Tag Archives: Genealogy

Last 5 Reviews for Twentyx20 Lunch-time talks

The following are the last 5 reviews for the Twentyx20 lunch time talks help in the National Library of Ireland for the month of August

16.Brian Donovan

Landlords & Tenants: land and estate records for Irish family history research.

IMG_8395As our scheduled speaker was unable to attend, Eneclann’s own Brian Donovan stepped back into the ring with a talk entitled “Landlords & tenants: Land and estate records for Irish Family History Research.

Brian’s paper gave an overview of the principal land and estate records available for Ireland. In the absence of census records these sources are an essential resource for Irish research. But until recently these sources were poorly understood, difficult to access and interpret. Most researchers are now familiar with Griffith’s Valuation, but still fail to get the full value of the source. Moreover a wealth of data has been recently released online which transforms access and how we can use these records, especially the Landed Estate Court Rentals 1849-85. Moreover, the administration of estates and the authority of the landlord class required more than the maintenance of rentals. It was supported by a judicial system (the magistrates courts) to sustain their position. These archives represent some of the richest resources of information for the population of Ireland in the 19th century.

Brian finished his talk by discussing how the landlord system in Ireland was systematically dismantled as a result of the Land War and through the mechanism of the Land Commission which resulted in a social revolution in Ireland, that has yet to be delivered in Britain.

 

 

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17.Ray Gillespie

Doing Local History

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It’s difficult to summarise Ray Gillespie’s talk so as to do it justice.  He drew on decades of documentary research, and gave a masterful performance that ranged across 500 years of Irish history, citing sources as diverse as the medieval annals and present-day oral traditions.

In the simplest terms, local history is about examining the story of a person in their community, in a given space and time.

Family history, like local history, is best achieved when we stop looking for individuals, and instead trace people in the context of their family and their wider community.

Ray gave two case-studies, one from the late 19th Century in Donegal, the second from the second quarter of the 1500s.

The first case study is published as a book by Frank Sweeney, The Murder of Connell Boyle, county Donegal, 1898 in the Maynooth Local History Series.  In 1898 the murder of Connell Boyle shocked his community, because it appeared motiveless.  He was a widower, living alone in poverty.  He was not in dispute with his landlord, and was not involved in the land-war or in political agitation.  The community thought they knew ‘who-done-it’ but the code of silence in the face of police enquiries, meant that no-one was ever convicted of his death.

The second case study, also a murder, occurred in 1334.  Magnus Ua Duibhgennain “an eminent historian, was strangled and smothered and concealed in his own house by his own wife and by Brian [Maguire].”  Ray considered the consequences for the murderers, their families and their community.

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18. Mary McAuliffe

Finding women in the records.

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In what was one of the finest talks in the season, Mary McAuliffe showed considerable erudition and humour, when she urged the audience to ‘Cherchez les femmes’.

One of the main problems in finding women in the records, is the lack of a paper trail.  The records that survive, focus on men.  This reflects the problem of women’s’ social, political and legal status down through history.  Women are born with their father’s name, and change their names on marriage, and this can make it difficult to trace women in the historic records.

McAuliffe advised us that women are documented, but that very often it’s all about effective use of the records.  We were treated to a whistle-stop tour of many of the documents we associate with family history: census, church and civil records, land records like Griffith’s Valuation and the Tithe Applotment Books.  She then advised us how to ‘cast our net’ more widely, and find lesser known, and less frequently used sources, including diaries, letters, journals, pension applications, some Union records, amongst others.

She concluded by recommending some of the data-bases in the National Archives, in particular the sadly under-used Directory of Sources for Women’s History in Ireland; and advised us all to read the National Library’s own Research Guide for Women in Irish History, which can be found online at www.nli.ie/en/manuscript-research-guides.aspx

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19. Dan Bradley

Niall of the Nine Hostages and the genetic architecture of Irish surnames.

Paternal lineage is traced through the Y Chromosome, while maternal is traced through Mitochondrial DNA.  Surnames are also passed along the male line, so that all things being equal there should be a correlation between the Y DNA and surnames.

Prof. Bradley cited a case study that focused on the Ui Neill Clan in North West Ireland.  The case study drew on over 800 people, randomly selected, from which the following conclusions were drawn:

  •   Y Chromosome genealogy in Irish surname groups usually have a dominant founder.
  •  YDNA indicates that approximately half of all those with the Ui Neill name, or one of the associated surnames derived from the Ui Neill clan group (O’Donnell, Bradley, etc.), are descended from the founder.
  • In Ireland, even common surnames display a foundation pattern, unlike in Britain.
  • Genetic diversity in Irish subjects, indicates that surnames probably originated earlier in Ireland, than in England.

Q.E.D. Ancient genealogy linkages in Ireland are often true.

In the Q&A session that followed, the Prof. revealed that he’s currently working on ancient DNA.  Early indications point to some exciting results!

Those of you interested in ‘this kind of thang’ will be pleased to hear, that Prof. Dan Bradley has already agreed to return in 2015 to talk about his new research findings.

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20. Damien Shiels

Uncovering the Irish of the American Civil War.

America is currently commemorating the 150th Anniversary of civil war (1861-1865).  One of the neglected stories in our history, is Irish participation in this conflict.  Official neglect is all the more surprising, considering how Ireland has courted the American connexion.

Between 1861 and 1865 approximately 200,000 Irish fought in the American Civil War: an estimated 180,000 in the Union army; and ca. 20,000 in the Confederate army.

An estimated 20% or 23,600 of the Union Navy were Irish-born.  We don’t yet have comparable figures for the smaller Confederate Navy.

The total number of the Irish that died in this conflict has been estimated at 30,000.

The Irish that fought in the American civil war, were predominantly the ‘Famine Irish’.

In a commanding performance Damian Shiels introduced us to the main sources online to trace the forgotten history of these Irish soldiers.

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This brought to a close the Twentyx20 talks in 2014.

We achieved record audiences this year, consistently higher than in any of the previous years.  A huge thank you to our speakers for their contribution, and also to the audience, many of whom were regulars throughout the month.

“Family history is popular history, but it’s also a discipline that cuts across many branches of learning.  In planning these talks, we wanted to show this multi-faceted aspect of our subject, which draws on archaeology and archives, genealogy and historical geography, genetics, history and professional researchers, writers and bloggers.

Of course the Twentyx20 talks are not simply about family history.  The talks were conceived with the idea that we might bring in a new audience, and persuade them of the enjoyment and simple pleasures that can be found in research.

In 2014 our invited speakers included established names like Patrick Comerford, Else Churchill, Brian Donovan, Jacinta Prunty and Ray Gillespie.  Family history is also a vibrant discipline, and we wanted to showcase emerging new talent like Lorna Moloney, Rhona Murray, Damian Shiels and John Tierney.

Finally, the Twentyx20 talks are a paen to the National Library of Ireland and its’ wonderful staff.  Since 2008 the National Library of Ireland has grown attendance by 85%, despite budgetary cuts of 40% in the same time-frame.  That the Library has continued to draw in a new audience, is a tribute to the dedication and commitment of the public servants that work there.  The Library provides an essential creative space in Dublin City to research, write, think and create plans.”

Cheers,

Fiona

Latest Eneclann Newsletter

Eneclann News- October 10th 2014

In this week’s newsletter we offer you more from Eneclann and what’s going on in the world of Irish family history. Recent events include radio interviews with Fiona Fitzsimons, and an interview with Paul Manzor, Eneclann’s publications manager on the subject of Digitisation. We look forward to the next Expert Workshop in Family History at the National Library (11 Oct.); and to the Back to our past show in the RDS (17, 18, 19 Oct.) Our research tip this week is by acclaimed genealogist Helen Moss

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The History Show

Last Sunday (5th Oct.) Fiona Fitzsimons was a guest on Myles Dungan’sHistory Show on RTE1. The topic of discussion was on the new release of the Pensions Applications forms for service during the Irish Revolutionary Period 1913-23. “Pension applications usually contain the greatest amount of genealogical information, of all military records.This is because pensions can be claimed by family dependents – widows, aged parents, minor children, and sometimes also dependent siblings” Fiona also emphasised the improved search function of the Pensions Data base, that hugely increases the user’s ability to drill down into the records. In particular, the drop-down menus that allow to search by organisation, eg: Cumann na mBan, Connaught Rangers, etc.Listen here to the interview as Fiona encourages a good browse across the records.

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Back to our past 2014

Back to our past is right around the corner, and of course Eneclann will be exhibiting – at stand 30, 30a, 31 and 31a. Come and meet our team of expert researchers, ready to help you with your family history research. Eneclann’s own Brian Donovan and Fiona Fitzsimons will give talks on Friday and Saturday.  On Sunday our guest speaker will be internationally renowned genealogist, Eileen O’Duill.  We will be joined at our stand by Mary Choppa fromTIARA (The Irish Ancestral Research Association), to provide an ‘American perspective’ on Irish immigrants to the U.S.Click here for more information.

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Digitisation and Publications at Eneclann

Since 1998 Eneclann has been at the forefront of digital publishing for Irish genealogy and history.  We started with CD-ROMs, before moving to online delivery, and more recently digital downloads.  Now Eneclann’s Publishing Manager, Paul Manzor, has written an  article to give you a better understanding ofwhere we’re at with Digitisation and publications.

newsletter bar      Expert Workshops

The Expert Workshops in Irish Family History series resumed in September with a double bill on emigration from the Poor Law Unions, by Kay Caball in Trinity College, and Dr. Gerard Moran in the National Library. In October, we continue this Saturday (11 Oct.) with Claire Bradley speaking on ‘Crowd-sourcing’ in the National Library.Read all about the it here.

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Great Great Great Family Tree’s

Tony Hennessy has launched his new websiteGreat Great Great Family Treesand you can check it out on hisfacebook page. If you are looking to get your family tree created and personalised, but don’t know where to start then this is the place for you.

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The Genealogy Radio Show

Our friend and colleague Lorna Moloney has a new radio show“The Genealogy Radio Show” on Community Radio Corca Baisciinn.Each week she looks at a different aspect of Irish family history live.  Listen to a podcast of her recent interview withEneclann’s Fiona Fitzsimons speaking on tracing records of children: ‘Painless facts: do they exist in genealogy?  Find thefull interview here.

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Research tip of the week

Each newsletter we offer you a research tip written by one of our expert researcher’s, in the hope that we can somehow help you along your genealogy path. This week Helen Moss has written a research tip on “researching mid-19th century marriage registers.”

You can read thefull research tip here

research tip of the week

 

Back To Our Past 2014

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Brian Boru, Oliver Cromwell and Napoleon Bonaparte all feature in the titles of the Presentations at the 5th annual Back To Our Past [BTOP] event at the RDS, Dublin, on the weekend of 17-19 October 2014.  As usual, over the three days of BTOP there will be two concurrent strands of free talks on a range of Irish heritage topics.  Oral tradition, graveyards, school records and newspapers feature as sources, while there are several lectures on emigration. Online research, London record repositories and tracing ancestors in British India all feature.

Among the speakers will be familiar faces such as Else Churchill, Brian Donovan, Fiona Fitzsimons, and John Grenham.  Also lecturing at BTOP for the first time are the Detroit genealogist Richard M. Doherty, a frequent visitor to Kerry and Patrick Fitzgerald of the Mellon Centre for Migration Studies.  In addition there will be the usual presentations on behalf of the genealogical companies Ancestry.com, Eneclann and Findmypast.

The Presentations are organised by the Association of Professional Genealogists in Ireland [APGI] on behalf of BTOP.

The Presentations provide a focus for BTOP, but it is a heritage experience with much more happening.  Exhibitors representing Irish and overseas genealogical societies, data providers, record repositories, heritage magazines and heritage sites will be on hand to give advice and engage with individual enquirers. This is a chance for family, military and local history buffs to put questions to the likes of the General Register Office of Northern Ireland, the National Archives, Eneclann, FamilyTreeDNA, Findmypast, TIARA, Ancestry and Irish Roots Magazine, or to join a society.  As usual, Eric Knowles of BBC’s Antiques Roadshow will be on hand to advise on heirlooms, while visitors may wander through the Over 50s Show in the main RDS Hall and into the neighbouring Coin & Stamp Fair.

BTOP also contains a ‘show within a show’ run by the International Society of Genetic Genealogists [ISOGG] and sponsored by FamilyTreeDNA.  It consists of a stream of lectures on genetic genealogy running throughout the weekend.

Back To Our Past runs from 11 am until 7pm daily.  Tickets are €10 at the door, but can you can get a €3 reduction by booking online at <www.backtoourpast.com>.  where full details of the presentation programme are posted.

 

ENECLANN LOGO

Eneclann will be exhibiting at stand 30, 30a, 31 and 31a, with a team of our expert researchers ready to help you with all your family history research, Eneclann will also be giving three talks throughout the weekend, you can also sign up to our newsletter over the weekend and be in with a chance of winning some very exciting stuff (more details to come)

We will be joined at our stand with our lovely friendsTIARA (The Irish Ancestral Research Association) who will be more than happy to help you with all you need to know about your American roots.

Have a look at the Eneclann Timetable for talks at Back to our Past 2014.

Don’t forget to also pop over to our partners at findmypast who will be there all weekend to help you with your family history research needs.

Back To Our Past runs from 11 am until 7pm daily.  Tickets are €10 at the door, but can you can get a €3 reduction by booking online at <www.backtoourpast.com>.

See you there!

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Back to our Past 2014

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Back to our past 2014 is here again, 17th, 18th and 19th October 2014 Industries Hall, RDS Dublin, Ireland

Friday: 11am – 7pm

Sat & Sun: 11am – 7pm

Eneclann will be exhibiting at stand 30, 30a, 31 and 31a, with a team of our expert researchers ready to help you with all your family history research, Eneclann will also be giving three talks throughout the weekend,

Eneclann Timetable for talks at Back to our Past 2014.

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  For further details:  phone 00 353 1 496 9028,

or go towww.backtoourpast.com

see you there :)

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MR TUKE’S FUND

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Tuke Conference Booking Form – final-1

 

Expert Workshops for Continuous Professional Development, have resumed again.

Organised by Eneclann’s Fiona Fitzsimons and Ancestor Newtwork‘s Maeve Mullins.

The Expert Workshop series resumed this week, with a double-bill from our own Kay Caball, and guest speaker Dr. Gerard Moran.

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Kay Caball led a workshop on  “Researching the Kerry Girls: Emigration and the Earl Grey Scheme.”
The workshop was held in the Davis Theatre, Trinity College Dublin at 3pm on 11th September.

 

 

The second Expert Workshop for CPD, will take place at 2pm today, Saturday 13th September in the National Library of Ireland, Kildare Street.

Dr. Gerard Moran will give a workshop on “Emigration from the Workhouses and family history.”

 

We have a first rate line-up for the Expert Workshops this Autumn.
Keep an eye on our newsletter for all announcements.
The workshops are free ticketed events.

To apply for a ticket to the particular workshop you’re interested in attending, write to workshop@eneclann.ie

 

jack and jill foundation

As part of our monthly Continuous Professional Development in Irish Family History workshops we will have a little box set up for anyone who would like to donate what they can to such a worthy cause, all proceeds will go to the charity and hopefully make a difference to someone.

Free Family History Research Day

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Eneclann andFindmypast celebrated National Heritage Week by holding a “Free Family History For Beginners Day” at Dublin City Library and Archive on the 26th of August, the turnout from the general public on the day was great, and it was wonderful to see so many new faces all eagerly awaiting some expert advice on how to get started on their family history research. Our expert reseacrhers managed to help so many attendees on the day, have a look at some images from the day below.

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Pictured: Eneclann director, Brian Donovan helping attendees to trace their family history.

 

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The team at Eneclann and findmypast met with the general public throughout the day to help them search for information and give them uselful tip’s on how to get started on their family history reseach.

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Eneclann Research expert Stephen Peirce, pictured helping out a lady on her mission to research her family history.

 

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Here we see Eneclann research expert Carmel Gilbride as she works her research magic on these two attendees.

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Free geneaolgy advisory service 2014

GAS TALKS 2014

Dublin can be Heaven

Throughout the year, the National Library of Ireland (NLI) offers a genealogical advisory service through its dedicated staff, Francis Carroll and Christina McDonnell.  To cope with summer’s  influx of extra visitors this service is augmented during these busy  months.  Once again this year, Eneclann and Ancestor Network were successful in winning the tender for this service.

Drawing on personnel from both Eneclann and Ancestor Network, our team worked Monday through Saturday at the Library, meeting all comers. We have striven to enhance the welcoming space offered to family historians by the National Library of Ireland. With an increase of over 10% in visitor numbers to Ireland in 2014, it has been a busy summer for all. My own experience in the Library began five years ago and in this time I have observed a change in the demand for this service. With so many records now digitised, often times it has been a matter of guiding visitors through the myriad of records now online.

We have introduced overseas visitors to websites they may not yet have encountered, such as irishgenealogy.ie,www.findmypast, and dublinheritage.ie . For many this was just the impetus they needed to continue their searching long after their departure from our shores.  Frequently, visitors arrive at the Library on the last day of their holiday and are very pleased to know they can continue their searches online. What has not changed over the last five years is the great hunger that exists amongst people to trace their family. The interest in this area continues to grow and we are delighted play our part in this developing field. One of the pleasures of working in the Library is meeting generations of the one family who, drawing on combined skills in the area of oral history with the application of computer know-how, can really make progress in tracing their family history.

It is always a delight to be on hand when a discovery is made and to reconnect people with earlier generations of their family. In addition to our participation in the NLI’s Genealogical Advisory Service, this year has seen the runaway success of the Twentyx20 lunchtime talks during the month of August.  The brainchild of Eneclann’s Research Direct Fiona Fitzsimons, this series of free talks drew on a wide range of speakers. Visitors to the Library have been treated to a cornucopia of experts.

Family history is a very broad church and the range of speakers assembled by Fiona Fitzsimons is testament to this. Throughout all this activity our team has been graciously hosted and welcomed by the NLI’s staff in the handsome setting of the National Library. For this Dubliner, entering the portals of our National Library, to work as part of this team, I know that Dublin can, indeed, be heaven

By, Eneclann research expert,

Carmel Gilbride.

1ee73ce9 b1f4 4ff1 8548 bbcc50baea26 Latest Eneclann Newsletter. 1/9/2014

We hope you are enjoying the Free Genealogy Service inThe National Library of IrelandthatEneclannandAncestor Network continue to provide each day this Summer, With such a wide and Comprehensive range of expertise from our experts all summer we aim to help anyone looking for help and advice in tracing their family history.

The service is free to all visitors of the Library.

9.30 a.m. to 4.45 p.m. Monday to Friday,

9.30 a.m. to 12.45 on Saturdays.

 

National Heritage Week 2014

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Join Eneclann and findmypast this National Heritage week for some free family history advice on the 26th of August.

We will be entertaining you on the day, with

Expert help and advice from our team of genealogists here at Eneclann.
Demonstrations on how to access Findmypast’s millions of family history records.
Hourly lectures on family history topics.

You can also attend talks every hour during the day from the experts about all things family history related and let them help you build your family tree.

Have a look at the lectures that will take place throughout the day

TimeTopicLecturer
12pmWhere to start when building your family treeFiona Fitzsimons,
Eneclann
1pmCensus, land and birth marriage and death records – the building blocks of Irish family historyBrian Donovan, Eneclann
2pmAdd some colour to your family tree with military, crime and newspaper recordsAoife O’Connor, findmypast
3pmTracing your ancestors who moved abroadCliona Weldon, findmypast

Starting at 11am and ending at 4pm on Tuesday 26th August in Dublin City Library and Archives, Pearse Street, Dublin 2.

This day is the perfect opportunity for all of you who want to get going on building your family tree but just don’t know where to start. We cant wait to share our expert advice to you all and get you started.

And as an extra added bonus on the day findmypast will also have some exclusive event offers for all you newcomers to the world of family history!

see you there ;)

Free Lunch-time talks kick off at the National Library of Ireland

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The Twentyx20 lunch times talks kick off tomorrow, with our very first expert speaker Brian Donovan, The talk will take place at 1.05pm in the National Library of Ireland and is free to anyone who would like to attend, Brian’s talk will be on “Delivering the digital revolution in Irish Family History”

We hope to see you there. :)

http://www.eneclann.ie/2014/05/the-return-of-the-twentyx20-lunch-time-talks/

Latest Eneclann Newsletter 25th July 2014

Eneclann Newsletter
In this issue:

Celtic Connections Conference 2014.

The Genealogy event Limerick.

Lunch time talks in the National Library.

Free Genealogy advisory service 2014.

Research Tip of  the week.

Carmel Gilbride unlocks the past for passengers


 

 

The Latest Eneclann Newsletter………

The Celtic Connections Conference 2014

 

Eneclann’s very own Brian Donovan heads state side for the Celtic Connections conference this August!

This August the 15th and 16th our very own expert Brian Donovan will be heading to the Celtic Connections Conference in Waltham, Massachusetts to join all the leading experts in genealogy from near and far, Brian will be speaking on the following topics:

Usingfindmypast.com to Trace your Irish Family History.

Murderer, rebels and Drunkards: Your Irish ancestors and the Law.

This two day event will include 20+ lecturers and 26 presentations by well-known experts in their respective fields.

such as:
John Grenham
Eileen Ó Dúill
Sean Ó Dúill
Kyle Betit
 Dwight Radford
Donna Moughty
Bill Budde
and many more!

Go towww.celtic-connections.org now for all you need to know on this great event.


The Genealogy Event Limerick

The countdown is on to The Genealogy Event in Limerick with only 5 weeks to go, If you are planning a trip to Ireland or a trip to Limerick then The Genealogy Event is one not to be missed, It will take place on the 22nd and 23rd of August, The two day event will bring you presentations by the experts in genealogy along with other social events that will help attendees meet one another in relaxed settings.

 Dont forget to look out for our very own Eneclann duo, Fiona Fitzsimons and Brian Donovan who will also be there to give their expert advise ;)

Phone: +353 61 331549

Email:info@bbnygroup.com

Web:www.thegenealogyevent.com

Tickets may be purchased online via thebuy tickets here button or

contacting Event Partner, the Irish Ancestry Research Centre on +353 61 207 114

 


Lunch Time talks in the National Library

This August at theNational Library of Ireland,Eneclann andAncestor Network will host a feast for family history fans! It’s the return of the Twentyx20 lunch-time talks.Each talk is a short introduction to a key area, source or research method in Irish family history. The Q&A session will give you direct access to the experts.


Free Genealogy advisory service in the National Library of Ireland 2014

The joint consortium ofEneclannandAncestorNetworkare providing a wide and comprehensive range of expertise in The National Library of Ireland all summer to anyone looking for help and advice in tracing their family history,

The service is free to all visitors to the Library.

9.30 a.m. to 4.45 p.m. Monday to Friday,

9.30 a.m. to 12.45 on Saturday.

See you there!


Eneclann helps Unlock the Past for Cruise ship Passengers

This morning in theNational Library of Ireland,
Eneclann research expert Carmel Gilbride, gave a talk on migration to Australia to the cruise ship passengers ofUnlock the Past cruises, Carmel also shared her expert advise and answered questions and queries that the Australian passengers had regarding their Irish Family history, the cruise ship passengers used the library to seek out all the information they wanted through out the morning and with the help of Carmel they hopefully unravelled some mysteries.


Research Tip of the week

It may be that we think we have mined everything we can about our families from the 1901 and 1911 Census. But a few recent searches have had me re evaluate this idea.

It can be so difficult to select the correct family when the name is one that proliferates. It seems, at the outset to be impossible.
But along the way, we may establish a county of birth and that can narrow down our search.

Then we may learn an occupation and this can be really key in selecting the correct record.  But, even at that point, – given the proliferation of labourers in Ireland’s economy of the opening decades of the 20th century – we can be still be faced with a choice.Great care is needed at this point to ensure we do not dismiss records from our search.

We might expect to find, the pairing of say a husband and wife, the parents of children we have found. But, we should be mindful of the fact that one or other parent may have died and remarried. Pay particular attention, in the 1911 Census, to the number of years married.

If the wife indicates that she has been married for ten years, yet there are persons listed as children as the head of household who are older than ten, then you have to dig deeper.

The children {of whatever age} are correctly enumerated as the offspring of the head of household. But these children are not necessarily the children
of his wife.
If you are very fortunate, the second marriage of this head of household may be civilly registered, where his first marriage was not. In this way, you may be able to bring a family back, through following the clues in the census, to an earlier generation.

Carmel Gilbride,
Research Expert,

 

 


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Best wishes, The Eneclann Team

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