Tag Archives: The Genealogy event Limerick

Latest Eneclann Newsletter 25th July 2014

Eneclann Newsletter
In this issue:

Celtic Connections Conference 2014.

The Genealogy event Limerick.

Lunch time talks in the National Library.

Free Genealogy advisory service 2014.

Research Tip of  the week.

Carmel Gilbride unlocks the past for passengers


 

 

The Latest Eneclann Newsletter………

The Celtic Connections Conference 2014

 

Eneclann’s very own Brian Donovan heads state side for the Celtic Connections conference this August!

This August the 15th and 16th our very own expert Brian Donovan will be heading to the Celtic Connections Conference in Waltham, Massachusetts to join all the leading experts in genealogy from near and far, Brian will be speaking on the following topics:

Usingfindmypast.com to Trace your Irish Family History.

Murderer, rebels and Drunkards: Your Irish ancestors and the Law.

This two day event will include 20+ lecturers and 26 presentations by well-known experts in their respective fields.

such as:
John Grenham
Eileen Ó Dúill
Sean Ó Dúill
Kyle Betit
 Dwight Radford
Donna Moughty
Bill Budde
and many more!

Go towww.celtic-connections.org now for all you need to know on this great event.


The Genealogy Event Limerick

The countdown is on to The Genealogy Event in Limerick with only 5 weeks to go, If you are planning a trip to Ireland or a trip to Limerick then The Genealogy Event is one not to be missed, It will take place on the 22nd and 23rd of August, The two day event will bring you presentations by the experts in genealogy along with other social events that will help attendees meet one another in relaxed settings.

 Dont forget to look out for our very own Eneclann duo, Fiona Fitzsimons and Brian Donovan who will also be there to give their expert advise 😉

Phone: +353 61 331549

Email:info@bbnygroup.com

Web:www.thegenealogyevent.com

Tickets may be purchased online via thebuy tickets here button or

contacting Event Partner, the Irish Ancestry Research Centre on +353 61 207 114

 


Lunch Time talks in the National Library

This August at theNational Library of Ireland,Eneclann andAncestor Network will host a feast for family history fans! It’s the return of the Twentyx20 lunch-time talks.Each talk is a short introduction to a key area, source or research method in Irish family history. The Q&A session will give you direct access to the experts.


Free Genealogy advisory service in the National Library of Ireland 2014

The joint consortium ofEneclannandAncestorNetworkare providing a wide and comprehensive range of expertise in The National Library of Ireland all summer to anyone looking for help and advice in tracing their family history,

The service is free to all visitors to the Library.

9.30 a.m. to 4.45 p.m. Monday to Friday,

9.30 a.m. to 12.45 on Saturday.

See you there!


Eneclann helps Unlock the Past for Cruise ship Passengers

This morning in theNational Library of Ireland,
Eneclann research expert Carmel Gilbride, gave a talk on migration to Australia to the cruise ship passengers ofUnlock the Past cruises, Carmel also shared her expert advise and answered questions and queries that the Australian passengers had regarding their Irish Family history, the cruise ship passengers used the library to seek out all the information they wanted through out the morning and with the help of Carmel they hopefully unravelled some mysteries.


Research Tip of the week

It may be that we think we have mined everything we can about our families from the 1901 and 1911 Census. But a few recent searches have had me re evaluate this idea.

It can be so difficult to select the correct family when the name is one that proliferates. It seems, at the outset to be impossible.
But along the way, we may establish a county of birth and that can narrow down our search.

Then we may learn an occupation and this can be really key in selecting the correct record.  But, even at that point, – given the proliferation of labourers in Ireland’s economy of the opening decades of the 20th century – we can be still be faced with a choice.Great care is needed at this point to ensure we do not dismiss records from our search.

We might expect to find, the pairing of say a husband and wife, the parents of children we have found. But, we should be mindful of the fact that one or other parent may have died and remarried. Pay particular attention, in the 1911 Census, to the number of years married.

If the wife indicates that she has been married for ten years, yet there are persons listed as children as the head of household who are older than ten, then you have to dig deeper.

The children {of whatever age} are correctly enumerated as the offspring of the head of household. But these children are not necessarily the children
of his wife.
If you are very fortunate, the second marriage of this head of household may be civilly registered, where his first marriage was not. In this way, you may be able to bring a family back, through following the clues in the census, to an earlier generation.

Carmel Gilbride,
Research Expert,

 

 


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Best wishes, The Eneclann Team

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Latest Eneclann Newsletter: 11th July 2014

Eneclann Newsletter
In this issue:

The Truth behind George Clooney’s Irish Family History.

UCC Genealogy School is a hit

20×20 talks this summer

The Genealogy event Limerick.

World War one Roadshow

Brian Mitchell,Tracing Derry-Londonderry roots.

Experts Workshops for CPD conclude for the Summer

Chapelizod Art project update

Research tip of the week


 

 

Dear Eneclann customer,

Fiona Fitzsimons Discovers the truth behind George Clooney’s Irish Family History

Using newly available records on www.findmypast.ie renowned genealogist Fiona Fitzsimons discovered Clooney’s Irish ancestors didn’t jump, but were pushed.Clooney’s Irish ancestors were small farmers from Windgap, co. Kilkenny.  In the 1850s  local farmers competed for land.
This sometimes tipped-over into violence.  New evidence proves that in 1852 Nicholas Clooney (George’s great x 2 grandfather) was violently assaulted. Months later he was harrased through the court system.

“In 1852 Nicholas Clooney suffered a real injustice. He decided shortly after to leave Ireland and settle in Kentucky.  “The rest is history.” Says Fiona, Research showed that Nicholas’s widowed mother (George Clooney’s great x3 grandmother) remained behind in Ireland.
“Now through a family connection and for the first time, we have photographs of the old Clooney house and farm taken in the 1930s, 40s and 50s.  The photos show a way of life now vanished.  It’s closer in time, and probably also in terms of experience, to the life of the immigrant Clooneys.”

Read the full story here
https://flipflashpages.uniflip.com/3/71043/333233/pub/html5.html#

You can listen to Fiona’s interview on Morning IrelandRTÉ Radio 1 and the truth behind the research by clicking below.

 


UCC Irish Genealogy Summer School is a hit!

Eneclann Genealogy experts Fiona Fitzsimons and Brian Donovan both spoke at the UCC Irish Genealogy Summer School last week.”Ancestral Connections is going from strength to strength.
Eneclann provides core lectures and Brian Donovan and Fiona Fitzsimons bring academic excellence to genealogical practice-based frameworks”by Lorna Moloney.Booking for the 2015 Summer School will open on 24th July, later this month.

See thewebsite  for more.


 Lunch time talks in the National Library of Ireland

This August at theNational Library of Ireland,Eneclann andAncestor Network will host a feast for family history fans! It’s the return of the Twentyx20 lunch-time talks. Each talk is a short introduction to a key area, source or research method in Irish family history. The Q&A session will give you direct access to the experts.

Read more about these talks In this months edition of Irish Lives Remembered here :https://flipflashpages.uniflip.com/3/71043/333233/pub/html5.html

 


The Genealogy Event Limerick

2014 recognises Limerick as the “City of Culture” and the 3rd weekend in August sees the beginning of National Heritage Week
so what better way to celebrate both than with,

The Genealogy Event!
This two day event promises to be a real humdinger!

Information sessions on a broad range of Irish genealogy topics will be given by some of the top experts in the industry. The Eneclann duo, Fiona Fitzsimons and Brian Donovan will also be there 🙂

“The event has been set up to help genealogists and family historians at all levels and bring together people from around the world with Irish roots,” says BBNY Group founder, Bridget Bray.

Introductory and advanced sessions will focus on surname origins, genetics and genealogy, civil, church and military records.
For those who really want to dig deep, there are expert sessions on the Registry of Deeds, and Irish sources for children in care 1840s to 1990s.
The U.S.National Archives (NARA) will also make a rare appearance in Ireland, to introduce the use of U.S. immigration and Naturalization records.

 

In addition toEneclann, expert speakers at the event will include Tony Browne (local historian), Paul Cotter (surnames expert) Eileen O’ Duill (Civil rights expert), Lorna Moloney (U.C.C Genealogy Summer School & Merriman Research) and Paddy Waldron (Limerick/Clare Expert). Organisations present will include IARC, the LDS, NARA and Roots Ireland.The event has many experts who will be on hand to offer guidance and advice.

This two day event will take place inThe Strand Hotel, Limerick, Buy your ticket today and experience “The Genealogy Event 2014″

 

For more information on

The Genealogy Event
visit them onFacebook Or theirWebsite.

 


World War One Roadshow at Trinity College Dublin

Trinity College Dublin in partnership withRTÉ Radio One and theNational Library of Ireland is hosting a Family History Collections Day of World War One memorabilia this Saturday, July 12th where members of the public are invited to bring in family items, letters and mementos related to the war for authentication and archiving by a team of experts,

Paul Manzor fromEneclann and Aoife O’ Connor from findmypast  will be there to provide research advice and guide you through the records of ancestors that served in World War 1

findmypast will provide free access throughout the day to all their World War 1 records.
Don’t forget to pop over to both our stands and say hello!

It looks like it’s going to be one very eventful day.  For more information and a full time-table of the day, click on the image.

 


Brian Mitchell publishes new book

Tracing Derry-Londonderry roots.

‘Londonderry’ sketch by John Nixon circa 1790

Brian Mitchell, the best-selling author of A New Genealogical Atlas of Ireland, has a new book out, for anyone tracing their family history in the city and county of Derry/ Londonderry.Tracing Derry~Londonderry Roots was published in the U.S. earlier this year.

“Genealogy has great potential to reconnect Derry with its Diaspora and as a promotional tool to potential visitors and tour groups”, says Brian Mitchell.
“Just recently I was communicating by email with Jim O’Reilly of Chicago who is one of 700 direct descendants of Charles Curran who emigrated from Brockagh (2 miles south of Eglinton), via Derry, to USA in 1865. This June they are holding a family reunion in Pittsburgh; the seed has been sown to visit Derry and their ancestral home in the future”  Brian Mitchell,

Contact him at (genealogy@derrycity.gov.uk),

Brian’s book is now available to buyhere


Expert workshops for CPD conclude for the summer.

This last week the Expert workshops series concluded for the summer, with two workshops on genetic genealogy given by Dr. Gerard Corcoran.
The series of Expert workshops for Continuous Professional Development began in April 2014.

Already we’ve held ten workshops, drawing on the expertise of our own GAS membership, as well as overseas speakers including Dr. Liz Rushen (Colonial Duchesses, Fair Game).

Monthly Workshops are held in Trinity College and the National Library of Ireland, both institutions with which Eneclann has a close association.

These free workshops are open to our own GAS membership, but also to other professional genealogists, enthusiasts and independent scholars.

We’re taking the month of August off, but the series will resume in September.

“Maeve and I would like to thank all our speakers who generously gave their time, energy and expertise.
We’ve had a lot of fun in these first few months, and have built up a regular audience.
We hope you’ve enjoyed the workshops as much as we have, and hope to see you again this Autumn”
Fiona Fitzsimons.

“The CPD talks have been tremendously interesting and the workshop format has prompted a worthwhile discussion among attendees”
Maeve Mullin

“The Expert Workshops are well worth the journey from Limerick. We have all tapped into new resources with the different speakers”
Kay Caball

 

 


Chapelizod Art Project update

 

Debbie Chapman is keen to involve the two local schools in theChapelizod Art Project.
She has already completed a workshop with the children of St. Patrick’s National School.
This Monday Debbie will hold a free workshop with the children of St. Laurence’s National School.
Chapelizod Bandroom,11am -12 pm, Monday 14th July.

DRAWING DAY  (all ages)  – Sat 19 July 2014, 2  – 5pm Meet at the Square in Chapelizod Village.  Bring materials or some will be provided. Most suitable drawings will be chosen for inclusion in
the Exhibition  & Project Book in Sept/Oct 2014.

PHOTOGRAPHY  (all ages)  – email your photos of Chapelizod’s ‘Dereliction’ to info@debbiechapman.com by August 31st.
Most suitable ones will be chosen by local photographer Motoko
Fujita for inclusion in the Exhibition  & Project Book in Sept/Oct 2014.

POETRY  (all ages)  – email your poetry or prose compositions to   info@debbiechapman.com for inclusion in the Exhibition  & Project
Book in Sept/Oct 2014.

Check out all the latest updates on the project over on theChapelizod Dereliction facebook page


Research tip of the week

A quirk of registration

If you can’t find a record of birth in your family’s usual parish of residence, it may be because your ancestors gave birth away from home.Traditionally, many women returned to their mother’s house for assistance when they had their first child. The child may then be registered in their mother’s home parish, rather than the family’s usual place of residence.  Another common instance in which a woman gave birth ‘away’ from home, was if she attended the county hospital.The county hospitals shared a campus with the workhouse, and from the 1850s many poor women used it as a ‘lying-in’ hospital. You can make this ‘quirk of registration’ work for you, by searching the baptismal registers of the parish, and from 1864 civil births by the Registrar’s District in which the workhouse campus was situated.

By Research Expert, Fiona Fitzsimons,

 


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Best wishes, The Eneclann Team

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