Tag Archives: Research tip of the week.

Research Tip of the week, 31st – October 2015.

Each newsletter we offer you a research tip written by one of our expert researcher’s, in the hope that we can somehow help along your genealogy path. This week Fiona Fitzsimons has written a research tip on British Armed Forces Army Records.

Fiona_Fitzsimons

British Armed Forces

Army records

The most complete online collection of historic British Armed Service Records from 1760 to the present is available on www.findmypast.com

Some of the most important collections relevant to Irish family history include:

  • Chelsea Pensioners British Army service records 1760-1913 (WO97)
  • Royal Hospital, Chelsea: pensioners’ discharge documents 1760-1887 (WO121)
  • Royal Hospital, Chelsea: pensioners’ discharge documents, foreign regiments 1816-1817 (WO122)
  • Royal Hospital, Chelsea: documents of soldiers awarded deferred pensions 1838-1896 (WO131)

The difference between Chelsea Pensioners and Kilmainham Pensioners, was that Kilmanham Pensioners ‘lived-in’. The Royal Hospital in Chelsea administered pensions for Irish soldiers living in their own homes in England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales. If your Irish ancestor enlisted in the British Army, but returned home to Ireland after completing his term of duty, you are likely to find him in the Chelsea Pensioners records.

Latest Eneclann Newsletter

Eneclann News- October 10th 2014

In this week’s newsletter we offer you more from Eneclann and what’s going on in the world of Irish family history. Recent events include radio interviews with Fiona Fitzsimons, and an interview with Paul Manzor, Eneclann’s publications manager on the subject of Digitisation. We look forward to the next Expert Workshop in Family History at the National Library (11 Oct.); and to the Back to our past show in the RDS (17, 18, 19 Oct.) Our research tip this week is by acclaimed genealogist Helen Moss

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The History Show

Last Sunday (5th Oct.) Fiona Fitzsimons was a guest on Myles Dungan’sHistory Show on RTE1. The topic of discussion was on the new release of the Pensions Applications forms for service during the Irish Revolutionary Period 1913-23. “Pension applications usually contain the greatest amount of genealogical information, of all military records.This is because pensions can be claimed by family dependents – widows, aged parents, minor children, and sometimes also dependent siblings” Fiona also emphasised the improved search function of the Pensions Data base, that hugely increases the user’s ability to drill down into the records. In particular, the drop-down menus that allow to search by organisation, eg: Cumann na mBan, Connaught Rangers, etc.Listen here to the interview as Fiona encourages a good browse across the records.

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Back to our past 2014

Back to our past is right around the corner, and of course Eneclann will be exhibiting – at stand 30, 30a, 31 and 31a. Come and meet our team of expert researchers, ready to help you with your family history research. Eneclann’s own Brian Donovan and Fiona Fitzsimons will give talks on Friday and Saturday.  On Sunday our guest speaker will be internationally renowned genealogist, Eileen O’Duill.  We will be joined at our stand by Mary Choppa fromTIARA (The Irish Ancestral Research Association), to provide an ‘American perspective’ on Irish immigrants to the U.S.Click here for more information.

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Digitisation and Publications at Eneclann

Since 1998 Eneclann has been at the forefront of digital publishing for Irish genealogy and history.  We started with CD-ROMs, before moving to online delivery, and more recently digital downloads.  Now Eneclann’s Publishing Manager, Paul Manzor, has written an  article to give you a better understanding ofwhere we’re at with Digitisation and publications.

newsletter bar      Expert Workshops

The Expert Workshops in Irish Family History series resumed in September with a double bill on emigration from the Poor Law Unions, by Kay Caball in Trinity College, and Dr. Gerard Moran in the National Library. In October, we continue this Saturday (11 Oct.) with Claire Bradley speaking on ‘Crowd-sourcing’ in the National Library.Read all about the it here.

clare bradley workshop

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great great family tree's

Great Great Great Family Tree’s

Tony Hennessy has launched his new websiteGreat Great Great Family Treesand you can check it out on hisfacebook page. If you are looking to get your family tree created and personalised, but don’t know where to start then this is the place for you.

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The Genealogy Radio Show

Our friend and colleague Lorna Moloney has a new radio show“The Genealogy Radio Show” on Community Radio Corca Baisciinn.Each week she looks at a different aspect of Irish family history live.  Listen to a podcast of her recent interview withEneclann’s Fiona Fitzsimons speaking on tracing records of children: ‘Painless facts: do they exist in genealogy?  Find thefull interview here.

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Research tip of the week

Each newsletter we offer you a research tip written by one of our expert researcher’s, in the hope that we can somehow help you along your genealogy path. This week Helen Moss has written a research tip on “researching mid-19th century marriage registers.”

You can read thefull research tip here

research tip of the week

 

Research Tip of the Week.

This week’s research tip is written by Research Expert Helen Moss

tom-cruise

We often come across people researching their ancestors who are disappointed with the lack of details in mid-19th century marriage registers.  In Roman Catholic marriage registers the name of the bride and groom, their witnesses and sometimes a townland were the only details recorded.  But there is one other record in the right hand column that often also appears and is frequently ignored.  It’s the fee paid by the couple to the priest for the marriage and when the figures are compared to others fees in the register they can frequently be a good indicator of the economic standing of the couple.  So if your ancestors’ fee was waived and an entry of ’0 – 0 – 0′ recorded it can tell you that times were difficult for them at that time.

 

 

Research Tip of the Week 26/9/2014

This weeks Research Tip is written by Enecann Research Expert, Fiona Fitzsimons

Fiona_Fitzsimons

As co-ordinator of the Twentyx20 genealogy talks in the NLI this summer, I had the enjoyable task of attending all the lunch-time talks, and meeting each of the speakers.  One of the talks that really stood out for me, was by Damian Shiels who spoke on the Irish in the American Civil War.

The Irish that fought in the American Civil War were mainly the Famine Irish that settled in the United States between ca. 1845 and 1861.

IT’s possible to trace these men using online records.

The Compiled Military Service Records (C.M.S.R.) are soldiers’ service records, collated from contemporary documents, more than a generation after the war ended,.  These are essentially abstracts of evidence taken from original documents including enlistment, muster and pay-rolls; death notices, hospital and prison registers; descriptive accounts/ service narratives.  These records survive for soldiers of the Union and the Confederate Army, for each regiment in which they served.

Records of Union soldiers were compiled from 1886; records of the Confederate soldiers from 1903. There are more than double the number of records, than there were soldiers, so scrutinise all matching records for a typo in a name, or a change of regiment.

An index to the Compiled Military Service Records is available free online.  It provides a basic index – name, rank, unit and State – by which you may identify individual service records on microfilm

https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1910717

The [Civil War] Soldiers and Sailors (CWSS) data-base is currently under construction.  On completion this will be a portal-site for the history of the American Civil War, and will include records of battles and military units, burial records in the National Cemeteries, Prisoners and Medals of Honour.

http://www.nps.gov/civilwar/soldiers-and-sailors-database.htm

I shuddered when I read NARA’s archival description of the Compiled Military Service Records. “The abstracts were so carefully prepared that it is rarely necessary to consult the original muster rolls and other records from which they were made.” One of the few constants in any field of human endeavour, be it stamp-collecting or maths-physics, is the possibility of h human error.  Where you can’t find a soldier examine the printed lists of both armies, edited by Janet B. Hewett

  •  The Roster of Union Soldiers, 1861-1865, 33 vols.
  • The Roster of Confederate Soldiers, 1861-1865, 16 vols.

 

The best guide to this fascinating subject is Damian Shiels’ book The Irish in the American Civil War, published in 2013 by History Press.]

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Win a Spot Prize

Q. What ‘s a collective noun for a bunch of genealogists?

A frustration of genealogists, a brick-wall of family historians, an obsession of researchers

The best answer wins a spot prize from Eneclann,

Email your answer to marketing@eneclann.ie

Research Tip of the Week! 10-9-2014.

This weeks Research Tip of the week is written by Enecann Research Expert, Carmel Gilbride

carmel gilbride

Family history concerns itself with mapping people to places. We need to be familiar with the places where events in our ancestors lives may have taken place. One of our ‘go to’ sources for this information is the work of Brian Mitchell, including hisGuide to the Parishes of Ireland. Guide to the graveyards and parishes in Ireland  and the new edition of hisAtlas

These publications are an invaluable source for family historians.  The simple numbering of parishes, of all denominations, within counties can signal  to us to the scale of our task. At a glance we can see, for example, how many Presbyterian congregations there may be in a given civil parish. We are then alerted to the extent of our possible search.

As graveyards are a constant source of interest for family historians, Mitchell’s listings of graveyards by denomination within counties , together with Ordinance Survey reference, can really help to pinpoint a likely place of burial for our ancestors,

Latest Eneclann Newsletter 25th July 2014

Eneclann Newsletter
In this issue:

Celtic Connections Conference 2014.

The Genealogy event Limerick.

Lunch time talks in the National Library.

Free Genealogy advisory service 2014.

Research Tip of  the week.

Carmel Gilbride unlocks the past for passengers


 

 

The Latest Eneclann Newsletter………

The Celtic Connections Conference 2014

 

Eneclann’s very own Brian Donovan heads state side for the Celtic Connections conference this August!

This August the 15th and 16th our very own expert Brian Donovan will be heading to the Celtic Connections Conference in Waltham, Massachusetts to join all the leading experts in genealogy from near and far, Brian will be speaking on the following topics:

Usingfindmypast.com to Trace your Irish Family History.

Murderer, rebels and Drunkards: Your Irish ancestors and the Law.

This two day event will include 20+ lecturers and 26 presentations by well-known experts in their respective fields.

such as:
John Grenham
Eileen Ó Dúill
Sean Ó Dúill
Kyle Betit
 Dwight Radford
Donna Moughty
Bill Budde
and many more!

Go towww.celtic-connections.org now for all you need to know on this great event.


The Genealogy Event Limerick

The countdown is on to The Genealogy Event in Limerick with only 5 weeks to go, If you are planning a trip to Ireland or a trip to Limerick then The Genealogy Event is one not to be missed, It will take place on the 22nd and 23rd of August, The two day event will bring you presentations by the experts in genealogy along with other social events that will help attendees meet one another in relaxed settings.

 Dont forget to look out for our very own Eneclann duo, Fiona Fitzsimons and Brian Donovan who will also be there to give their expert advise ;)

Phone: +353 61 331549

Email:info@bbnygroup.com

Web:www.thegenealogyevent.com

Tickets may be purchased online via thebuy tickets here button or

contacting Event Partner, the Irish Ancestry Research Centre on +353 61 207 114

 


Lunch Time talks in the National Library

This August at theNational Library of Ireland,Eneclann andAncestor Network will host a feast for family history fans! It’s the return of the Twentyx20 lunch-time talks.Each talk is a short introduction to a key area, source or research method in Irish family history. The Q&A session will give you direct access to the experts.


Free Genealogy advisory service in the National Library of Ireland 2014

The joint consortium ofEneclannandAncestorNetworkare providing a wide and comprehensive range of expertise in The National Library of Ireland all summer to anyone looking for help and advice in tracing their family history,

The service is free to all visitors to the Library.

9.30 a.m. to 4.45 p.m. Monday to Friday,

9.30 a.m. to 12.45 on Saturday.

See you there!


Eneclann helps Unlock the Past for Cruise ship Passengers

This morning in theNational Library of Ireland,
Eneclann research expert Carmel Gilbride, gave a talk on migration to Australia to the cruise ship passengers ofUnlock the Past cruises, Carmel also shared her expert advise and answered questions and queries that the Australian passengers had regarding their Irish Family history, the cruise ship passengers used the library to seek out all the information they wanted through out the morning and with the help of Carmel they hopefully unravelled some mysteries.


Research Tip of the week

It may be that we think we have mined everything we can about our families from the 1901 and 1911 Census. But a few recent searches have had me re evaluate this idea.

It can be so difficult to select the correct family when the name is one that proliferates. It seems, at the outset to be impossible.
But along the way, we may establish a county of birth and that can narrow down our search.

Then we may learn an occupation and this can be really key in selecting the correct record.  But, even at that point, – given the proliferation of labourers in Ireland’s economy of the opening decades of the 20th century – we can be still be faced with a choice.Great care is needed at this point to ensure we do not dismiss records from our search.

We might expect to find, the pairing of say a husband and wife, the parents of children we have found. But, we should be mindful of the fact that one or other parent may have died and remarried. Pay particular attention, in the 1911 Census, to the number of years married.

If the wife indicates that she has been married for ten years, yet there are persons listed as children as the head of household who are older than ten, then you have to dig deeper.

The children {of whatever age} are correctly enumerated as the offspring of the head of household. But these children are not necessarily the children
of his wife.
If you are very fortunate, the second marriage of this head of household may be civilly registered, where his first marriage was not. In this way, you may be able to bring a family back, through following the clues in the census, to an earlier generation.

Carmel Gilbride,
Research Expert,

 

 


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Best wishes, The Eneclann Team

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Latest Eneclann Newsletter: 11th July 2014

Eneclann Newsletter
In this issue:

The Truth behind George Clooney’s Irish Family History.

UCC Genealogy School is a hit

20×20 talks this summer

The Genealogy event Limerick.

World War one Roadshow

Brian Mitchell,Tracing Derry-Londonderry roots.

Experts Workshops for CPD conclude for the Summer

Chapelizod Art project update

Research tip of the week


 

 

Dear Eneclann customer,

Fiona Fitzsimons Discovers the truth behind George Clooney’s Irish Family History

Using newly available records on www.findmypast.ie renowned genealogist Fiona Fitzsimons discovered Clooney’s Irish ancestors didn’t jump, but were pushed.Clooney’s Irish ancestors were small farmers from Windgap, co. Kilkenny.  In the 1850s  local farmers competed for land.
This sometimes tipped-over into violence.  New evidence proves that in 1852 Nicholas Clooney (George’s great x 2 grandfather) was violently assaulted. Months later he was harrased through the court system.

“In 1852 Nicholas Clooney suffered a real injustice. He decided shortly after to leave Ireland and settle in Kentucky.  “The rest is history.” Says Fiona, Research showed that Nicholas’s widowed mother (George Clooney’s great x3 grandmother) remained behind in Ireland.
“Now through a family connection and for the first time, we have photographs of the old Clooney house and farm taken in the 1930s, 40s and 50s.  The photos show a way of life now vanished.  It’s closer in time, and probably also in terms of experience, to the life of the immigrant Clooneys.”

Read the full story here
https://flipflashpages.uniflip.com/3/71043/333233/pub/html5.html#

You can listen to Fiona’s interview on Morning IrelandRTÉ Radio 1 and the truth behind the research by clicking below.

 


UCC Irish Genealogy Summer School is a hit!

Eneclann Genealogy experts Fiona Fitzsimons and Brian Donovan both spoke at the UCC Irish Genealogy Summer School last week.”Ancestral Connections is going from strength to strength.
Eneclann provides core lectures and Brian Donovan and Fiona Fitzsimons bring academic excellence to genealogical practice-based frameworks”by Lorna Moloney.Booking for the 2015 Summer School will open on 24th July, later this month.

See thewebsite  for more.


 Lunch time talks in the National Library of Ireland

This August at theNational Library of Ireland,Eneclann andAncestor Network will host a feast for family history fans! It’s the return of the Twentyx20 lunch-time talks. Each talk is a short introduction to a key area, source or research method in Irish family history. The Q&A session will give you direct access to the experts.

Read more about these talks In this months edition of Irish Lives Remembered here :https://flipflashpages.uniflip.com/3/71043/333233/pub/html5.html

 


The Genealogy Event Limerick

2014 recognises Limerick as the “City of Culture” and the 3rd weekend in August sees the beginning of National Heritage Week
so what better way to celebrate both than with,

The Genealogy Event!
This two day event promises to be a real humdinger!

Information sessions on a broad range of Irish genealogy topics will be given by some of the top experts in the industry. The Eneclann duo, Fiona Fitzsimons and Brian Donovan will also be there :)

“The event has been set up to help genealogists and family historians at all levels and bring together people from around the world with Irish roots,” says BBNY Group founder, Bridget Bray.

Introductory and advanced sessions will focus on surname origins, genetics and genealogy, civil, church and military records.
For those who really want to dig deep, there are expert sessions on the Registry of Deeds, and Irish sources for children in care 1840s to 1990s.
The U.S.National Archives (NARA) will also make a rare appearance in Ireland, to introduce the use of U.S. immigration and Naturalization records.

 

In addition toEneclann, expert speakers at the event will include Tony Browne (local historian), Paul Cotter (surnames expert) Eileen O’ Duill (Civil rights expert), Lorna Moloney (U.C.C Genealogy Summer School & Merriman Research) and Paddy Waldron (Limerick/Clare Expert). Organisations present will include IARC, the LDS, NARA and Roots Ireland.The event has many experts who will be on hand to offer guidance and advice.

This two day event will take place inThe Strand Hotel, Limerick, Buy your ticket today and experience “The Genealogy Event 2014″

 

For more information on

The Genealogy Event
visit them onFacebook Or theirWebsite.

 


World War One Roadshow at Trinity College Dublin

Trinity College Dublin in partnership withRTÉ Radio One and theNational Library of Ireland is hosting a Family History Collections Day of World War One memorabilia this Saturday, July 12th where members of the public are invited to bring in family items, letters and mementos related to the war for authentication and archiving by a team of experts,

Paul Manzor fromEneclann and Aoife O’ Connor from findmypast  will be there to provide research advice and guide you through the records of ancestors that served in World War 1

findmypast will provide free access throughout the day to all their World War 1 records.
Don’t forget to pop over to both our stands and say hello!

It looks like it’s going to be one very eventful day.  For more information and a full time-table of the day, click on the image.

 


Brian Mitchell publishes new book

Tracing Derry-Londonderry roots.

‘Londonderry’ sketch by John Nixon circa 1790

Brian Mitchell, the best-selling author of A New Genealogical Atlas of Ireland, has a new book out, for anyone tracing their family history in the city and county of Derry/ Londonderry.Tracing Derry~Londonderry Roots was published in the U.S. earlier this year.

“Genealogy has great potential to reconnect Derry with its Diaspora and as a promotional tool to potential visitors and tour groups”, says Brian Mitchell.
“Just recently I was communicating by email with Jim O’Reilly of Chicago who is one of 700 direct descendants of Charles Curran who emigrated from Brockagh (2 miles south of Eglinton), via Derry, to USA in 1865. This June they are holding a family reunion in Pittsburgh; the seed has been sown to visit Derry and their ancestral home in the future”  Brian Mitchell,

Contact him at (genealogy@derrycity.gov.uk),

Brian’s book is now available to buyhere


Expert workshops for CPD conclude for the summer.

This last week the Expert workshops series concluded for the summer, with two workshops on genetic genealogy given by Dr. Gerard Corcoran.
The series of Expert workshops for Continuous Professional Development began in April 2014.

Already we’ve held ten workshops, drawing on the expertise of our own GAS membership, as well as overseas speakers including Dr. Liz Rushen (Colonial Duchesses, Fair Game).

Monthly Workshops are held in Trinity College and the National Library of Ireland, both institutions with which Eneclann has a close association.

These free workshops are open to our own GAS membership, but also to other professional genealogists, enthusiasts and independent scholars.

We’re taking the month of August off, but the series will resume in September.

“Maeve and I would like to thank all our speakers who generously gave their time, energy and expertise.
We’ve had a lot of fun in these first few months, and have built up a regular audience.
We hope you’ve enjoyed the workshops as much as we have, and hope to see you again this Autumn”
Fiona Fitzsimons.

“The CPD talks have been tremendously interesting and the workshop format has prompted a worthwhile discussion among attendees”
Maeve Mullin

“The Expert Workshops are well worth the journey from Limerick. We have all tapped into new resources with the different speakers”
Kay Caball

 

 


Chapelizod Art Project update

 

Debbie Chapman is keen to involve the two local schools in theChapelizod Art Project.
She has already completed a workshop with the children of St. Patrick’s National School.
This Monday Debbie will hold a free workshop with the children of St. Laurence’s National School.
Chapelizod Bandroom,11am -12 pm, Monday 14th July.

DRAWING DAY  (all ages)  – Sat 19 July 2014, 2  – 5pm Meet at the Square in Chapelizod Village.  Bring materials or some will be provided. Most suitable drawings will be chosen for inclusion in
the Exhibition  & Project Book in Sept/Oct 2014.

PHOTOGRAPHY  (all ages)  – email your photos of Chapelizod’s ‘Dereliction’ to info@debbiechapman.com by August 31st.
Most suitable ones will be chosen by local photographer Motoko
Fujita for inclusion in the Exhibition  & Project Book in Sept/Oct 2014.

POETRY  (all ages)  – email your poetry or prose compositions to   info@debbiechapman.com for inclusion in the Exhibition  & Project
Book in Sept/Oct 2014.

Check out all the latest updates on the project over on theChapelizod Dereliction facebook page


Research tip of the week

A quirk of registration

If you can’t find a record of birth in your family’s usual parish of residence, it may be because your ancestors gave birth away from home.Traditionally, many women returned to their mother’s house for assistance when they had their first child. The child may then be registered in their mother’s home parish, rather than the family’s usual place of residence.  Another common instance in which a woman gave birth ‘away’ from home, was if she attended the county hospital.The county hospitals shared a campus with the workhouse, and from the 1850s many poor women used it as a ‘lying-in’ hospital. You can make this ‘quirk of registration’ work for you, by searching the baptismal registers of the parish, and from 1864 civil births by the Registrar’s District in which the workhouse campus was situated.

By Research Expert, Fiona Fitzsimons,

 


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Best wishes, The Eneclann Team

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Latest Eneclann Newsletter: 9th of May 2014

Eneclann Newsletter

In this issue:

Twentyx20 Lunchtime Talks.

Irish Lives Rememebred.

Irish Census Records Covering 1821-1851

UCC Summer School

New Digital Downloads at Eneclann

Military History Archive Records.

Research Tip of the Week.

 


 

 

Dear Eneclann customer,

The Return of The Twentyx20 Lunch Time Talks

This August at the National Library of Ireland, Eneclann and Ancestor Network will host a feast for family history fans! It’s the return of theTwentyx20 lunch-time talks.We have assembled a veritable smorgasbord of experts to unlock the richness of Irish family history.

Each talk is a short introduction to a key area, source or research method in Irish family history.  The Q&A session will give you direct access to the experts, to take the mystery out of family history.

Talks start after 1 p.m. every weekday in August.

Click here to see the full list of our speakers.

For more information and for event updates keep on eye on ourWebsite blog and also ourFacebook page as we will be updating these regularly with all the information you will need to know on all our wonderful speakers or you can email us atmarketing@eneclann.ie


Irish Lives remembered.

This monthsIrish Lives Remembered Online Magazine is now out! featuring a three page spread byEneclann Research Expert and Director Fiona Fitzsimons on “The Carlow origins of Carol Ann Duffy, British poet Laureate”, on pages 14&15, Also In this months issue you can read all about The National Archives of Ireland,FindmypastandFamilySearch and the release of pre 1901-Census Records, including many more wonderful articles from the world of Genealogy.


Surviving Irish Census Records Covering 1821-1851 go online for the first time.

New and online for the first time ever inFindmypast’s 100 in 100 campaign, surviving Irish census records.

Listen toEneclann Director Brian Donovan, explain the importance of these new online records, and why he is excited about their publication

Click the image below to head over to ourFacebook page and view all the images from The Launch of the Pre-1901 Online Census records in The National Archives of Ireland where Jimmy Deenihan, TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Frances McGee, Acting Director of the National Archives of Ireland and our very own Brian Donovan were all there along with many more to launch these exciting new records.


Hilary McDonagh and The Genealogy Summer School.

Ancestral Connections 2014 is an International Genealogy summer school developed by Lorna Moloney at ACE – University College Cork, it offers a programme of outstanding quality for those interested in tracing their Irish roots.

All aspects of subjects are covered by a series of presentations and ‘hands on’ workshops given by a selection of Ireland’s leading genealogical lecturers and experts,

This week we caught up with Hilary McDonagh Director ofIrish Ancestry who will be giving a number of interesting talks at the Summer school and asked him to give us a little idea of what he is all about.

Hilary McDonagh will be giving a talk on-Friday the 4th of July: 2pm-2.45pm:
Sons & Children- Genealogy of Irish Childhood.

Have a lookhereat the line up for this amazing summer school.

 


Latest Downloads available at Eneclann

We now have 14 new download releases available on our website
14 new download conversions available, for as little as €1.25, including:
  • Several Parish Register Society publications of registers from Dublin city dating from 1619 (parishes of St. Catharine, St. John, St. Marie, St. Luke, St. Werburgh and St. Nicholas Without)
  • Bram Stoker’s first book
  • Topographical books about Galway, Mayo, Roscommon, etc
  • Local and national histories of Irelan
  • Directories.
You can view and purchase all of our 14 latest download releases over on our website

justclick here to have a look and purchase.


Military History Archive Records.

In this Months edition ofHistory Ireland Magazine, Eneclann’s own Fiona Fitzsimons takes a closer look at the records of the Military History Archive. “If you have a rebel in the family, or a Volunteer ancestor active during the Irish Revolutionary period 1913-1923, this is where you look.” These archives have further information for anyone with family in the Defence Forces since the foundation of the State. “History Ireland” is in all good newsagents and selected bookshops and available to buy now.


Research Tip of the week

Let him be. He learnt the lesson of the land” – Bull McCabe.

Irish people’s obsession with land and property, so beautifully encapsulated by John B. Keane’s play The Field and latterly in the film adaptation, is well known. It’s an obsession that any family history researcher would do well to embrace.

When I first came to genealogy I knew my historical research skills would stand me in good stead, but I failed to appreciate the importance geography plays in the pursuit of ones ancestors.

If you’re unfortunate enough to have an ancestor with a name as common as Mary Murphy, it is often geography that will help you select the records relating to your ancestor and avoid the doppelgangers. The majority of the record sources used by family historians have a geographic element to them and using these, as a means of narrowing your searches, is an essential part of research.

Knowing your civil, parish and townland boundaries can make all the difference in identifying the correct record, not to mention saving time by looking in the wrong place. Don’t forget to check both sides of a boundary if you believe your ancestors lived near one. Equally don’t get too focussed on one location either, remember people did move about.

So while the Bull McCabe may have had a different lesson in mind, the lesson for this researcher was that knowing your geography can make you a better historian.

By:Stephen Peirce.


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Best wishes, The Eneclann Team

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