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News Digest

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  • Catholic parish registers in Ireland from 1740′s on now published online:

http://www.irishcentral.com/roots/genealogy/Genealogical-treasure-trove-as-Catholic-parish-register-published-online.html

  • Chicago May: The Irish queen of crooks:

http://www.irishcentral.com/roots/Chicago-May-The-Irish-queen-of-crooks.html

  • Celebration of Irish who built the world’s major cities comes to New York and Chicago (VIDEO):

http://www.irishcentral.com/culture/community/Celebration-of-Irish-who-built-the-worlds-major-cities-comes-to-New-York-and-Chicago-VIDEO.html

  • Rare 1880s photo captures Achill women breaking stones:

http://www.irishtimes.com/culture/heritage/rare-1880s-photo-captures-achill-women-breaking-stones-1.2273031

  • A century of Irish history goes online in posters, pamphlets and diaries:

http://www.irishcentral.com/roots/history/A-century-of-Irish-history-goes-online-in-posters-pamphlets-and-diaries-PHOTOS.html

  • Release of listing of 2,558 veterans of Easter Week 1916 with recognised military service. The list of names and addresses can be downloaded:

http://www.militaryarchives.ie/collections/online-collections/military-service-pensions-collection/news-and-updates/single-view/article/release-of-listing-of-2558-veterans-of-easter-week-1916-with-recognised-military-service?cHash=6d7ae63c1ea12f65a8f5b9422a246d03

  • The best medieval statue in Ireland is 8ft tall and in a ruined church in Kilkenny:

http://www.thejournal.ie/heritage-ireland-kilkenny-2153658-Jun2015/?utm_source=shortlink

31st of January 2014,Latest Eneclann Newsletter

In the latest edition of Eneclann’s newsletter we fill you in on some recent events in Irish genealogy. The new series of Expert Workshops for Continuous Professional Development returns in 2015; Learn the truth behind George Clooney’s Irish Roots as told by Eneclann’s own Fiona Fitzsimons interviewed recently on Midlands Radio ; We share a lovely testimonial from Ray Judge who commissioned our expert researchers to work their magic on his family history; Listen to the latest podcast from Lorna Moloney’s Genealogy Radio Show; and of course our readers’ “favourite bit” – the Research tip of the week; Enjoy :)

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The Expert Workshops Return

The Expert Workshops for CPD return in 2015. This year, Fiona Fitzsimons of Eneclann is joined by John Hamrock of Ancestor Network, to develop a new and diverse range of workshops for professional family historians and independent scholars. In February, our first speaker is,Catriona Crowe speaking on the National Archive’s publication plans in 2015,Our second workshop takes place on Valentine’s Day.  Mary Chaill will give a special presentation on IT for professional genealogists in the National Library of Ireland. Read all you need to know about these talks here.

 

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RootsTech 2015

There’s less than 2 weeks to,RootsTech 2015 conference in Salt Lake City, Utah, February 12-14, 2015. The Eneclann contingent are looking forward to Roots Tech.  Come and meet Brian Donovan, Paul Manzor and Laura Carroll, at Stand 1342.  And ask them about some of,the exciting new projects we’re working onnewsletter bar

George Clooney hits the headlines again!

Will Faulkner recently interviewed Fiona Fitzsimons on,Midlands103′sToday Show and asked her some hard questions about George Clooney’s Irish ancestry.
Listen to what Fiona had to say about the evidence, and the story it tells us. If you’re partial to Mr. Clooney, read all about his Irish Family History,here.newsletter bar

              Testimonials

We have so many wonderful clients here at,Eneclann.  Good feedback from you, really makes our day, and makes the researchers’ job all the more worthwhile.  Here’s a testimonial email we received from a,recent client, If you would like to read some amazing stories from previous clients of ours you can view them all on our,website.newsletter bar

The Genealogy Radio Show

Tune in to the most recent episode’s of Lorna Moloney’s,Genealogy Radio Show”, broadcast on Community Radio Corca Baiscinn,Listen to  Episode 1- Series 2 Trade Directories,‘Your Ancestors did What? and  Episode 2, Series 2,Marriage and Burial customs, Folklore in practice – Sean O’Duillnewsletter bar

Research Tip of the week

“The research tip this week is by Helen Moss, Eneclann’s senior researcher.
Helen is one of the most able family-history researchers in Ireland, and heads up the Eneclann research team, read her,Tip of the week here.newsletter bar

18th of January 2015, Latest Eneclann Newsletter.

Welcome back and happy 2015. In the latest Eneclann newsletter we let you in on some exciting new events coming up this year for Eneclann. We have the latest edition of Irish Lives Remembered featuring part 2 of the story of Princess Charlene of Monaco’s Irish roots, and an intriguing royal link to QE2!  We bring you the real truth behind George Clooney’s Irish Roots, and our readers’ “favourite bit” – the Research tip of the week. We have the first news of events in 2015, where you can meet the Eneclann experts at home and abroad; And, if you still want more, we have an article on “Workhouses and Direct Provision”, published in The Journal. Enjoy :)

newsletter divider on blogThe Truth about George Clooneys Irish Roots

george clooneyEneclann feature’s in today’s,Sunday Independent with an article on Hollywood star George Clooney and his Irish Roots, The article gathers information from research discovered by Eneclann’s very own Expert researcher Fiona Fitzsimons, You can also read the full story on his Kilkenny homestead in,Irish Lives Remembered, Read all you,need to know here.

 

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Fiona’s trip to Saltlake City

Earlier this month Fiona visited Salt Lake City, Utah for work. She was there to attend a board meeting of the Association of Professional Genealogists (APG), and stayed on for the APG’s annual Professional Management Conference. Read how Fiona got on here.

 

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Teaching Irish Family History in Salt Lake City

The British Institute has invited Eneclann’s own Fiona Fitzsimons to teach the Irish Track in its’ prestigious course, next September in Salt Lake City, Utah. In the recent edition of British Connections magazine, Fiona wrote about what she hoped to impart to all those signing up to her course. “My main goal will be to help my students to “navigate” the tumult of Irish history” Read the full article .

 

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Irish Lives Remembered

The January/February edition of ,Irish Lives Remembered Genealogy e-Magazine is now out, There’s some fabulous feature articles in this latest issue, but we’re most interested in the story of Princess Charlene of Monaco’s Irish roots.  Princess Charlene has an intriguing connection to the English Queen Elizabeth II.  Go to page 26 and,read this wonderful story.

 

 

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RootsTech 2015

Eneclann are heading to,RootsTech 2015 conference, The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) will also hold its 2015 National Conference in conjunction with,RootsTech  in Salt Lake City, Utah, February 12-14, 2015,Read all about it here.

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Probate Genealogy.

Eneclann and,Heirsireland, Ireland’s two leading probate genealogy firms, have combined to provide a comprehensive genealogical service to the Irish legal profession. With over 60 years combined experience on legal, title and probate research, which includes: Completing research, Identifying rightful heirs, Preparing required documentation and more,Read about The Irish Probate Genealogy Partners services here.

 

 

 

newsletter barWorkhouses and Direct Provision.

Eneclann’s own Fiona Fitzsimons recently published an article in the online magazine The Journal, in which she compared the hated workhouse system in the 19th Century and the current system of Direct Provision in today’s Ireland.  The article developed out of the Expert Workshop series held last year.  Fiona drew on the research of Dr. Gerard Moran, who gave the September workshop in the National Library (2014),Read the full story here,and tell us what do you think ?

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Irish Genealogy Summer School

 

The UCC Genealogy Summer School is back in 2015.  The School will include some of the leading experts working in their field, and will include over 42 lectures, field-trips, and other optional visits,Read all about it here.

 

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The Genealogy Radio Show.

Tune in to the most recent episode of Lorna Moloney’s “The Genealogy Radio Show”, broadcast on Community Radio Corca Baiscinn. Listen here to Episode 16: ‘Nicholas Rynne – Michael McTeigue, Champion of the world from Kilnamona.

 

 

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Research Tip of the week

This week our research-tip is written by Carmel Gilbride, who ponders on the use of,‘negative findings’ in research.

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Latest Eneclann Newsletter December 13th

In this week’s newsletter we offer you more from Eneclann, and all that is going on in the world of Irish Family History this festive season. We include a little reminder about the Eneclann EII (Employment and Investment Incentive) Scheme 2014; Eneclann’s own Fiona Fitzsimons recently made the September edition of the APG Quarterly; we bring you up to speed with the latest podcast from Lorna Moloney’s Genealogy radio-show; and our research team have a Research Tip of the Week. Plus there’s so much more to enjoy :)

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Christmas Gift Certificatesgold

Are you still trying to figure out what to get that person who has everything this Christmas? A family history gift-certificate is a personal and memorable present for that special someone. It is unique to the person you give it to and their family. This year, give your loved one the gift of working with the experts who discovered Obama and Tom Cruise’s Irish family history, Click on the image to purchase yours today.

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APG Quarterly

Eneclann’s own Fiona Fitzsimons made the September edition of the APG Quarterly – “TheProfessional’s Voice.”The APG Quarterly is a journal for those interested in professionalism. It’s one of the many benefits you receive on joining the Association of Professional Genealogists. Click on the image to learn more. newsletter bar Eneclann Winter Sale.WINTER SALE IMAGE

On December 26th,Just when you think you have received all your Christmas presents, Eneclann will be offering you the best one yet, In the form of our BIG WINTER SALE! and the best part is you don’t even have to leave your couch to receive it, because we all know how hard that is after a day of indulging ;)   So don’t forget to save the date and get ready for 50% OFF all publications, More info to come nearer the sale. newsletter bar

EII Remindertom-cruise - Copy

 

A gentle reminder about this year’s Employment and Investment Incentive Scheme (EII). The Employment and Investment Incentive Scheme (EII) is one of the only remaining ways in which Irish investors can reduce their 2014 tax liability. Eneclann EII is very attractive for investors, as it focuses on what has been recognised as a key component of Ireland’s economic recovery – our heritage,View here,for all you need to knownewsletter bar

Add Virtual PMC to Your Holiday Wish List

Refresh your professional skills with the Association of Professional Genealogists (APG) Professional Management Conference, this January 2015. With individual sessions beginning at just $20, a special $45 DNA bundle, or access to the full virtual conference for $145, Virtual PMC is a gift that fits every budget. Let your friends and family know which classes you want to attend,read more here.

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Give History Ireland as a Gift

Are you a little lost on what gift to get that History lover in your life? How about a subscription to History Ireland, Ireland’s best History Magazine.Remember someone special and give 12 months of fascinating, lively and compelling discussion, reflection and insight into matters of our past that remain significant for today.Check out the,full details here.newsletter bar

final fairy Image Irish Fairies seek new homes for Christmas

We still have some of our ‘little folk’ looking for new homes this Christmas, The parents of St.Laurence’s National School in Chapelizod, want to find homes for the ‘Sidhe na Nollaig’ – Christmas Fairies. Help an Irish fairy find a new home this Christmas! All proceeds go to St. Laurence’s National School.Click here to purchase. newsletter bar

Findmypast Christmas Countdown is live!

fmp Findmypast are delighted to announce the launch of their first ever Christmas Countdown! They have lined up a host of festive treats, from history quizzes and prize draws to guest columns, historical recipes, and expert family history tips. Click on the image to check it out. newsletter bar g radio show

Genealogy Radio Show:episode 14

You could light the Christmas lights along Grafton Street with the energy and verve of our good friend and colleague Lorna Moloney! Tune in to the most recent episode of “The Genealogy Radio Show”, broadcast on Community Radio Corca Baiscinn,Listen here to Episode 14,WW1 soldiers with Marian Furlong and Ann Marie Coghlan.newsletter bar last delivery dates christmas 2014

Christmas Delivery Dates

Don’t leave it too late! Have you been meaning to purchase some online publications with Eneclann before Christmas, to keep you entertained over the holidays? Perhaps you intended to buy a loved one a consultation with an Eneclann expert? Click on the image to find out more on the last delivery dates. newsletter bar research tip of the week

Research Tip of the week

Each newsletter we offer you a research tip written by one of our expert researcher’s, in the hope that we can help you along your genealogy path. This week Stephen Peirce has written a research tip on Researching Families,which you can view herenewsletter divider on blog

Research Tip of the week.

Each newsletter we offer you a research tip written by one of our expert researcher’s, in the hope that we can somehow help along your genealogy path. This week Stephen Peirce has written a research tip on….

Researching Families.

When researching families we often use evidence from civil certificates to guide our searches. In particular townland addresses are of use to avoid doppelgangers where a name is common.

However, addresses can sometimes be more instructive on certain documents than others. For instance, a series of birth certificates for the issue of marriage can offer an indication of how long a family were resident in an area. If five children were born in the same townland over a 10 year period, it is a safe bet that the family were resident in that townland for those 10 years.

Therefore, even if you’re only interested in a direct ancestor, often obtaining birth certificates for older or young siblings can be useful if you’re experiencing difficulties in locating a family outside of the birth of an ancestor.

One to be wary of however is residence at time of marriage. Time and again we see instances where the residence recorded for individuals, particularly men, is just that, their residence when they married, rather than actually their place of origin. In particular be wary when dealing with potentially ‘nomadic’ professions, such as ancestors that may have worked as labourers on the railroad.

A good rule of thumb if you believe the recorded townland may not be the place of origin is to turn to a census (if the event is between 1880 and 1930), census substitute (if the event is before 1880) or best of all the Cancelled Books, and see if the surname is in that townland. If there’s no sign of the surname, this may be an indication that you need to broaden your search.

 

By Stephen Peirce,

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Latest Eneclann Newsletter: 15th/11/2014

In this week’s newsletter we offer you more from Eneclann, and all that is going on in the world of Irish Family history. We include Eneclann’s story of Princess Charlene of Monaco’s Irish Family History, as featured in the latest Irish Lives Remembered Genealogy Magazine. This week we conclude the expert workshops for CPD for 2014 with a focus on church of Ireland records. Lorna Maloney Genealogy Radio show is now available on podcast, and we have that very popular research tip of the week, contributed by Carmel Gilbride. Enjoy

newsletter divider on blogChapelizod Dereliction Exhibition.

On Thursday 6th of November The Chapelizod Derieliction exhibition was officially opened by Minister Simon Harris. The exhibition now runs from 10am-5pm,Thur-Sun until 23rd November 2014. It is the culmination of a nine-month community arts project led by Irish artist Debbie Chapman. The project was funded by Dublin City Council, the Ballyfermot/Chapelizod Partnership and supporting historical research was provided by Eneclann, You can find all the details on this amazing exhibition here.

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The Expert Workshops in Irish Family History series conclude this November on Saturday 15th at 2pm with Derek Neilson on a workshop entitled:“Church of Ireland records – extent, quirks and pitfalls”’ Read the full details here.

 

 

 

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Irish Lives Remembered

The latest version of Irish Lives Remembered Genealogy Magazine is now out, and this month features the work of Eneclann’s own Fiona Fitzsimons on Princess Charlene of Monaco’s Irish Family History. This is the first part of a 3 part story, go to page 8 to read this wonderful story.

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Princess Charlene’s Irish Roots

The newsletter of the Certificate of Irish Heritage also focuses on Princess Charlene’s Irish Roots, to go behind the scenes in the palace in Monaco read the full article here.

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Genealogy Radio Show: episode 11

 

Our friend and colleague Lorna Moloney has really settled into her stride on “The Genealogy Radio Show”, broadcast  on Community Radio Corca Baiscinn. Listen to episode 11 with Criostoir MacCarthaig, Senior Archivist UCD on ‘Digitisng the 1937 [folklore] school scheme’, available here.

 

 

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The Carmichaol Centre Talk

On Saturday 22nd November at 4.00pm Stoneybatter & Smithfield People’s History Project are hosting a public talk that will take place  in the Carmichael Centre, North Brunswick Street (beside the old Richmond Hospital). Read all the details here

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Research Tip of the week

Each newsletter we offer you a research tip written by one of our expert researcher’s, in the hope that we can help you along your genealogy path.This week Eneclann’s Carmel Gilbride writes.Click here to view the tip.

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Research Tip of the week: 15th November 2014

Each newsletter we offer you a research tip written by one of our expert researcher’s, in the hope that we can somehow help along your genealogy path. This week Carmel Gilbride has written a research tip on.

Family History Research and what trends to be aware of

carmel gilbride

Each family is unique in its decisions and history. We see this over and over again in our work here at Eneclann. Nonetheless, as family historians we need to be mindful of the wider patterns at play.

Knowing the general trends of say, population movement, helps us deduce certain probabilities from these facts and guide us to making informed choices when selecting records online.  Working as we do in a post digitisation age, online records are selected, often without regard to the wider context.  We see a  record that matches some of our criteria and before we know it, we have ‘our ‘ ancestor, let’s just call her Mary “No Name”,  in a UK census; then back in Ireland having a child during the Great Famine;moving again to another part of the UK ; and returning to die in Ireland. In reality, it is very unlikely that this Mary “No Name” recorded in all these records is one and the same person. At all times our research needs to look for corroborative evidence from different sources while at the same time being mindful to locate our family in the wider narrative of history.

By Carmel Gilbride.

 

Research Tip of the week, 31st – October 2015.

Each newsletter we offer you a research tip written by one of our expert researcher’s, in the hope that we can somehow help along your genealogy path. This week Fiona Fitzsimons has written a research tip on British Armed Forces Army Records.

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British Armed Forces

Army records

The most complete online collection of historic British Armed Service Records from 1760 to the present is available on www.findmypast.com

Some of the most important collections relevant to Irish family history include:

  • Chelsea Pensioners British Army service records 1760-1913 (WO97)
  • Royal Hospital, Chelsea: pensioners’ discharge documents 1760-1887 (WO121)
  • Royal Hospital, Chelsea: pensioners’ discharge documents, foreign regiments 1816-1817 (WO122)
  • Royal Hospital, Chelsea: documents of soldiers awarded deferred pensions 1838-1896 (WO131)

The difference between Chelsea Pensioners and Kilmainham Pensioners, was that Kilmanham Pensioners ‘lived-in’. The Royal Hospital in Chelsea administered pensions for Irish soldiers living in their own homes in England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales. If your Irish ancestor enlisted in the British Army, but returned home to Ireland after completing his term of duty, you are likely to find him in the Chelsea Pensioners records.

Research Tip of the Week.

This week’s research tip is written by Research Expert Helen Moss

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We often come across people researching their ancestors who are disappointed with the lack of details in mid-19th century marriage registers.  In Roman Catholic marriage registers the name of the bride and groom, their witnesses and sometimes a townland were the only details recorded.  But there is one other record in the right hand column that often also appears and is frequently ignored.  It’s the fee paid by the couple to the priest for the marriage and when the figures are compared to others fees in the register they can frequently be a good indicator of the economic standing of the couple.  So if your ancestors’ fee was waived and an entry of ’0 – 0 – 0′ recorded it can tell you that times were difficult for them at that time.

 

 

Research Tip of the Week 26/9/2014

This weeks Research Tip is written by Enecann Research Expert, Fiona Fitzsimons

Fiona_Fitzsimons

As co-ordinator of the Twentyx20 genealogy talks in the NLI this summer, I had the enjoyable task of attending all the lunch-time talks, and meeting each of the speakers.  One of the talks that really stood out for me, was by Damian Shiels who spoke on the Irish in the American Civil War.

The Irish that fought in the American Civil War were mainly the Famine Irish that settled in the United States between ca. 1845 and 1861.

IT’s possible to trace these men using online records.

The Compiled Military Service Records (C.M.S.R.) are soldiers’ service records, collated from contemporary documents, more than a generation after the war ended,.  These are essentially abstracts of evidence taken from original documents including enlistment, muster and pay-rolls; death notices, hospital and prison registers; descriptive accounts/ service narratives.  These records survive for soldiers of the Union and the Confederate Army, for each regiment in which they served.

Records of Union soldiers were compiled from 1886; records of the Confederate soldiers from 1903. There are more than double the number of records, than there were soldiers, so scrutinise all matching records for a typo in a name, or a change of regiment.

An index to the Compiled Military Service Records is available free online.  It provides a basic index – name, rank, unit and State – by which you may identify individual service records on microfilm

https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1910717

The [Civil War] Soldiers and Sailors (CWSS) data-base is currently under construction.  On completion this will be a portal-site for the history of the American Civil War, and will include records of battles and military units, burial records in the National Cemeteries, Prisoners and Medals of Honour.

http://www.nps.gov/civilwar/soldiers-and-sailors-database.htm

I shuddered when I read NARA’s archival description of the Compiled Military Service Records. “The abstracts were so carefully prepared that it is rarely necessary to consult the original muster rolls and other records from which they were made.” One of the few constants in any field of human endeavour, be it stamp-collecting or maths-physics, is the possibility of h human error.  Where you can’t find a soldier examine the printed lists of both armies, edited by Janet B. Hewett

  •  The Roster of Union Soldiers, 1861-1865, 33 vols.
  • The Roster of Confederate Soldiers, 1861-1865, 16 vols.

 

The best guide to this fascinating subject is Damian Shiels’ book The Irish in the American Civil War, published in 2013 by History Press.]

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