Tag Archives: Genealogy

Podcasts: The house on Bunion Hill: an Irish census project

Ray Gillespie

The house on Bunion Hill: an Irish census project

How do you write local history?  In the past people worked within a world of family and community. For that reason, genealogy is a very important resource for the local historian but is often forgotten about, as local historians tend to concentrate on place rather than people.

The Prof. looked at one household in north Armagh in the 1901 census to see what the history of one family might tell us about the world in which they lived.

He concluded that genealogists need to become more historically minded, and historians need to pay more attention to genealogy.

Enjoy :)

 Listen to all the podcasts from our expert talks in the National Library of Ireland here

News Digest

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  • Catholic parish registers in Ireland from 1740′s on now published online:

http://www.irishcentral.com/roots/genealogy/Genealogical-treasure-trove-as-Catholic-parish-register-published-online.html

  • Chicago May: The Irish queen of crooks:

http://www.irishcentral.com/roots/Chicago-May-The-Irish-queen-of-crooks.html

  • Celebration of Irish who built the world’s major cities comes to New York and Chicago (VIDEO):

http://www.irishcentral.com/culture/community/Celebration-of-Irish-who-built-the-worlds-major-cities-comes-to-New-York-and-Chicago-VIDEO.html

  • Rare 1880s photo captures Achill women breaking stones:

http://www.irishtimes.com/culture/heritage/rare-1880s-photo-captures-achill-women-breaking-stones-1.2273031

  • A century of Irish history goes online in posters, pamphlets and diaries:

http://www.irishcentral.com/roots/history/A-century-of-Irish-history-goes-online-in-posters-pamphlets-and-diaries-PHOTOS.html

  • Release of listing of 2,558 veterans of Easter Week 1916 with recognised military service. The list of names and addresses can be downloaded:

http://www.militaryarchives.ie/collections/online-collections/military-service-pensions-collection/news-and-updates/single-view/article/release-of-listing-of-2558-veterans-of-easter-week-1916-with-recognised-military-service?cHash=6d7ae63c1ea12f65a8f5b9422a246d03

  • The best medieval statue in Ireland is 8ft tall and in a ruined church in Kilkenny:

http://www.thejournal.ie/heritage-ireland-kilkenny-2153658-Jun2015/?utm_source=shortlink

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  • Irish civil records to be published online, on the Irish Genealogy website.

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/politics/genealogy-website-restores-access-to-records-1.2167965

  • Plans are afoot to create a new Irish Diaspora Centre in Dublin, as a visitor attraction

http://www.irishtimes.com/business/companies/former-coca-cola-chief-in-dublin-to-oversee-plans-for-epic-ireland-at-chq-1.2155120

  • An Irish American’s epic fight to ‘get even’ with Alzheimer’s

http://www.irishcentral.com/news/An-Irish-Americans-epic-fight-to-get-even-with-Alzheimers.html

  • Brian Mitchell writes about a branch of his family tree, and the final voyage of the Lusitania, in the Londonderry Sentinel.

On 7th May 1915  RMS Lusitania was torpedoed by a German U-Boat, 11 miles off Cobh and inside the German-declared ‘zone of war,’ with loss of 1,195 lives, including those of 123 American citizens.
http://www.londonderrysentinel.co.uk/news/local-news/final-voyage-of-the-ill-fated-lusitania-1-6702508

2,400 Scotch American clansmen returned to Glasgow, via Derry!

They stopped off briefly in Derry, which was then a transatlantic hub, to disembark 500 American tourists!!

Anchor Line Express Service

The Anchor Line, from 1866 right through to 1939, operated its ‘American Express Passenger Service’ from Derry to New York. Their liners called at Moville, in the deeper waters of Lough Foyle, some 18 miles downstream from Londonderry, to pick up emigrants who were ferried from Derry in paddle tenders.

In those days Derry (like Shannon and Dublin today) was the hub of a transatlantic tourist trade.

For example, on Thursday 26 July 1928, Anchor Liners Transylvania and Caledonia arrived from New York and Boston within one hour of each other in Lough Foyle, bringing 2,400 Scottish Clansmen from America, destined for Glasgow, and a further party of 500 American tourists who disembarked to begin their holiday ‘to see the scenic beauties of the Emerald Isle.’

The Anchor Line’s tender Seamore ‘left Londonderry for Moville early in the day with a large party of officials, cinema, and Pressmen to meet the liners’ and ‘welcomed the clansmen in true Scottish style to accompaniment of pipes.’ One of the returning Clansmen was a brother of Sir Harry Lauder.

British Pathé video (duration 1 minute 7 seconds, no sound), dated 30 July 1928, survives of the returning ‘Scotch American clansmen’ on board the Caledonia, berthed in Glasgow, with title ‘“To dear old Scotland with my Ain Folk!” – Rousing reception at welcome home to 2,400 Scotch American Clansmen’ at http://www.britishpathe.com/video/to-dear-old-scotland-with-my-ain-folk/query/CROWDS.

Research Tip of the Week.

Social networking and the genealogist.

“For the times they are a changing”, Bob Dylan’s immortal words can be applied to many things, not least genealogical research in the digital world. The greater availability of records online and the surge in global interest in family history over the past decade has meant that never has there been as much genealogical information available to as many people.

While the “digital revolution” dramatically altered access to records, in many ways it didn’t alter the practice of genealogy to the same degree, records were still studied and mined for information in the same way. However, one aspect of the “digital revolution” which is truly changing the practice of genealogical research, is social networking.

Where in the past the genealogical researcher may have ploughed a lonely furrow, with the advent of social networking, new opportunities to engage with others ploughing similar furrows have been created. Blogs, family trees, message boards, etc. all offer new possibilities in terms of sharing information and advice.

Below are some tips on how to take your first steps in genealogical social networking.

Age is but a number - Many think of social networking as the preserve of the youth, but ‘silver surfers’ are one of the major growth groups in the sector. You’ll be amazed by how many of your contemporaries are already networking.

Do your research – As with anything to do with genealogy, it’s worth putting research in. Don’t simply join the largest networks or those marketed most actively at you. Seek out the groups and sites most relevant to your line of research. This can be done by focusing on a geographic location or family name.

Connect, like, follow - When you’ve identified the groups, organisations and sites that are relevant to your research, connect with them through your preferred medium (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Google+, newsletter, etc). You’d be amazed how many are running events that could be of use to your research. One such example is Eneclann and FindMyPast’s “Ask the experts” Facebook Q&A events which are held during the year (Next event: Friday 20th February on Irish central’s Facebook page).

Be active not passive – When you find information of use in discussion groups or forums don’t just read it and move on, be brave, post a comment or if you don’t find what you’re looking for, start a discussion topic, you never know who might reply!

The genealogical landscape is no longer shaped by long straight furrows, but rather a criss-cross patchwork of intersecting research. Get out there and make some connections, you never know where it might lead, or who it might lead to.

 By Stephen Peirce

Expert Researcher at Eneclann.

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The Role of Romance in Family History

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Births and marriages are the stock in trade of genealogists. We spend our days in dusty archives, extracting information from these documents, seeking to learn more about our ancestors. On this Valentines weekend, it seems like a good time to press the pause button, and reflect on the human stories behind the documents.

In times past marriage was the cornerstone of family life. We can only imagine how much hope was invested in these marriages. With our historian’s hat, we know that pairings didn’t always begin in romance. Marriages of the wealthier in Irish society were often strategic alliances. For a strong farmer, his daughter’s choice of husband was a matter of careful vetting. A family’s land based wealth could not pass to an incapable, unreliable son-in-law.

By contrast, the poor had greater opportunity to marry for love. The more cynical amongst us might say these couples spent a lifetime repenting at their leisure.

For the team here at Eneclann, family and its history is our daily work. In some instances we certainly see the absence of romantic love. We uncover difficult stories of couples creating an unhappy family life. For some of the clients we work with, excavating family history is a sad affair, and certainly not the narrative of wine and roses.

Can we ever tell if our ancestor’s marriages were a love match? How can we get beyond the documents and ‘read ‘the story as correctly as we can. On this Valentine’s weekend, I like to remember what is known about my grandparent’s short marriage. My father’s mother – Margaret – was an ‘absent’ presence in our family history. Within weeks of giving birth to my father, Margaret died. Little concrete was known about her, and in fact for many years my family research project was labelled “Margaret Lost.” It seemed important to document anything I could find about her.

The search for my grandparent’s marriage certificate was one of my first forays to the General Register Office. I was surprised to learn from the marriage certificate that, although from the same village, they had not married in their parish church. It seems Margaret was in service and married in the church near her workplace. Wanting to make sure I had the correct record, I showed my father his parents’ marriage-certificate. To my surprise, he was overcome with emotion.

The church where my grandparents married, was, it seems, the same church that my grandfather brought his own son to, each and every Sunday of my father‘s childhood. As a young child, my father could not understand why his father chose to worship in this church some miles distant from their village home. Learning that his father had married in this church made a great deal of sense to my father. We realized that each Sunday, my grandfather was, in fact, making a pilgrimage back to church where he had married Margaret. Together with the fact that he never remarried makes me think that grandfather and Margaret’s union was indeed a love match. Oh, and the fact that Margaret did not bring a big farm to the family!

From our vantage point today, we hope that our ancestors were love matches. However, we know that in the past many marriages were based on the need for security and companionship. It’s probably true to say that many of our ancestors entered into marriage, hoping to build love on these foundations.

By Eneclann Research Expert,

Carmel Gilbride.carmel-gilbride

31st of January 2014,Latest Eneclann Newsletter

In the latest edition of Eneclann’s newsletter we fill you in on some recent events in Irish genealogy. The new series of Expert Workshops for Continuous Professional Development returns in 2015; Learn the truth behind George Clooney’s Irish Roots as told by Eneclann’s own Fiona Fitzsimons interviewed recently on Midlands Radio ; We share a lovely testimonial from Ray Judge who commissioned our expert researchers to work their magic on his family history; Listen to the latest podcast from Lorna Moloney’s Genealogy Radio Show; and of course our readers’ “favourite bit” – the Research tip of the week; Enjoy :)

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The Expert Workshops Return

The Expert Workshops for CPD return in 2015. This year, Fiona Fitzsimons of Eneclann is joined by John Hamrock of Ancestor Network, to develop a new and diverse range of workshops for professional family historians and independent scholars. In February, our first speaker is,Catriona Crowe speaking on the National Archive’s publication plans in 2015,Our second workshop takes place on Valentine’s Day.  Mary Chaill will give a special presentation on IT for professional genealogists in the National Library of Ireland. Read all you need to know about these talks here.

 

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RootsTech 2015

There’s less than 2 weeks to,RootsTech 2015 conference in Salt Lake City, Utah, February 12-14, 2015. The Eneclann contingent are looking forward to Roots Tech.  Come and meet Brian Donovan, Paul Manzor and Laura Carroll, at Stand 1342.  And ask them about some of,the exciting new projects we’re working onnewsletter bar

George Clooney hits the headlines again!

Will Faulkner recently interviewed Fiona Fitzsimons on,Midlands103′sToday Show and asked her some hard questions about George Clooney’s Irish ancestry.
Listen to what Fiona had to say about the evidence, and the story it tells us. If you’re partial to Mr. Clooney, read all about his Irish Family History,here.newsletter bar

              Testimonials

We have so many wonderful clients here at,Eneclann.  Good feedback from you, really makes our day, and makes the researchers’ job all the more worthwhile.  Here’s a testimonial email we received from a,recent client, If you would like to read some amazing stories from previous clients of ours you can view them all on our,website.newsletter bar

The Genealogy Radio Show

Tune in to the most recent episode’s of Lorna Moloney’s,Genealogy Radio Show”, broadcast on Community Radio Corca Baiscinn,Listen to  Episode 1- Series 2 Trade Directories,‘Your Ancestors did What? and  Episode 2, Series 2,Marriage and Burial customs, Folklore in practice – Sean O’Duillnewsletter bar

Research Tip of the week

“The research tip this week is by Helen Moss, Eneclann’s senior researcher.
Helen is one of the most able family-history researchers in Ireland, and heads up the Eneclann research team, read her,Tip of the week here.newsletter bar

Latest Eneclann Newsletter December 13th

In this week’s newsletter we offer you more from Eneclann, and all that is going on in the world of Irish Family History this festive season. We include a little reminder about the Eneclann EII (Employment and Investment Incentive) Scheme 2014; Eneclann’s own Fiona Fitzsimons recently made the September edition of the APG Quarterly; we bring you up to speed with the latest podcast from Lorna Moloney’s Genealogy radio-show; and our research team have a Research Tip of the Week. Plus there’s so much more to enjoy :)

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Christmas Gift Certificatesgold

Are you still trying to figure out what to get that person who has everything this Christmas? A family history gift-certificate is a personal and memorable present for that special someone. It is unique to the person you give it to and their family. This year, give your loved one the gift of working with the experts who discovered Obama and Tom Cruise’s Irish family history, Click on the image to purchase yours today.

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APG Quarterly

Eneclann’s own Fiona Fitzsimons made the September edition of the APG Quarterly – “TheProfessional’s Voice.”The APG Quarterly is a journal for those interested in professionalism. It’s one of the many benefits you receive on joining the Association of Professional Genealogists. Click on the image to learn more. newsletter bar Eneclann Winter Sale.WINTER SALE IMAGE

On December 26th,Just when you think you have received all your Christmas presents, Eneclann will be offering you the best one yet, In the form of our BIG WINTER SALE! and the best part is you don’t even have to leave your couch to receive it, because we all know how hard that is after a day of indulging ;)   So don’t forget to save the date and get ready for 50% OFF all publications, More info to come nearer the sale. newsletter bar

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A gentle reminder about this year’s Employment and Investment Incentive Scheme (EII). The Employment and Investment Incentive Scheme (EII) is one of the only remaining ways in which Irish investors can reduce their 2014 tax liability. Eneclann EII is very attractive for investors, as it focuses on what has been recognised as a key component of Ireland’s economic recovery – our heritage,View here,for all you need to knownewsletter bar

Add Virtual PMC to Your Holiday Wish List

Refresh your professional skills with the Association of Professional Genealogists (APG) Professional Management Conference, this January 2015. With individual sessions beginning at just $20, a special $45 DNA bundle, or access to the full virtual conference for $145, Virtual PMC is a gift that fits every budget. Let your friends and family know which classes you want to attend,read more here.

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Give History Ireland as a Gift

Are you a little lost on what gift to get that History lover in your life? How about a subscription to History Ireland, Ireland’s best History Magazine.Remember someone special and give 12 months of fascinating, lively and compelling discussion, reflection and insight into matters of our past that remain significant for today.Check out the,full details here.newsletter bar

final fairy Image Irish Fairies seek new homes for Christmas

We still have some of our ‘little folk’ looking for new homes this Christmas, The parents of St.Laurence’s National School in Chapelizod, want to find homes for the ‘Sidhe na Nollaig’ – Christmas Fairies. Help an Irish fairy find a new home this Christmas! All proceeds go to St. Laurence’s National School.Click here to purchase. newsletter bar

Findmypast Christmas Countdown is live!

fmp Findmypast are delighted to announce the launch of their first ever Christmas Countdown! They have lined up a host of festive treats, from history quizzes and prize draws to guest columns, historical recipes, and expert family history tips. Click on the image to check it out. newsletter bar g radio show

Genealogy Radio Show:episode 14

You could light the Christmas lights along Grafton Street with the energy and verve of our good friend and colleague Lorna Moloney! Tune in to the most recent episode of “The Genealogy Radio Show”, broadcast on Community Radio Corca Baiscinn,Listen here to Episode 14,WW1 soldiers with Marian Furlong and Ann Marie Coghlan.newsletter bar last delivery dates christmas 2014

Christmas Delivery Dates

Don’t leave it too late! Have you been meaning to purchase some online publications with Eneclann before Christmas, to keep you entertained over the holidays? Perhaps you intended to buy a loved one a consultation with an Eneclann expert? Click on the image to find out more on the last delivery dates. newsletter bar research tip of the week

Research Tip of the week

Each newsletter we offer you a research tip written by one of our expert researcher’s, in the hope that we can help you along your genealogy path. This week Stephen Peirce has written a research tip on Researching Families,which you can view herenewsletter divider on blog

British Institute.

Eneclann’s Fiona Fitzsimons will be teaching at the 15th annual British Institute in Salt Lake City in Sept 2015. Fiona will be accompanied by some of the best known genealogists in the discipline, including Else Churchill and Bruce Durie. Have a look at the details of the event in full here.

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Latest Eneclann Newsletter: 15th/11/2014

In this week’s newsletter we offer you more from Eneclann, and all that is going on in the world of Irish Family history. We include Eneclann’s story of Princess Charlene of Monaco’s Irish Family History, as featured in the latest Irish Lives Remembered Genealogy Magazine. This week we conclude the expert workshops for CPD for 2014 with a focus on church of Ireland records. Lorna Maloney Genealogy Radio show is now available on podcast, and we have that very popular research tip of the week, contributed by Carmel Gilbride. Enjoy

newsletter divider on blogChapelizod Dereliction Exhibition.

On Thursday 6th of November The Chapelizod Derieliction exhibition was officially opened by Minister Simon Harris. The exhibition now runs from 10am-5pm,Thur-Sun until 23rd November 2014. It is the culmination of a nine-month community arts project led by Irish artist Debbie Chapman. The project was funded by Dublin City Council, the Ballyfermot/Chapelizod Partnership and supporting historical research was provided by Eneclann, You can find all the details on this amazing exhibition here.

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The Expert Workshops in Irish Family History series conclude this November on Saturday 15th at 2pm with Derek Neilson on a workshop entitled:“Church of Ireland records – extent, quirks and pitfalls”’ Read the full details here.

 

 

 

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Irish Lives Remembered

The latest version of Irish Lives Remembered Genealogy Magazine is now out, and this month features the work of Eneclann’s own Fiona Fitzsimons on Princess Charlene of Monaco’s Irish Family History. This is the first part of a 3 part story, go to page 8 to read this wonderful story.

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Princess Charlene’s Irish Roots

The newsletter of the Certificate of Irish Heritage also focuses on Princess Charlene’s Irish Roots, to go behind the scenes in the palace in Monaco read the full article here.

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Genealogy Radio Show: episode 11

 

Our friend and colleague Lorna Moloney has really settled into her stride on “The Genealogy Radio Show”, broadcast  on Community Radio Corca Baiscinn. Listen to episode 11 with Criostoir MacCarthaig, Senior Archivist UCD on ‘Digitisng the 1937 [folklore] school scheme’, available here.

 

 

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The Carmichaol Centre Talk

On Saturday 22nd November at 4.00pm Stoneybatter & Smithfield People’s History Project are hosting a public talk that will take place  in the Carmichael Centre, North Brunswick Street (beside the old Richmond Hospital). Read all the details here

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Research Tip of the week

Each newsletter we offer you a research tip written by one of our expert researcher’s, in the hope that we can help you along your genealogy path.This week Eneclann’s Carmel Gilbride writes.Click here to view the tip.

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Latest Newsletter 5/11/2014

Eneclann News – November 5th 2014

In this week’s newsletter we offer you more from Eneclann and all that is going on in the world of Irish family history. Recent events include the October Expert Workshop for CPD,  We have the last 5 reviews from our Twentyx20 lunch-time talks in the National Library. Our research tip this week is by Fiona Fitzsimons and we share with you all the happenings including how the Back to our Past show at the RDS went . Enjoy :)

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Back To Our Past 2014

 

We had the pleasure of exhibiting at Back To our Past 2014 in the RDS recently,Eneclann would like to say a big thank you to everyone who attended the event, old customers and new. You canread all about how we got on at the event here.

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Chapelizod Dereliction Exhibition

The upcoming exhibition “Chapelizod Dereliction” is the culmination of a nine-month community arts project led by Irish artist Debbie Chapman. The project was funded by Dublin City Council, the Ballyfermot/Chapelizod Partnership and our heritage researchers here at Eneclann, You can find all the details on thisamazing exhibition here.

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LAW 2014

Irish Probate Genealogy Partners will be exhibiting at stand 6 on the 11th and 12th of November as part of Ireland and the UK’s largest legal service roadshow“LAW”, LAW Dublin will be held at the Gresham Hotel, Dublin and promises to be the largest legal exhibition and conference to be held in the Republic of Ireland.For more information in the eventclick here

 

 

 

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Expert Workshops

 

In October the Expert Workshop took place on 11th October in the National Library of Ireland.Claire Bradley spoke on the topic:Crowdsourcing your Irish ancestry, how to use social media and message boards for genealogy.Read all abouthow the workshop went here

 

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Last 5 Twentyx20 Reviews

We have the last 5 reviews of our Twentyx20 Lunch time talks at the National Library of Ireland that were held in August, We attracted a record audience throughout the month, with our most entertaining line-up yet,Read all about it here.

 

 

 

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Research Tip of the week

Each newsletter we offer you a research tip written by one of our expert researcher’s, in the hope that we can help along your genealogy path. This week Fiona Fitzsimons has written a research tip on British Armed Forces Army Records.Have a read of theresearch tip here.

 

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