

 


 

 

Dear Eneclann customer,

The Return of The Twentyx20 Lunch Time Talks

This August at the National Library of Ireland, Eneclann and Ancestor Network will host a feast for family history fans! It’s the return of theTwentyx20 lunch-time talks.We have assembled a veritable smorgasbord of experts to unlock the richness of Irish family history.

Each talk is a short introduction to a key area, source or research method in Irish family history.  The Q&A session will give you direct access to the experts, to take the mystery out of family history.

Talks start after 1 p.m. every weekday in August.

Click here to see the full list of our speakers.

For more information and for event updates keep on eye on ourWebsite blog and also ourFacebook page as we will be updating these regularly with all the information you will need to know on all our wonderful speakers or you can email us atmarketing@localhost


Irish Lives remembered.

This monthsIrish Lives Remembered Online Magazine is now out! featuring a three page spread byEneclann Research Expert and Director Fiona Fitzsimons on “The Carlow origins of Carol Ann Duffy, British poet Laureate”, on pages 14&15, Also In this months issue you can read all about The National Archives of Ireland,FindmypastandFamilySearch and the release of pre 1901-Census Records, including many more wonderful articles from the world of Genealogy.


Surviving Irish Census Records Covering 1821-1851 go online for the first time.

New and online for the first time ever inFindmypast’s 100 in 100 campaign, surviving Irish census records.

Listen toEneclann Director Brian Donovan, explain the importance of these new online records, and why he is excited about their publication

Click the image below to head over to ourFacebook page and view all the images from The Launch of the Pre-1901 Online Census records in The National Archives of Ireland where Jimmy Deenihan, TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Frances McGee, Acting Director of the National Archives of Ireland and our very own Brian Donovan were all there along with many more to launch these exciting new records.


Hilary McDonagh and The Genealogy Summer School.

Ancestral Connections 2014 is an International Genealogy summer school developed by Lorna Moloney at ACE – University College Cork, it offers a programme of outstanding quality for those interested in tracing their Irish roots.

All aspects of subjects are covered by a series of presentations and ‘hands on’ workshops given by a selection of Ireland’s leading genealogical lecturers and experts,

This week we caught up with Hilary McDonagh Director ofIrish Ancestry who will be giving a number of interesting talks at the Summer school and asked him to give us a little idea of what he is all about.

Hilary McDonagh will be giving a talk on-Friday the 4th of July: 2pm-2.45pm:
Sons & Children- Genealogy of Irish Childhood.

Have a lookhereat the line up for this amazing summer school.

 


Latest Downloads available at Eneclann

We now have 14 new download releases available on our website
14 new download conversions available, for as little as €1.25, including:
  • Several Parish Register Society publications of registers from Dublin city dating from 1619 (parishes of St. Catharine, St. John, St. Marie, St. Luke, St. Werburgh and St. Nicholas Without)
  • Bram Stoker’s first book
  • Topographical books about Galway, Mayo, Roscommon, etc
  • Local and national histories of Irelan
  • Directories.
You can view and purchase all of our 14 latest download releases over on our website

justclick here to have a look and purchase.


Military History Archive Records.

In this Months edition ofHistory Ireland Magazine, Eneclann’s own Fiona Fitzsimons takes a closer look at the records of the Military History Archive. “If you have a rebel in the family, or a Volunteer ancestor active during the Irish Revolutionary period 1913-1923, this is where you look.” These archives have further information for anyone with family in the Defence Forces since the foundation of the State. “History Ireland” is in all good newsagents and selected bookshops and available to buy now.


Research Tip of the week

Let him be. He learnt the lesson of the land” – Bull McCabe.

Irish people’s obsession with land and property, so beautifully encapsulated by John B. Keane’s play The Field and latterly in the film adaptation, is well known. It’s an obsession that any family history researcher would do well to embrace.

When I first came to genealogy I knew my historical research skills would stand me in good stead, but I failed to appreciate the importance geography plays in the pursuit of ones ancestors.

If you’re unfortunate enough to have an ancestor with a name as common as Mary Murphy, it is often geography that will help you select the records relating to your ancestor and avoid the doppelgangers. The majority of the record sources used by family historians have a geographic element to them and using these, as a means of narrowing your searches, is an essential part of research.

Knowing your civil, parish and townland boundaries can make all the difference in identifying the correct record, not to mention saving time by looking in the wrong place. Don’t forget to check both sides of a boundary if you believe your ancestors lived near one. Equally don’t get too focussed on one location either, remember people did move about.

So while the Bull McCabe may have had a different lesson in mind, the lesson for this researcher was that knowing your geography can make you a better historian.

By:Stephen Peirce.


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Best wishes, The Eneclann Team

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