Tag Archives: History Ireland Magazine

Latest Eneclann Newsletter: 1st of July 2014

Eneclann Newsletter

In this issue:

UCC Genealogy Q&A with Stuart Rosenblatt

The Genealogy Event 2014

Expert workshop with Dr. Gerard Corcoran

Chapelizod dereliction project with Debbie Chapman

Latest downloads at Eneclann

Kindred Lines by Fiona Fitzsimons

Research Tip of the week


Dear Eneclann customer,

Stuart Rosenblatt and the UCC Genealogy School

Ancestral Connections 2014 is an International Genealogy summer school developed by Lorna Moloney at ACE – University College Cork, it offers a programme of outstanding quality for those interested in tracing their Irish roots. All aspects of subjects are covered by a series of presentations and ‘hands on’ workshops given by a selection of Ireland’s leading genealogical lecturers and experts.Eneclann’s very own directors Fiona Fitzsimons & Brian Donovan will also be giving talks at the Summer school.

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Brian Donovan: Tuesday 1st July at >

2pm: ‘Usingfindmypast.ie

 for family history research: court prison land records and more’

Fiona Fitzsimons: Tuesday 1st July at >

3pm: ‘Online sources for Irish family history research and how to use them’

4pm:  ‘Tracing records of children in care 1840s to 1990s.’

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This week we caught up with Stuart Rosenblatt of theIrish Jewish Genealogical societywho will  be giving a talk atThe UCC Genealogy School .


Stuarts’ talk will be on:

Hidden Irish Jewish Records.

   Thursday the 3rd of July at 2pm-2.45pm.


The Genealogy Event 2014

2014 recognises Limerick as the “City of Culture” and the 3rd weekend in August starts the “National Heritage Week”  and what better way to celebrate both than with,


This two day event promises to share with you, information sessions on a broad range of Irish genealogy-related topics from some of the top experts in the industry, including Eneclann’s very own Research Experts Fiona Fitzsimons and Brian Donovan,

“The event has been set up to help genealogists and family historians at all levels and bring together people from around the world with Irish roots,” says BBNY Group founder, Bridget Bray.

Sessions will focus on civil and church records, immigration and passenger lists, military records, surname origins, using DNA, and resources available at Ireland’s National Library and National Archives.

In addition toEneclann, experts from Limerick Genealogy, Roots Ireland, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and the Irish Ancestry Research Centre (IARC),will be on hand to offer guidance and advice.

The Genealogy event has added a new conference session in partnership with the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA).
It’s of particular interest to anyone engaged in ‘reverse genealogy’ and trying to trace the descendants of ancestral relatives that left Ireland and settled overseas.
Dorothy Dougherty, Programme director of the National Archives in New York City will be speaking about U.S. naturalisation records, Irish Famine records, and other key sources held by NARA.

This two day event will take place inThe Strand Hotel Co. Limerick, Buy your ticket today and experience “The Genealogy Event 2014″

buy tickets here The Genealogy Event 2014

For more information visit them on theirFacebookOr theirWebsite.


Expert workshops continue in Irish family history

In association withTrinity College DublinandThe National Library of Ireland

Our speaker for the month of July will be Dr. Gerard Corcoran, Irish representative for theInternational Society of Genetic Genealogy.

Gerard has been involved in genetic genealogy for many years and has agreed to give two workshops on differing aspects of this fascinating subject.

 

The workshops will take place next week (beginning 30th June).

3pm on Thursday 3rd July, in Room 4050A on level 4, in the Arts Block, Trinity College Dublin, and

2pm on Saturday 5th July, in the Trustee’s Room, National Library of Ireland, Kildare St.

Genetic genealogy provides a glimmer of hope for our diaspora who are unsure of where in Ireland their ancestors came from.

Description:

Trinity workshop:
Using genetic genealogy to break down the brick walls of traditional genealogy.

National Library workshop.

Connecting the Irish Diaspora using Genetic Genealogy

All workshops are free, but as spaces are limited, these are ticketed events.

Anyone who would like to attend this free workshop should apply for a ticket by writing toworkshop@localhost
Tickets will be assigned on a first come basis.

Please let us know whether you will be at the Trinity College or the NLI event

Thanks, and hope to see you all there.


Chapelizod artist, Debbie Chapman

 

CHAPELIZOD DERELICTION

 

Debbie Chapman is a Chapelizod artist, and is running a project that will be exploring the issue of dereliction in Chapelizod, and the fact that so many buildings have been left empty and derelict, even while there’s a housing crisis.

 

Eneclann is providing historical research on who’s lived in the village of Chapelizod in the last 150 years.This is a Community Based Arts Project responding to the large number of derelict buildings in Chapelizod Village, Dublin and it’s environs. Debbie will be drawing on the real stories of past lives as the inspiration for her art.Recently, Dublin council bought a derelict site with ruined houses from the early 1700s, to redevelop.
The council has put a hoarding up outside these houses, and Debbie Chapman has been asked to design and paint the hoarding.

The purpose of this project is to explore the impact of decline and deterioration of historic buildings at the centre of Chapelizod’s village and through shared artistic practice create a strong sense of place within the current community.

The intended outputs of the project are to create artistic interventions instilled with community consciousness and deliver a series of community arts events, which will have a positive impact on local people, affected by the decline in their immediate environment.

Large wooden cut-outs with painted images from the past will be attached to the hoarding.

The project will culminate in a collaborative Visual Arts Exhibition to be held in the village accompanied by a Project Book and a Public Art Installation in Sept/Oct 2014.

The project, is led by artist Debbie Chapman, and is funded by Dublin City Council, Ballyfermot/Chapelizod Partnership and Eneclann.

We will provide you with regular updates over the summer, to track the project’s progress which we will feature in our newsletters and also on ourwebsite blog.


Latest downloads available at Eneclann

We now have 11 new download releases available on our website.

 

11 new download conversions available, for as little as€8.10,including

You can view and purchase all of our 11 latest download releases over on our website

justclick hereto have a look.

 


History Ireland Magazine, “Kindred Lines”

Check out Fiona Fitzsimons’ column, Kindred Lines in the July/August 2014 edition ofHistory Ireland.

This month Fiona writes about what records survive to trace your ancestors involved in WWI

“Irish involvement in the First World War is contentious, and historians cannot agree on either the numbers of Irish engaged in the conflict, or the number of Irish war dead. Official estimates are 210,000 mobilised and 49,300 dead, but these figures are open to challenge.

 


Research Tip of the Week!

Most researchers tracing an Irish WWI ancestor will start with the Army Service Records, the largest of all the British Services.
Less than half of all service records actually survive, because of archival destruction during the London Blitz in 1940/41.

From the original 6 ½ million+ service records, only 3 million now survive.
There are however several other sources that can help you bridge this gap in the British Army Service records.

Everyone who served overseas was entitled to the British and Victory (Campaign) medals. A lesser number of people also received awards for gallantry or distinguished service.

The National Archives U.K. has over 5 million records for British Army Medal index cards 1914-1920.

The medal cards include the recipient’s name, service number, rank and unit and are available online athttp://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/records/medal-index-cards-ww1.htm

In addition to the traditional British Armed Services the medal cards include women’s services, the Indian Army, and some civilians.

By Eneclann Research Expert, Fiona Fitzsimons,

 

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Best wishes, The Eneclann Team

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Latest Eneclann Newsletter: 9th of May 2014

Eneclann Newsletter

In this issue:

Twentyx20 Lunchtime Talks.

Irish Lives Rememebred.

Irish Census Records Covering 1821-1851

UCC Summer School

New Digital Downloads at Eneclann

Military History Archive Records.

Research Tip of the Week.

 


 

 

Dear Eneclann customer,

The Return of The Twentyx20 Lunch Time Talks

This August at the National Library of Ireland, Eneclann and Ancestor Network will host a feast for family history fans! It’s the return of theTwentyx20 lunch-time talks.We have assembled a veritable smorgasbord of experts to unlock the richness of Irish family history.

Each talk is a short introduction to a key area, source or research method in Irish family history.  The Q&A session will give you direct access to the experts, to take the mystery out of family history.

Talks start after 1 p.m. every weekday in August.

Click here to see the full list of our speakers.

For more information and for event updates keep on eye on ourWebsite blog and also ourFacebook page as we will be updating these regularly with all the information you will need to know on all our wonderful speakers or you can email us atmarketing@localhost


Irish Lives remembered.

This monthsIrish Lives Remembered Online Magazine is now out! featuring a three page spread byEneclann Research Expert and Director Fiona Fitzsimons on “The Carlow origins of Carol Ann Duffy, British poet Laureate”, on pages 14&15, Also In this months issue you can read all about The National Archives of Ireland,FindmypastandFamilySearch and the release of pre 1901-Census Records, including many more wonderful articles from the world of Genealogy.


Surviving Irish Census Records Covering 1821-1851 go online for the first time.

New and online for the first time ever inFindmypast’s 100 in 100 campaign, surviving Irish census records.

Listen toEneclann Director Brian Donovan, explain the importance of these new online records, and why he is excited about their publication

Click the image below to head over to ourFacebook page and view all the images from The Launch of the Pre-1901 Online Census records in The National Archives of Ireland where Jimmy Deenihan, TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Frances McGee, Acting Director of the National Archives of Ireland and our very own Brian Donovan were all there along with many more to launch these exciting new records.


Hilary McDonagh and The Genealogy Summer School.

Ancestral Connections 2014 is an International Genealogy summer school developed by Lorna Moloney at ACE – University College Cork, it offers a programme of outstanding quality for those interested in tracing their Irish roots.

All aspects of subjects are covered by a series of presentations and ‘hands on’ workshops given by a selection of Ireland’s leading genealogical lecturers and experts,

This week we caught up with Hilary McDonagh Director ofIrish Ancestry who will be giving a number of interesting talks at the Summer school and asked him to give us a little idea of what he is all about.

Hilary McDonagh will be giving a talk on-Friday the 4th of July: 2pm-2.45pm:
Sons & Children- Genealogy of Irish Childhood.

Have a lookhereat the line up for this amazing summer school.

 


Latest Downloads available at Eneclann

We now have 14 new download releases available on our website
14 new download conversions available, for as little as €1.25, including:
  • Several Parish Register Society publications of registers from Dublin city dating from 1619 (parishes of St. Catharine, St. John, St. Marie, St. Luke, St. Werburgh and St. Nicholas Without)
  • Bram Stoker’s first book
  • Topographical books about Galway, Mayo, Roscommon, etc
  • Local and national histories of Irelan
  • Directories.
You can view and purchase all of our 14 latest download releases over on our website

justclick here to have a look and purchase.


Military History Archive Records.

In this Months edition ofHistory Ireland Magazine, Eneclann’s own Fiona Fitzsimons takes a closer look at the records of the Military History Archive. “If you have a rebel in the family, or a Volunteer ancestor active during the Irish Revolutionary period 1913-1923, this is where you look.” These archives have further information for anyone with family in the Defence Forces since the foundation of the State. “History Ireland” is in all good newsagents and selected bookshops and available to buy now.


Research Tip of the week

Let him be. He learnt the lesson of the land” – Bull McCabe.

Irish people’s obsession with land and property, so beautifully encapsulated by John B. Keane’s play The Field and latterly in the film adaptation, is well known. It’s an obsession that any family history researcher would do well to embrace.

When I first came to genealogy I knew my historical research skills would stand me in good stead, but I failed to appreciate the importance geography plays in the pursuit of ones ancestors.

If you’re unfortunate enough to have an ancestor with a name as common as Mary Murphy, it is often geography that will help you select the records relating to your ancestor and avoid the doppelgangers. The majority of the record sources used by family historians have a geographic element to them and using these, as a means of narrowing your searches, is an essential part of research.

Knowing your civil, parish and townland boundaries can make all the difference in identifying the correct record, not to mention saving time by looking in the wrong place. Don’t forget to check both sides of a boundary if you believe your ancestors lived near one. Equally don’t get too focussed on one location either, remember people did move about.

So while the Bull McCabe may have had a different lesson in mind, the lesson for this researcher was that knowing your geography can make you a better historian.

By:Stephen Peirce.


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Best wishes, The Eneclann Team

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Fiona Fitzsimons and History Ireland Magazine

History Ireland Magazine social media image

In this Months edition of,History Ireland Magazine,Eneclann Research Expert and Director Fiona Fitzsimons takes a closer look at the records of the Military History Archive. If you have a rebel in the family, or a Volunteer ancestor active during the Irish Revolutionary period 1913-1923, this is where you look.These archives have further information for anyone with family in the Defence Forces since the foundation of the State. “History Ireland” is in all good newsagents and selected bookshops and available to buy now.