Tag Archives: nli

Last 5 Reviews for Twentyx20 Lunch-time talks

The following are the last 5 reviews for the Twentyx20 lunch time talks help in the National Library of Ireland for the month of August

16.Brian Donovan

Landlords & Tenants: land and estate records for Irish family history research.

IMG_8395As our scheduled speaker was unable to attend, Eneclann’s own Brian Donovan stepped back into the ring with a talk entitled “Landlords & tenants: Land and estate records for Irish Family History Research.

Brian’s paper gave an overview of the principal land and estate records available for Ireland. In the absence of census records these sources are an essential resource for Irish research. But until recently these sources were poorly understood, difficult to access and interpret. Most researchers are now familiar with Griffith’s Valuation, but still fail to get the full value of the source. Moreover a wealth of data has been recently released online which transforms access and how we can use these records, especially the Landed Estate Court Rentals 1849-85. Moreover, the administration of estates and the authority of the landlord class required more than the maintenance of rentals. It was supported by a judicial system (the magistrates courts) to sustain their position. These archives represent some of the richest resources of information for the population of Ireland in the 19th century.

Brian finished his talk by discussing how the landlord system in Ireland was systematically dismantled as a result of the Land War and through the mechanism of the Land Commission which resulted in a social revolution in Ireland, that has yet to be delivered in Britain.

 

 

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17.Ray Gillespie

Doing Local History

ray talks

It’s difficult to summarise Ray Gillespie’s talk so as to do it justice.  He drew on decades of documentary research, and gave a masterful performance that ranged across 500 years of Irish history, citing sources as diverse as the medieval annals and present-day oral traditions.

In the simplest terms, local history is about examining the story of a person in their community, in a given space and time.

Family history, like local history, is best achieved when we stop looking for individuals, and instead trace people in the context of their family and their wider community.

Ray gave two case-studies, one from the late 19th Century in Donegal, the second from the second quarter of the 1500s.

The first case study is published as a book by Frank Sweeney, The Murder of Connell Boyle, county Donegal, 1898 in the Maynooth Local History Series.  In 1898 the murder of Connell Boyle shocked his community, because it appeared motiveless.  He was a widower, living alone in poverty.  He was not in dispute with his landlord, and was not involved in the land-war or in political agitation.  The community thought they knew ‘who-done-it’ but the code of silence in the face of police enquiries, meant that no-one was ever convicted of his death.

The second case study, also a murder, occurred in 1334.  Magnus Ua Duibhgennain “an eminent historian, was strangled and smothered and concealed in his own house by his own wife and by Brian [Maguire].”  Ray considered the consequences for the murderers, their families and their community.

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18. Mary McAuliffe

Finding women in the records.

Mary talks

In what was one of the finest talks in the season, Mary McAuliffe showed considerable erudition and humour, when she urged the audience to ‘Cherchez les femmes’.

One of the main problems in finding women in the records, is the lack of a paper trail.  The records that survive, focus on men.  This reflects the problem of women’s’ social, political and legal status down through history.  Women are born with their father’s name, and change their names on marriage, and this can make it difficult to trace women in the historic records.

McAuliffe advised us that women are documented, but that very often it’s all about effective use of the records.  We were treated to a whistle-stop tour of many of the documents we associate with family history: census, church and civil records, land records like Griffith’s Valuation and the Tithe Applotment Books.  She then advised us how to ‘cast our net’ more widely, and find lesser known, and less frequently used sources, including diaries, letters, journals, pension applications, some Union records, amongst others.

She concluded by recommending some of the data-bases in the National Archives, in particular the sadly under-used Directory of Sources for Women’s History in Ireland; and advised us all to read the National Library’s own Research Guide for Women in Irish History, which can be found online at www.nli.ie/en/manuscript-research-guides.aspx

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19. Dan Bradley

Niall of the Nine Hostages and the genetic architecture of Irish surnames.

Paternal lineage is traced through the Y Chromosome, while maternal is traced through Mitochondrial DNA.  Surnames are also passed along the male line, so that all things being equal there should be a correlation between the Y DNA and surnames.

Prof. Bradley cited a case study that focused on the Ui Neill Clan in North West Ireland.  The case study drew on over 800 people, randomly selected, from which the following conclusions were drawn:

  •   Y Chromosome genealogy in Irish surname groups usually have a dominant founder.
  •  YDNA indicates that approximately half of all those with the Ui Neill name, or one of the associated surnames derived from the Ui Neill clan group (O’Donnell, Bradley, etc.), are descended from the founder.
  • In Ireland, even common surnames display a foundation pattern, unlike in Britain.
  • Genetic diversity in Irish subjects, indicates that surnames probably originated earlier in Ireland, than in England.

Q.E.D. Ancient genealogy linkages in Ireland are often true.

In the Q&A session that followed, the Prof. revealed that he’s currently working on ancient DNA.  Early indications point to some exciting results!

Those of you interested in ‘this kind of thang’ will be pleased to hear, that Prof. Dan Bradley has already agreed to return in 2015 to talk about his new research findings.

dans talks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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20. Damien Shiels

Uncovering the Irish of the American Civil War.

America is currently commemorating the 150th Anniversary of civil war (1861-1865).  One of the neglected stories in our history, is Irish participation in this conflict.  Official neglect is all the more surprising, considering how Ireland has courted the American connexion.

Between 1861 and 1865 approximately 200,000 Irish fought in the American Civil War: an estimated 180,000 in the Union army; and ca. 20,000 in the Confederate army.

An estimated 20% or 23,600 of the Union Navy were Irish-born.  We don’t yet have comparable figures for the smaller Confederate Navy.

The total number of the Irish that died in this conflict has been estimated at 30,000.

The Irish that fought in the American civil war, were predominantly the ‘Famine Irish’.

In a commanding performance Damian Shiels introduced us to the main sources online to trace the forgotten history of these Irish soldiers.

damian talks

*             *             *             *             *             *

 

This brought to a close the Twentyx20 talks in 2014.

We achieved record audiences this year, consistently higher than in any of the previous years.  A huge thank you to our speakers for their contribution, and also to the audience, many of whom were regulars throughout the month.

“Family history is popular history, but it’s also a discipline that cuts across many branches of learning.  In planning these talks, we wanted to show this multi-faceted aspect of our subject, which draws on archaeology and archives, genealogy and historical geography, genetics, history and professional researchers, writers and bloggers.

Of course the Twentyx20 talks are not simply about family history.  The talks were conceived with the idea that we might bring in a new audience, and persuade them of the enjoyment and simple pleasures that can be found in research.

In 2014 our invited speakers included established names like Patrick Comerford, Else Churchill, Brian Donovan, Jacinta Prunty and Ray Gillespie.  Family history is also a vibrant discipline, and we wanted to showcase emerging new talent like Lorna Moloney, Rhona Murray, Damian Shiels and John Tierney.

Finally, the Twentyx20 talks are a paen to the National Library of Ireland and its’ wonderful staff.  Since 2008 the National Library of Ireland has grown attendance by 85%, despite budgetary cuts of 40% in the same time-frame.  That the Library has continued to draw in a new audience, is a tribute to the dedication and commitment of the public servants that work there.  The Library provides an essential creative space in Dublin City to research, write, think and create plans.”

Cheers,

Fiona

Latest Eneclann Newsletter 29th of September 2014

Eneclann News- September 29th 2014

In this week’s newsletter we offer you more from Eneclann and all that is going on in the world of Irish family history. Recent events include the September Expert Workshop for CPD, in which we raised money for The Jack and Jill Children’s Foundation. And, we announce who our speaker is for the next workshop in the series in October.  We have a radio interview with our own Brian Donovan on Lorna Moloney’s new Genealogy Radio Show to share with you.  We have reviews from our Twentyx20 lunch-time talks in the National Library. Our research tip this week is by Fiona Fitzsimons; and we preview the Back to our Past show at the RDS in October, enjoy 🙂

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Are Smart Cities Making Us Dumb?

On Friday the 26th, at 6pm as part of Discover Research,The Innovation Academy will host Innovation Café, there will be a moderated discussion panel with Trinity academics and alumni including our very own Brian Donovan director of Eneclann. The topic under discussion is “Are Smart Cities Making Us Dumb?”  All are welcome,find out more here

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Expert Workshops

The expert Workshops series resumed in September with a double bill on emigration from the Poor Law Unions, by Kay Caball in Trinity College, and Dr. Gerard Moran in the National Library. The audience that attended both workshops in September raised funds for the Jack and Jill Childrens Foundation here. In October we continue our series of Workshops in Irish Family History, with Claire Bradley.

 

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The Genealogy Radio Show

Our friend and colleague Lorna Moloney has a new radio show The Genealogy Radio Show. Each week she looks at a different aspect of Irish family history live. Listen to a podcast of her recent interview with Eneclann’s Brian Donovan as he talks about  ‘The digital revolution in family history’; you can listen to the full interview here.

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Next 5 Twentyx20 Reviews

We have the next 5 reviews of our Twentyx20 Lunch time talks at the National Library of Ireland that were held in August, We attracted a record audience throughout the month, with our most entertaining line-up yet, Read all about it here.

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Culture Night 2014

Culture Night fell on Friday 19th September this year. A collection of genealogists from Eneclann, Ancestor Network and findmypast Ireland gathered in the National Library of Ireland to provide a free genealogy advisory service to all callers, to hear how our team enjoyed it, Click here.

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Back to our past 2014

In October Eneclann will be exhibiting at Back to our Past at stand 30, 30a, 31 and 31a. Come to our stand to meet our team of expert researchers ready to help you with your family history research, Eneclann’s own Brian Donovan and Fiona Fitzsimons will give talks during the event. We’re also delighted to announce our guest speaker will be renowned genealogist Eileen O’Duill. Find out all you need to know here.

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Research Tip of the week

Each newsletter we offer you a research tip written by one of our expert researcher’s, the hope that we can somehow help you along your genealogy path. This week Fiona Fitzsimons has written a research tip on “Tracing the Irish that fought in the American Civil War using online records”. You can read the full research tip here.

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Latest Eneclann Newsletter, 13th August 2014

Meeting Princess Charlene in the Palace in Monaco

 

Last Winter Tourism Ireland commissioned Eneclann research director Fiona Fitzsimons to research the Irish family history of Princess Charlene of Monaco.

“At the outset, I had no preconceived ideas of what I might find during research”

The Fagan family history.

The Princess’s Irish ancestors were the Fagan family, probably the most successful gentleman-merchants in Dublin in the 1500s and 1600s. The Fagans were wealthy entrepreneurs, who left an indelible mark on the landscape of Dublin city and its’ environs.


The Fagans owned Bulloch Harbour from the 1580s until 1692.
Bulloch Harbour was the deep-sea port for the city of Dublin, and was the source of the Fagan’s immense wealth and influence.

They were involved in the foundation of Trinity College in 1592, and the Phoenix Park in 1662.


The Phoenix Park Dublin. In 1662 Christopher Fagan sold his Manor of Phoenix to the Duke of Ormond, to create a Royal Deer Park.
Photo courtesy Tourism Ireland.

The Fagans fought on the losing side in the Battle of the Boyne, and in 1692 were outlawed and their lands confiscated.  Under the peace terms that ended that War, the Fagans should have been pardoned and given back their lands.  Lord Thomas Coningsby, a corrupt senior government official manipulated the legal system and seized the Fagan’s extensive Dublin estates.

In 1695 the Fagans re-located to Killarney County Kerry, and over generations re-established themselves as merchants, trading out of Cork with the American Colonies and the West Indies.

The last of Princess Charlene’s direct ancestors born in Ireland was Christopher Sullivan Fagan, born in March 1781.  In 1800 at the age of 18 Christopher enlisted as a cadet in the East India Company.

On arrival in India, young Christopher Sullivan Fagan discovered an important family connection that gave him a direct link to the English Governor General.  Christopher’s first cousin, Hyacinth Rolande, was married to Richard Wellesley, Governor General of India 1797-1805.


Hyacinthe Rolande, natural daughter of the Chevalier Fagan. Portrait painted 1791 by Elisabeth le Brun.
Reproduced courtesy of the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco

Christopher Sullivan Fagan rose to the rank of Major General in the Honorable East India Company Service (H.E.I.C.S.).  One of his daughters was Agnes Cecilia Adelaide Fagan born in Bengal in 1821; married in Calcutta in 1842 to Charles Arthur Nicolson.

These are Princess Charlene’s great x 3 grandparents, and it was their generation that first established a connection to Africa.

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Meeting a Princess.

From L-R: Prince Albert; Princess Charlene; Finola O’Mahony, head of Europe; Tourism Ireland,Rory Montgomery Irish ambassador to France; and Fiona Fitzsimons of Eneclann.
Earlier this Summer I was asked if I could travel to Monaco, to present the Princess’s family history.  The meeting was eventually scheduled to take place in the Palace gardens at 6pm on Tuesday 29th July.  Rory Montgomery the Irish ambassador to France, and Finola O’Mahoney of Tourism Ireland would also be there.

A gathering storm on the afternoon of the 29th meant that on our arrival at the Palace, we were shown into a private family sitting room.  It was a lovely room, comfortable and domestic, where I felt at ease.  The surfaces teemed with family photographs, including rather surreally, the late Princess Grace of Monaco.

The princely couple arrived with little or no fanfare and after introductions we sat and I described to them some of the personalities of the Princess’s Irish ancestors, and their exploits across three continents.

In the course of our conversation the couple’s interest rose higher and higher, and they asked very many questions to fix key details.  We talked for over an hour, and towards the end of the interview Princess Charlene asked with obvious delight if Ireland would now claim her as one of our own.

The Irish ambassador answered in the affirmative, presenting the Princess with a Certificate of Irish Heritage.

On the way home, I got a taxi from Dublin Airport and mulled it all over.  It occurred to me that even behind a palace wall, a Princess can be as delighted as a child on Christmas morning, to discover her Irish heritage.

by Fiona Fitzsimons
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Click on the link below and have a listen to a short clip of Fiona’s interview on the research of  Princess Charlene.

Radio Riviera News clip

 

 


Lunch time talks in NLI so far.

 

The Twentyx20 Lunch-time talks are proving very popular with numbers of over 50 each day.

What’s great to see this year is that it’s not just the same familiar faces, we’re reaching a fresh audience interested in family history.

On Tuesday the 5th of August,Catherine Murphy T.D. attended. She was enthused to see such a large crowd in the Library to attend the talks.

Reviews

On Friday the 1st of August, Brian Donovan spoke about the digital revolution in Irish family history.  Since 2003, over 120 million historic Irish records have been digitised and published online.  Brian gave an overview of the key collections online for genealogy research. He discussed the trail-blazing “Partnership Model” adopted by findmypast, that ensures the rights of data-owners (of records).
Online publishing has improved access to the records; made research easier; and transformed genealogy from a minority pursuit into a popular hobby with a mass audience.

On Tuesday the 5th of August, in a delightfully witty and wise talk, Patrick Comerford informed us there’s more to parish records than registers. Parish records tell us more about our religious identity and social conditions in the past.  The records
also show that Ireland was a pluralist society beforeNe Temere.Family history has become main-stream because in the modern world, we use it to construct our own personal identity.

For anyone who missed Patrick’s talk last Tuesday, but who would like to hear more of his ideas on family history, See

http://www.patrickcomerford.com/search/label/Family%20History

Reviews for speakers from the 6th of August will be included in our next newsletter.

There are still so many wonderful talks to come, here is a preview of  the week to come (11th to 15th)

Monday 11thPaul McCotter,N.U.I Cork,Researching the history of Irish surnames and clan-names.

Tuesday 12thElse Churchill,Society of Genealogists,The exile of Erin, researching the poor Irish in Victorian London

Wednesday 13thAudrey Collins,National Archives U.K,Under-used Irish records in the National Archives in England

Thursday 14thHilary McDonagh,Ancestor Network,Genealogy and sporting records-from sporting Laurels to Family Trees.

Friday 15thJacinta Prunty,N.U.I Maynooth,Did you come from Dublin dear? Understanding Dublin city through maps.

 

 


Free genealogy advisory service

 

 

The joint consortium ofEneclann andAncestorNetwork continues to provide a wide and comprehensive range of expertise in The National Library of Ireland all summer to anyone looking for help and advice in tracing their family history,

The service is free to all visitors of the Library.

9.30 a.m. to 4.45 p.m. Monday to Friday,

9.30 a.m. to 12.45 on Saturday.

See you there!

 

 


National Heritage Week.

 

Venue:Dublin City Library and Archive.Address:144 Pearse Street, Dublin, Ireland.

Is Booking Required:No.

Admission Fee:Free.

JoinfindmypastandEneclann for a free family history beginner’s day. On the day you can expect

Free access to records on findmypast.
Demonstrations on how to use the online records.
Genealogy advice.
Short introductory lectures.
Every hour during the event you can attend talks from our experts about all things family history. Here’s how the lectures are scheduled:

Time Topic Lecturer
12pm Where to start when building your family tree Fiona Fitzsimons,
Eneclann
1pm Census, land and birth marriage and death records – the building blocks of Irish family history Brian Donovan, Eneclann
2pm Add some colour to your family tree with military, crime and newspaper records Aoife O’Connor, findmypast
3pm Tracing your ancestors who moved abroad Cliona Weldon, findmypast

 


The Genealogy Event

What better way to celebrate Limerick’s status as 2014 City of Culture, and the start of National Heritage week, than with

The Genealogy Event!
This two day event promises to be a real humdinger!

Information sessions on a broad range of Irish genealogy topics will be given by some of the top experts in the industry. The Eneclann duo, Fiona Fitzsimons and Brian Donovan will also be there 😉

“The event has been set up to help genealogists and family historians at all levels and bring together people from around the world with Irish roots,” says BBNY Group founder, Bridget Bray.

Introductory and advanced sessions will focus on surname origins, genetics and genealogy, civil, church and military records.

For those who really want to dig deep, there are expert sessions on the Registry of Deeds, and Irish sources for children in care 1840s to 1990s.

The U.S.National Archives (NARA) will also make a rare appearance in Ireland, to introduce the use of U.S. immigration and Naturalization records.

Have a listen below toLyric FM, as they promote the event with an ad.

The Genealogy Event 2014.

 


Research Tip of the week!

I’m constantly surprised by the number of people undertaking genealogical research who have their notes written on the backs of envelopes, scraps of paper etc.  My tip for this week is get yourself a sturdy notebook (ring-bound notebooks eventually disintegrate),  and record all your family history details in there.  When you do come across any information relevant to the family always note the place e.g., NAI (National Archives of Ireland), GRO (General Register Office), date, and all the relevant details. For example if you searched the baptismal register for Mallow, record the exact years you looked at, any relevant baptism to your family, and the positive number of the microfilm in the National Library of Ireland.  I recently spoke to someone who had been searching for 12 years for estate records he had previously seen that related to his family.  He hadn’t written down the manuscript number or where exactly he had seen them. We did eventually find the correct estate records but it’s a salutary lesson!

 

By Helen Moss,

resident research expert,

Eneclann.

Eneclann & Ancestor Network make it a hat trick!

Free genealogy advisory service in the National Library of Ireland, Summer 2014.

National_Museum_of_Ireland

 

The joint consortium of Eneclann and Ancestor Network are delighted to announce that they have been selected by the National Library of Ireland to enhance its provision of Summer genealogy services, following a competitive tendering process.

Speaking on behalf of the National Library of Ireland, Honora Faul said today:

“We are delighted to welcome back Eneclann & Ancestor Network, to support and enhance our Summer genealogy service.  It’s an invaluable service for anyone tracing their family history.”

Fiona Fitzsimons, Eneclann:Eneclann_Logo

“We’re very happy to have been chosen to provide the genealogy advisory service again this summer.  We look forward to working alongside Francis O’Carroll and Christina McDonnell, our professional colleagues from the Library,”

“In Summer 2012 and 2013 we saw a significant rise in the numbers that availed of the genealogy service.  We hope to welcome a record number of visitors to the Library this summer.”

Hilary Mc Donagh founder and director of Irish Ancestry:ancestor network logo

“We are delighted to be part of this wonderful role for a third year running.  It’s a privilege for us to assist visitors to the Library and to help them trace their family history.  Being part of the Library’s genealogy service allows us to share our expertise, but it means we come face to face with the ordinary Joe or Josephine, and learn what they are most interested in.  We love to team up with our friends in Eneclann: both organisations can work together to help the public with all their research needs”

Summer hours for the genealogy advisory service in the National Library of Ireland commences Tuesday 2nd June 2014.nli logo

The service is free to all visitors to the Library.

9.30 a.m. to 4.45 p.m. Monday to Friday,

9.30 a.m. to 12.45 on Saturday.

 

www.ancestornetwork.ie

1 Hyde Park Avenue, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland

Tel: +353 (0)87 0505296

Finding Forgotten Irish WWI Soldiers

The expert workshops launched in April by Eneclann in partnership with Ancestor Network, are proving very popular. But don’t just take our word for it, here’s some of the feedback we’ve received from those attending:

Phil Stokes, Dublin, attended Jim Ryan’s workshop,
Ghosts of the Estates:
“Great talk, I immediately had information that helped my research”

Michael Rooney, co. Down attended Fiona Fitzsimons’ workshop
Records of Children in Care 1840s to 1990s:
A comprehensive introduction to records for ‘Lost Children’ …. It explored the challenges that genealogists face when researching in this area as well as offering potential solutions to problems encountered.”

This month our speaker isMaeve Mullin, B.Sc.

with a workshop on
Finding Forgotten Irish WWI Soldiers: a case-study of Glaslough, co. Monaghan.
In this workshop Maeve Mullin uses as a case-study, her own community of Glaslough, county Monaghan, to recover the names and personal histories of locals that fought and died in WWI.

The workshop takes place on two dates:

  • 3pm on Thursday 5th June, in the Emmet Theatre, Arts Block Trinity College.
  • 2pm on Saturday 7th June, in the Trustee’s Room, National Library of Ireland, Kildare St.

Description:

Even as the centenary commemorations for WWI begin, historians still can’t agree on the number of Irish war dead. The official figures  are 49,300, but even these have been challenged as being both too low, and too high.
In this workshop Maeve Mullin will guide you through the maze of sources that document the Irish men and women that fought and died in the First World War.

Using individual stories, Maeve demonstrates how even a ‘burnt’ service record, can retain enough evidence to allow researchers to link up to other related records.

“In researching the WWI soldiers from Glaslough I discovered a wealth of records.  The workshop will focus on how this can be achieved for everyone’s home place.”

All workshops are free, but as spaces are limited, these are ticketed events.

To apply for a free ticket, please emailworkshop@localhost and indicate whether you want to attend the workshop taking place in Trinity College or the National Library.

Latest Eneclann Newsletter: 26th of May 2014

Eneclann Newsletter
In this issue:

 

  • World War I & Independent.ie
  • GAS Workshop for June.
  • UCC Genealogy School
  • Derry-Londonderry:Gateway to a New World.
  • Database of over 500 directories.
  • Family Tree designs.
  • Research Tip of the week.

 

 

Dear Eneclann customer,

Eneclann talk World War I to Independent.ie

‘Hundreds of thousands of other people in this country have a relative who fought in that “war to end all wars”

As John Meagher fromThe Independent.ie discovers, researchers here atEneclann are hard at work digitising the records of Ireland’s World War I dead. Brian Donovan, Eneclann CEO, talks about how soldiers and civilians of every nationality were slaughtered in their millions.
“They deserve to be remembered”
Independent.ie Interview

‘Virtually every town and village had someone who died in the war’

Read Brians full articles on the Eneclann Blog

Finding records for soldiers and those who were involved in WWI


Continuous Professional Development in Irish Family History

The expert workshops launched in April by Eneclann in partnership with Ancestor Network, are proving very popular. But don’t just take our word for it, here’s some of the feedback we’ve received from those attending:

Phil Stokes, Dublin, attended Jim Ryan’s workshop,

Ghosts of the Estates:

“Great talk, I immediately had information that helped my research”

Michael Rooney, co. Down attended Fiona Fitzsimons’ workshop

Records of Children in Care 1840s to 1990s:

“A comprehensive introduction to records for ‘Lost Children’ …. It explored the challenges that genealogists face when researching in this area as well as offering potential solutions to problems encountered.”

This month our speaker isMaeve Mullin, B.Sc.

with a workshop on
Finding Forgotten Irish WWI Soldiers: a case-study of Glaslough, co. Monaghan.

In this workshop Maeve Mullin uses as a case-study, her own community of Glaslough, county Monaghan, to recover the names and personal histories of locals that fought and died in WWI.

The workshop takes place on two dates:

3pm on Thursday 5th June, in the Emmet Theatre, Arts Block Trinity College, and2pm on Saturday 7th June, in the Trustee’s Room, National Library of Ireland, Kildare St.

Description.
Even as the centenary commemorations for WWI begin, historians still can’t agree on the number of Irish war dead. The official figures  are 49,300, but even these have been challenged as being both too low, and too high.

In this workshop Maeve Mullin will guide you through the maze of sources that document the Irish men and women that fought and died in the First World War.

Using individual stories, Maeve demonstrates how even a ‘burnt’ service record, can retain enough evidence to allow researchers to link up to other related records.

“In researching the WWI soldiers from Glaslough I discovered a wealth of records.  The workshop will focus on how this can be achieved for everyone’s home place.

All workshops are free, but as spaces are limited, these are ticketed events.

To apply for a free ticket, please emailworkshop@localhost and indicate whether you want to attend the workshop taking place in Trinity College or the National Library.

           __________________________________________

Maeve Mullins and The UCC Genealogy School

 

Ancestral Connections 2014 is an International Genealogy summer school developed by Lorna Moloney at ACE – University College Cork, it offers a programme of outstanding quality for those interested in tracing their Irish roots.
All aspects of subjects are covered by a series of presentations and ‘hands on’ workshops given by a selection of Ireland’s leading genealogical lecturers and experts,

This week we caught up with Maeve Mullins who will also be giving a talk at The UCC Genealogy School.

 

Maeve Mullins will be giving a talk on-

Friday the 4th of July: 2.45pm -3.45pm

“Valuation office-A precious Gem”

Have a lookhere at the line up for this amazing summer school.


Derry-Londonderry-Gateway to a New World

 

Derry~Londonderry: Gateway to a New World – The story of emigration from the Foyle by sail and steam has just been published in the US by genealogist and Irish emigration expert Brian Mitchell.

Brian Mitchell recounts the history of departures from the port of Derry-Londonderry from the late 17th century to the year 1939, when the last transatlantic steamer sailed from the port. Derry is ideally situated at head of the River Foyle, twenty-four miles long and only two miles wide at its head, a configuration that provided sailing vessels with a harbor of refuge. During the age of steam, her westerly situation gave her a monetary advantage with coal-burning vessels.

“I would estimate that 6 million Americans can trace their descent to a Scots-Irish ancestor who departed the port of Derry”

published in US on 15 May 2014 by Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore,www.genealogical.com

You can purchase Brians book now for just $11here


Database of over 500 Directories

Shane Wilson andJoe Buggy have recently released aDatabase of over 550 links to Historic Directories of Ireland available on free and subscription websites,it also includes directories for purchase on CD or download. Details shown include directory date, titles byEneclann,findmypast andOrigins.net and a direct link to relevant website. Online directories may be available as transcripts, ebooks (pdf, FlipBook etc), images or searchable databases.

To access the database,click here.

 


The perfect end to your family history research

We have teamed up with Tony Hennessy ofGreat Great Great Family Trees to offer you the perfect finishing touches to your family tree.
AfterEneclann have researched your family tree and created a genealogical report for you or perhaps you have carried out your own genealogical investigations, why not let Tony Hennessy from “Great Great Great Family Trees” turn the findings into a handsome family tree. A simple, functional family tree can provide visual clarity to a densely populated report. A ‘presentation’ type family tree, which is ideal for framing, can be admired, cherished, shared and passed on. It also makes a very thoughtful gift for some one special.

Tell me more about how I get my Family Tree designed by Tony Hennessy


Research Tip of the Week

One of the positive ‘side-effects’ of the digital revolution in family history, is that we expect to find out more about an individual or family than ever before.  Our research-team are frequently asked if it’s ever possible to discover anything about an ancestor’s personality? Like all Irish research, this depends very much on the records that have survived down to the present day.

Anyone lucky enough to have letters or a diary will expect to be able to discern something of the writer’s personality. Even marginal notes in a family bible or scribbled on the back of photos can sometimes communicate your ancestors’ inner thoughts and feelings.

Other sources where you may find flashes of personality include newspaper accounts, particularly where the story covers dramatic events in which an ancestor was an eye-witness, and in the testimony recorded in court records.

Even in the most structured official records, you will occasionally find flashes of personality.

Historically, people have sometimes chosen to settle scores in their last will and testament. The 1775 will of Abraham Hill of Bray county Wicklow, indicates a rather waspish individual.  Hill left his ‘reputed son’ William Hill one British shilling “to show him that he had remembrance that there was such a person.”

Heads of household often make playful remarks in the Census returns. In the 1901 Census of Ireland, Jeremiah Heffernan of Cork recorded the marital status of Madge, his 19 year old daughter, as “on the look-out.”

While the 1911 Census return of the De Valera family may reveal something of their household politics.  Nobody told Sineád, Bean DeValera that she wasn’t joint ‘head of family’ with her husband.  She was joint signatory of the original 1911 Census return, to the obvious horror of the enumerator, who scratched out her name and inserted a ‘correct tick’ beside her husband’s signature.

Sometimes the documents prove that we don’t always see ourselves as others see us. In a recent case that involved the Valuation Office Cancelled Books, I found a comment on the family I was researching, made by the evaluator:

“I never had business to do with such a fighting nasty lot for the hour I was with them could hardly keep them from blood-shedding.  The valuation is as fast [secure] as I could make it”

1884 Valuator Geo. Innes[?],Drumahaire, co. Leitrim, Union of Manorhamilton.

By: Eneclann Research Director, Fiona Fitzsimons.

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Best wishes, The Eneclann Team

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The Return of The Twentyx20 Lunch Time Talks

lunch time talks

This August at the National Library of Ireland, Eneclann and Ancestor Network will host a feast for family history fans! It’s the return of the

Twentyx20 lunch-time talks.

“We have assembled a veritable smorgasbord of experts to unlock the richness of Irish family history” said Fiona Fitzsimons, organiser of the lecture series, and Research Director at Eneclann, “We are delighted to be welcoming back the Twentyx20 Lunch-time talks at the National Library of Ireland this August and hope you will all enjoy some of the exciting topic’s we have lined up for you”

Each talk is a short introduction to a key area, source or research method in Irish family history. The Q&A session will give you direct access to the experts, to take the mystery out of family history.

Talks start after 1p.m every weekday in August:

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20x20 newsletter

Here is the List of the speakers

  • Tuesday 5thRev. Patrick Comerford, Blogger, Trinity College Dublin, Hatch Match and beyond…finding trails and tales in Parish records
  • Wednesday 6thBrian Mitchell,L’ Derry Archives, shipping records and their usefulness when searching for your ancestors.
  • Thursday 7thLorna Moloney,Merriman Research, The Genealogy of Gaelic clans: sources records and evidence-11th to 17th century
  • Friday 8thAoife O’Connor, Author, Yesterday’s Children: Discover your ancestor’s childhood.
  • Monday 11thPaul McCotter, N.U.I Cork, Researching the history of Irish surnames and clan-names
  • Tuesday 12thElse Churchill, Society of Genealogists, The exile of Erin, researching the poor Irish in Victorian London,
  • Wednesday 13thAudrey Collins, National Archives U.K, Under-used Irish records in the National Archives in England.
  • Thursday 14thHilary McDonagh, Ancestor Network, Genealogy and sporting records-from sporting Laurels to Family Trees.
  • Friday 15thJacinta Prunty, N.U.I Maynooth, Did you come from Dublin dear? Understanding Dublin city through maps
  • Monday 18thRhona Murray, Ancestry.com, using Ancestry.com to trace your family History.
  • Wednesday 20thEllen O’Flaherty, Trinity College Dublin, Using the College Archives for family history research.
  • Thursday 21stIan Tester, British Newspaper Archive, Digitising Irish newspapers: how we bring Ireland’s past stories back to life.
  • Wednesday 27thMary McAuliffe, N.U.I. Dublin, Finding women in the records.
  • Thursday 28thDan Bradley, Trinity College Dublin, Niall of the Nine Hostages and the genetic architecture of Irish surnames.

 

For more information and for event updates keep on eye on our- Website blog and also our Facebook page as we will be updating these regularly with all the information you will need to know, and if you are not already signed up to our newsletter then we suggest you do so, as we will be updating you with all the event information plus much more here too. you can also email us at marketing@localhost

See you then 🙂

29th of April, latest Eneclann Newsletter

Eneclann Newsletter

In this issue:

UCC Summer School.

The Genealogy Event.

Eneclann welcome Dr Liz Rushen to the nli

Tony Hennessey, Family Tree designs

GAS talk with Dr Jim Ryan

Research Tip of the week.


 

 

Dear Eneclann customer, this week we bring you

Sean O’ Duill and the UCC Genealogy School.

Ancestral Connections 2014 is an International Genealogy summer school developed by Lorna Moloney at ACE – University College Cork, it offers a programme of outstanding quality for those interested in tracing their Irish roots.

All aspects of subjects are covered by a series of presentations and ‘hands on’ workshops given by a selection of Ireland’s leading genealogical lecturers and experts,

This week we caught up with Lecturer Sean O’ Duill who will be giving a number of interesting talks at the Summer school and asked him to give us a little idea of what he is all about.

Seans Talks are on:

Monday 30th of June, 3.15-4.45pm:Matchmakers & Marriage Customs in 19th century Ireland.

 Monday 30th of June, 5.00-6.00pm:Death and Burial Customs.For more information and a full timetable go to the

ucc .ie

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The Genealogy Event

2014 recognises Limerick as the “City of Culture” and the 3rd weekend in August starts the “National Heritage Week”  and what better way to celebrate both than with,

The Genealogy Event

This two day event promises to share with you, information sessions on a broad range of Irish genealogy-related topics from some of the top experts in the industry, including Eneclann’s very own Research Experts Fiona Fitzsimons and Brian Donovan

“The event has been set up to help genealogists and family historians at all levels and bring together people from around the world with Irish roots,” says BBNY Group founder, Bridget Bray.

Sessions will focus on civil and church records, immigration and passenger lists, military records, surname origins, using DNA, and resources available at Ireland’s National Library and National Archives.

In addition toEneclann, experts from Limerick Genealogy, Roots Ireland, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and the Irish Ancestry Research Centre (IARC), as well as other organizations, will be on hand to offer guidance and advice.

This two day event will take place inThe Strand Hotel Co. Limerick, Buy your ticket today and experience “The Genealogy Event 2014″

buy tickets here The Genealogy Event 2014

For more information on

The Genealogy Event
visit them onFacebook Or theirWebsite.


Eneclann welcome Dr Liz Rushen to their workshop

In our last newsletter, we announced the collaboration between Eneclann and Ancestor Network, to create a regular series of expert workshops.

The free monthly workshops are for an audience of professional genealogists and independent scholars.  The workshops are held in city-centre venues, in Trinity College Dublin and the National Library of Ireland.

This month, we were delighted to welcome author Elizabeth Rushen on Thursday 24th April to the NLI, Kildare St.  The workshop took place, the day after the launch of Dr. Liz Rushen’s latest book, Colonial Duchesses, by the Australian ambassador, Doctor Ruth Adler.

Liz Rushen has written extensively on female migration to Australia in the pre Famine period.  In her latest work, Colonial Duchesses, the focus is primarily, but not exclusively, on the voyages of the Duchess of Northumberland, from Cork and Dublin, to Australia in the 1830s.

A ‘bounty-system’ was set up to encourage migration of young Irish and English women to Australia.  By the 1820s and 30s, over 70% of the population in Australia was male, and in this instance the bounty-system was used to try and redress the demographic imbalance in the colony. Irish women between the ages of 18 and 30 and of good health were offered free passage to emigrate to this far flung colony.  The proposition did not include an automatic offer of employment in the colony.

Liz Rushen’s work is testament to the enormous courage these women displayed in choosing to take up the offer to leave hearth and home for a life so very far away and also to the contribution they subsequently made to Australian life.

Over 4,000 women took up the offer and Dr. Rushen’s research attempted to follow the lives of these Irish women in the colonies. Her passion for her topic – her girls – was tangible, and this together with the focus she brought to the lives of these women illuminated the family history at the core of Irish Australian emigration.

Dr. Liz Rushen’s micro-history approach makes a significant contribution to our knowledge of Irish Australian emigration in the pre Famine period and will be of benefit to professional genealogists working on Irish-Australian case-studies.

Carmel Gilbride MA
Research Manager, Eneclann.

The workshops are ticketed free events, and anyone who would like to attend should apply by email to familyhistoryworkshop@localhost


Tony Hennessey and his Family Tree designs

Are you looking for a thoughtful present for a special person?  A three or four generation Descendant Tree to include all the children and grandchildren – and with photos too – would be a unique and meaningful gift or maybe you just want to have your special family tree all to yourself,

According to Tony Hennessy of Great Great Great Family Trees “There are many different types of family trees and many variations in size, style, number of generations and inclusions amounting to an almost infinite number of possibilities”  Tony specialises in drawing family tree charts and has a great way of capturing your family tree and brining it to life visually,

Take thesesimple steps and get your Family Tree drawn up today.


Gas Workshops

In our last newsletter, we broke the news that Eneclann and Ancestor Network had set up a series of monthly workshops to provide Continuous Professional Development for professional genealogists, independent scholars and engaged amateurs.
The next workshop will be a GAS talk with Dr. Jim Ryan, talking about landed estate records in a paper entitled Ghosts of the Estates.
The workshop will take place at 5pm on Thursday May 8th in the Emmet Theatre Trinity College Dublin, and at 2pm on Saturday May 10th in the Trustees Room in the National Library of Ireland Kildare St.

The events are free and open to the public, but they are ticketed events so anyone who wants to attend should contact us at familyhistoryworkshop@localhost

 


Research Tip of The week

By comparison with other (lucky) jurisdictions, Irish death certificates at the GRO do not record a great deal of information.Other jurisdictions may record the name of the deceased parents and so forth. Nonetheless, death certificates may add to our knowledge.
The hope always is that the informant on the death may be a hitherto unknown family member, perhaps supplying the married name of a daughter.  Sometimes the address might place the family at a location hitherto unknown.  Of course the cause of death may be of interest to our searches, depending on the nature of our enquiry.

It goes without saying that the age of the deceased is an important piece of information. Although the given age has to be treated with a degree of caution, it can act as a rough guide to the year of birth of the deceased.  In that way we can sometimes bring our family back in to an earlier century.
You might think that the marital status of the deceased should not contain too many surprises.  After all there are only three options here, married, widowed or single.

We have seen instances where the marital status was recorded incorrectly as single where we had incontrovertible evidence to the contrary. So caution is the watchword here.

We have also seen where the marital status was indicated as ‘married ‘suggesting that the known spouse survived.    When the believed spouse could not be found in either the death or census records we had to consider that the deceased had been widowed and had remarried.  Finding the second marriage of the deceased in civil registration brought us back to an earlier generation where the first (church) marriage record had not. So, obtaining a death certificate may contribute to our knowledge in unexpected ways.

By: Carmel Gilbride

 


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Best wishes, The Eneclann Team

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