Tag Archives: genealogy tip

18th of January 2015, Latest Eneclann Newsletter.

Welcome back and happy 2015. In the latest Eneclann newsletter we let you in on some exciting new events coming up this year for Eneclann. We have the latest edition of Irish Lives Remembered featuring part 2 of the story of Princess Charlene of Monaco’s Irish roots, and an intriguing royal link to QE2!  We bring you the real truth behind George Clooney’s Irish Roots, and our readers’ “favourite bit” – the Research tip of the week. We have the first news of events in 2015, where you can meet the Eneclann experts at home and abroad; And, if you still want more, we have an article on “Workhouses and Direct Provision”, published in The Journal. Enjoy :)

newsletter divider on blogThe Truth about George Clooneys Irish Roots

george clooneyEneclann feature’s in today’s,Sunday Independent with an article on Hollywood star George Clooney and his Irish Roots, The article gathers information from research discovered by Eneclann’s very own Expert researcher Fiona Fitzsimons, You can also read the full story on his Kilkenny homestead in,Irish Lives Remembered, Read all you,need to know here.

 

newsletter bar

Fiona’s trip to Saltlake City

Earlier this month Fiona visited Salt Lake City, Utah for work. She was there to attend a board meeting of the Association of Professional Genealogists (APG), and stayed on for the APG’s annual Professional Management Conference. Read how Fiona got on here.

 

newsletter bar

Teaching Irish Family History in Salt Lake City

The British Institute has invited Eneclann’s own Fiona Fitzsimons to teach the Irish Track in its’ prestigious course, next September in Salt Lake City, Utah. In the recent edition of British Connections magazine, Fiona wrote about what she hoped to impart to all those signing up to her course. “My main goal will be to help my students to “navigate” the tumult of Irish history” Read the full article .

 

newsletter bar

 

Irish Lives Remembered

The January/February edition of ,Irish Lives Remembered Genealogy e-Magazine is now out, There’s some fabulous feature articles in this latest issue, but we’re most interested in the story of Princess Charlene of Monaco’s Irish roots.  Princess Charlene has an intriguing connection to the English Queen Elizabeth II.  Go to page 26 and,read this wonderful story.

 

 

newsletter bar

 

RootsTech 2015

Eneclann are heading to,RootsTech 2015 conference, The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) will also hold its 2015 National Conference in conjunction with,RootsTech  in Salt Lake City, Utah, February 12-14, 2015,Read all about it here.

newsletter bar

Probate Genealogy.

Eneclann and,Heirsireland, Ireland’s two leading probate genealogy firms, have combined to provide a comprehensive genealogical service to the Irish legal profession. With over 60 years combined experience on legal, title and probate research, which includes: Completing research, Identifying rightful heirs, Preparing required documentation and more,Read about The Irish Probate Genealogy Partners services here.

 

 

 

newsletter barWorkhouses and Direct Provision.

Eneclann’s own Fiona Fitzsimons recently published an article in the online magazine The Journal, in which she compared the hated workhouse system in the 19th Century and the current system of Direct Provision in today’s Ireland.  The article developed out of the Expert Workshop series held last year.  Fiona drew on the research of Dr. Gerard Moran, who gave the September workshop in the National Library (2014),Read the full story here,and tell us what do you think ?

newsletter bar

 

Irish Genealogy Summer School

 

The UCC Genealogy Summer School is back in 2015.  The School will include some of the leading experts working in their field, and will include over 42 lectures, field-trips, and other optional visits,Read all about it here.

 

newsletter bar

 

The Genealogy Radio Show.

Tune in to the most recent episode of Lorna Moloney’s “The Genealogy Radio Show”, broadcast on Community Radio Corca Baiscinn. Listen here to Episode 16: ‘Nicholas Rynne – Michael McTeigue, Champion of the world from Kilnamona.

 

 

newsletter bar

 

Research Tip of the week

This week our research-tip is written by Carmel Gilbride, who ponders on the use of,‘negative findings’ in research.

newsletter divider on blog

 

 

 

Research Tip of the week.

Each newsletter we offer you a research tip written by one of our expert researcher’s, in the hope that we can somehow help along your genealogy path. This week Stephen Peirce has written a research tip on….

Researching Families.

When researching families we often use evidence from civil certificates to guide our searches. In particular townland addresses are of use to avoid doppelgangers where a name is common.

However, addresses can sometimes be more instructive on certain documents than others. For instance, a series of birth certificates for the issue of marriage can offer an indication of how long a family were resident in an area. If five children were born in the same townland over a 10 year period, it is a safe bet that the family were resident in that townland for those 10 years.

Therefore, even if you’re only interested in a direct ancestor, often obtaining birth certificates for older or young siblings can be useful if you’re experiencing difficulties in locating a family outside of the birth of an ancestor.

One to be wary of however is residence at time of marriage. Time and again we see instances where the residence recorded for individuals, particularly men, is just that, their residence when they married, rather than actually their place of origin. In particular be wary when dealing with potentially ‘nomadic’ professions, such as ancestors that may have worked as labourers on the railroad.

A good rule of thumb if you believe the recorded townland may not be the place of origin is to turn to a census (if the event is between 1880 and 1930), census substitute (if the event is before 1880) or best of all the Cancelled Books, and see if the surname is in that townland. If there’s no sign of the surname, this may be an indication that you need to broaden your search.

 

By Stephen Peirce,

Stephen 3

Research Tip of the week: 15th November 2014

Each newsletter we offer you a research tip written by one of our expert researcher’s, in the hope that we can somehow help along your genealogy path. This week Carmel Gilbride has written a research tip on.

Family History Research and what trends to be aware of

carmel gilbride

Each family is unique in its decisions and history. We see this over and over again in our work here at Eneclann. Nonetheless, as family historians we need to be mindful of the wider patterns at play.

Knowing the general trends of say, population movement, helps us deduce certain probabilities from these facts and guide us to making informed choices when selecting records online.  Working as we do in a post digitisation age, online records are selected, often without regard to the wider context.  We see a  record that matches some of our criteria and before we know it, we have ‘our ‘ ancestor, let’s just call her Mary “No Name”,  in a UK census; then back in Ireland having a child during the Great Famine;moving again to another part of the UK ; and returning to die in Ireland. In reality, it is very unlikely that this Mary “No Name” recorded in all these records is one and the same person. At all times our research needs to look for corroborative evidence from different sources while at the same time being mindful to locate our family in the wider narrative of history.

By Carmel Gilbride.

 

Research Tip of the week, 31st – October 2015.

Each newsletter we offer you a research tip written by one of our expert researcher’s, in the hope that we can somehow help along your genealogy path. This week Fiona Fitzsimons has written a research tip on British Armed Forces Army Records.

Fiona_Fitzsimons

British Armed Forces

Army records

The most complete online collection of historic British Armed Service Records from 1760 to the present is available on www.findmypast.com

Some of the most important collections relevant to Irish family history include:

  • Chelsea Pensioners British Army service records 1760-1913 (WO97)
  • Royal Hospital, Chelsea: pensioners’ discharge documents 1760-1887 (WO121)
  • Royal Hospital, Chelsea: pensioners’ discharge documents, foreign regiments 1816-1817 (WO122)
  • Royal Hospital, Chelsea: documents of soldiers awarded deferred pensions 1838-1896 (WO131)

The difference between Chelsea Pensioners and Kilmainham Pensioners, was that Kilmanham Pensioners ‘lived-in’. The Royal Hospital in Chelsea administered pensions for Irish soldiers living in their own homes in England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales. If your Irish ancestor enlisted in the British Army, but returned home to Ireland after completing his term of duty, you are likely to find him in the Chelsea Pensioners records.

Research Tip of the Week.

This week’s research tip is written by Research Expert Helen Moss

tom-cruise

We often come across people researching their ancestors who are disappointed with the lack of details in mid-19th century marriage registers.  In Roman Catholic marriage registers the name of the bride and groom, their witnesses and sometimes a townland were the only details recorded.  But there is one other record in the right hand column that often also appears and is frequently ignored.  It’s the fee paid by the couple to the priest for the marriage and when the figures are compared to others fees in the register they can frequently be a good indicator of the economic standing of the couple.  So if your ancestors’ fee was waived and an entry of ’0 – 0 – 0′ recorded it can tell you that times were difficult for them at that time.

 

 

Research Tip of the Week! 10-9-2014.

This weeks Research Tip of the week is written by Enecann Research Expert, Carmel Gilbride

carmel gilbride

Family history concerns itself with mapping people to places. We need to be familiar with the places where events in our ancestors lives may have taken place. One of our ‘go to’ sources for this information is the work of Brian Mitchell, including hisGuide to the Parishes of Ireland. Guide to the graveyards and parishes in Ireland  and the new edition of hisAtlas

These publications are an invaluable source for family historians.  The simple numbering of parishes, of all denominations, within counties can signal  to us to the scale of our task. At a glance we can see, for example, how many Presbyterian congregations there may be in a given civil parish. We are then alerted to the extent of our possible search.

As graveyards are a constant source of interest for family historians, Mitchell’s listings of graveyards by denomination within counties , together with Ordinance Survey reference, can really help to pinpoint a likely place of burial for our ancestors,

Latest Eneclann Newsletter: 11th July 2014

Eneclann Newsletter
In this issue:

The Truth behind George Clooney’s Irish Family History.

UCC Genealogy School is a hit

20×20 talks this summer

The Genealogy event Limerick.

World War one Roadshow

Brian Mitchell,Tracing Derry-Londonderry roots.

Experts Workshops for CPD conclude for the Summer

Chapelizod Art project update

Research tip of the week


 

 

Dear Eneclann customer,

Fiona Fitzsimons Discovers the truth behind George Clooney’s Irish Family History

Using newly available records on www.findmypast.ie renowned genealogist Fiona Fitzsimons discovered Clooney’s Irish ancestors didn’t jump, but were pushed.Clooney’s Irish ancestors were small farmers from Windgap, co. Kilkenny.  In the 1850s  local farmers competed for land.
This sometimes tipped-over into violence.  New evidence proves that in 1852 Nicholas Clooney (George’s great x 2 grandfather) was violently assaulted. Months later he was harrased through the court system.

“In 1852 Nicholas Clooney suffered a real injustice. He decided shortly after to leave Ireland and settle in Kentucky.  “The rest is history.” Says Fiona, Research showed that Nicholas’s widowed mother (George Clooney’s great x3 grandmother) remained behind in Ireland.
“Now through a family connection and for the first time, we have photographs of the old Clooney house and farm taken in the 1930s, 40s and 50s.  The photos show a way of life now vanished.  It’s closer in time, and probably also in terms of experience, to the life of the immigrant Clooneys.”

Read the full story here
https://flipflashpages.uniflip.com/3/71043/333233/pub/html5.html#

You can listen to Fiona’s interview on Morning IrelandRTÉ Radio 1 and the truth behind the research by clicking below.

 


UCC Irish Genealogy Summer School is a hit!

Eneclann Genealogy experts Fiona Fitzsimons and Brian Donovan both spoke at the UCC Irish Genealogy Summer School last week.”Ancestral Connections is going from strength to strength.
Eneclann provides core lectures and Brian Donovan and Fiona Fitzsimons bring academic excellence to genealogical practice-based frameworks”by Lorna Moloney.Booking for the 2015 Summer School will open on 24th July, later this month.

See thewebsite  for more.


 Lunch time talks in the National Library of Ireland

This August at theNational Library of Ireland,Eneclann andAncestor Network will host a feast for family history fans! It’s the return of the Twentyx20 lunch-time talks. Each talk is a short introduction to a key area, source or research method in Irish family history. The Q&A session will give you direct access to the experts.

Read more about these talks In this months edition of Irish Lives Remembered here :https://flipflashpages.uniflip.com/3/71043/333233/pub/html5.html

 


The Genealogy Event Limerick

2014 recognises Limerick as the “City of Culture” and the 3rd weekend in August sees the beginning of National Heritage Week
so what better way to celebrate both than with,

The Genealogy Event!
This two day event promises to be a real humdinger!

Information sessions on a broad range of Irish genealogy topics will be given by some of the top experts in the industry. The Eneclann duo, Fiona Fitzsimons and Brian Donovan will also be there :)

“The event has been set up to help genealogists and family historians at all levels and bring together people from around the world with Irish roots,” says BBNY Group founder, Bridget Bray.

Introductory and advanced sessions will focus on surname origins, genetics and genealogy, civil, church and military records.
For those who really want to dig deep, there are expert sessions on the Registry of Deeds, and Irish sources for children in care 1840s to 1990s.
The U.S.National Archives (NARA) will also make a rare appearance in Ireland, to introduce the use of U.S. immigration and Naturalization records.

 

In addition toEneclann, expert speakers at the event will include Tony Browne (local historian), Paul Cotter (surnames expert) Eileen O’ Duill (Civil rights expert), Lorna Moloney (U.C.C Genealogy Summer School & Merriman Research) and Paddy Waldron (Limerick/Clare Expert). Organisations present will include IARC, the LDS, NARA and Roots Ireland.The event has many experts who will be on hand to offer guidance and advice.

This two day event will take place inThe Strand Hotel, Limerick, Buy your ticket today and experience “The Genealogy Event 2014″

 

For more information on

The Genealogy Event
visit them onFacebook Or theirWebsite.

 


World War One Roadshow at Trinity College Dublin

Trinity College Dublin in partnership withRTÉ Radio One and theNational Library of Ireland is hosting a Family History Collections Day of World War One memorabilia this Saturday, July 12th where members of the public are invited to bring in family items, letters and mementos related to the war for authentication and archiving by a team of experts,

Paul Manzor fromEneclann and Aoife O’ Connor from findmypast  will be there to provide research advice and guide you through the records of ancestors that served in World War 1

findmypast will provide free access throughout the day to all their World War 1 records.
Don’t forget to pop over to both our stands and say hello!

It looks like it’s going to be one very eventful day.  For more information and a full time-table of the day, click on the image.

 


Brian Mitchell publishes new book

Tracing Derry-Londonderry roots.

‘Londonderry’ sketch by John Nixon circa 1790

Brian Mitchell, the best-selling author of A New Genealogical Atlas of Ireland, has a new book out, for anyone tracing their family history in the city and county of Derry/ Londonderry.Tracing Derry~Londonderry Roots was published in the U.S. earlier this year.

“Genealogy has great potential to reconnect Derry with its Diaspora and as a promotional tool to potential visitors and tour groups”, says Brian Mitchell.
“Just recently I was communicating by email with Jim O’Reilly of Chicago who is one of 700 direct descendants of Charles Curran who emigrated from Brockagh (2 miles south of Eglinton), via Derry, to USA in 1865. This June they are holding a family reunion in Pittsburgh; the seed has been sown to visit Derry and their ancestral home in the future”  Brian Mitchell,

Contact him at (genealogy@derrycity.gov.uk),

Brian’s book is now available to buyhere


Expert workshops for CPD conclude for the summer.

This last week the Expert workshops series concluded for the summer, with two workshops on genetic genealogy given by Dr. Gerard Corcoran.
The series of Expert workshops for Continuous Professional Development began in April 2014.

Already we’ve held ten workshops, drawing on the expertise of our own GAS membership, as well as overseas speakers including Dr. Liz Rushen (Colonial Duchesses, Fair Game).

Monthly Workshops are held in Trinity College and the National Library of Ireland, both institutions with which Eneclann has a close association.

These free workshops are open to our own GAS membership, but also to other professional genealogists, enthusiasts and independent scholars.

We’re taking the month of August off, but the series will resume in September.

“Maeve and I would like to thank all our speakers who generously gave their time, energy and expertise.
We’ve had a lot of fun in these first few months, and have built up a regular audience.
We hope you’ve enjoyed the workshops as much as we have, and hope to see you again this Autumn”
Fiona Fitzsimons.

“The CPD talks have been tremendously interesting and the workshop format has prompted a worthwhile discussion among attendees”
Maeve Mullin

“The Expert Workshops are well worth the journey from Limerick. We have all tapped into new resources with the different speakers”
Kay Caball

 

 


Chapelizod Art Project update

 

Debbie Chapman is keen to involve the two local schools in theChapelizod Art Project.
She has already completed a workshop with the children of St. Patrick’s National School.
This Monday Debbie will hold a free workshop with the children of St. Laurence’s National School.
Chapelizod Bandroom,11am -12 pm, Monday 14th July.

DRAWING DAY  (all ages)  – Sat 19 July 2014, 2  – 5pm Meet at the Square in Chapelizod Village.  Bring materials or some will be provided. Most suitable drawings will be chosen for inclusion in
the Exhibition  & Project Book in Sept/Oct 2014.

PHOTOGRAPHY  (all ages)  – email your photos of Chapelizod’s ‘Dereliction’ to info@debbiechapman.com by August 31st.
Most suitable ones will be chosen by local photographer Motoko
Fujita for inclusion in the Exhibition  & Project Book in Sept/Oct 2014.

POETRY  (all ages)  – email your poetry or prose compositions to   info@debbiechapman.com for inclusion in the Exhibition  & Project
Book in Sept/Oct 2014.

Check out all the latest updates on the project over on theChapelizod Dereliction facebook page


Research tip of the week

A quirk of registration

If you can’t find a record of birth in your family’s usual parish of residence, it may be because your ancestors gave birth away from home.Traditionally, many women returned to their mother’s house for assistance when they had their first child. The child may then be registered in their mother’s home parish, rather than the family’s usual place of residence.  Another common instance in which a woman gave birth ‘away’ from home, was if she attended the county hospital.The county hospitals shared a campus with the workhouse, and from the 1850s many poor women used it as a ‘lying-in’ hospital. You can make this ‘quirk of registration’ work for you, by searching the baptismal registers of the parish, and from 1864 civil births by the Registrar’s District in which the workhouse campus was situated.

By Research Expert, Fiona Fitzsimons,

 


—————————————————
Best wishes, The Eneclann Team

Browse our ShopBrowse our ShopBrowse our Shop