Tag Archives: Brian Donovan

Latest Eneclann Newsletter

Eneclann News- October 10th 2014

In this week’s newsletter we offer you more from Eneclann and what’s going on in the world of Irish family history. Recent events include radio interviews with Fiona Fitzsimons, and an interview with Paul Manzor, Eneclann’s publications manager on the subject of Digitisation. We look forward to the next Expert Workshop in Family History at the National Library (11 Oct.); and to the Back to our past show in the RDS (17, 18, 19 Oct.) Our research tip this week is by acclaimed genealogist Helen Moss

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The History Show

Last Sunday (5th Oct.) Fiona Fitzsimons was a guest on Myles Dungan’sHistory Show on RTE1. The topic of discussion was on the new release of the Pensions Applications forms for service during the Irish Revolutionary Period 1913-23. “Pension applications usually contain the greatest amount of genealogical information, of all military records.This is because pensions can be claimed by family dependents – widows, aged parents, minor children, and sometimes also dependent siblings” Fiona also emphasised the improved search function of the Pensions Data base, that hugely increases the user’s ability to drill down into the records. In particular, the drop-down menus that allow to search by organisation, eg: Cumann na mBan, Connaught Rangers, etc.Listen here to the interview as Fiona encourages a good browse across the records.

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Back to our past 2014

Back to our past is right around the corner, and of course Eneclann will be exhibiting – at stand 30, 30a, 31 and 31a. Come and meet our team of expert researchers, ready to help you with your family history research. Eneclann’s own Brian Donovan and Fiona Fitzsimons will give talks on Friday and Saturday.  On Sunday our guest speaker will be internationally renowned genealogist, Eileen O’Duill.  We will be joined at our stand by Mary Choppa fromTIARA (The Irish Ancestral Research Association), to provide an ‘American perspective’ on Irish immigrants to the U.S.Click here for more information.

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Digitisation and Publications at Eneclann

Since 1998 Eneclann has been at the forefront of digital publishing for Irish genealogy and history.  We started with CD-ROMs, before moving to online delivery, and more recently digital downloads.  Now Eneclann’s Publishing Manager, Paul Manzor, has written an  article to give you a better understanding ofwhere we’re at with Digitisation and publications.

newsletter bar      Expert Workshops

The Expert Workshops in Irish Family History series resumed in September with a double bill on emigration from the Poor Law Unions, by Kay Caball in Trinity College, and Dr. Gerard Moran in the National Library. In October, we continue this Saturday (11 Oct.) with Claire Bradley speaking on ‘Crowd-sourcing’ in the National Library.Read all about the it here.

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Great Great Great Family Tree’s

Tony Hennessy has launched his new websiteGreat Great Great Family Treesand you can check it out on hisfacebook page. If you are looking to get your family tree created and personalised, but don’t know where to start then this is the place for you.

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The Genealogy Radio Show

Our friend and colleague Lorna Moloney has a new radio show“The Genealogy Radio Show” on Community Radio Corca Baisciinn.Each week she looks at a different aspect of Irish family history live.  Listen to a podcast of her recent interview withEneclann’s Fiona Fitzsimons speaking on tracing records of children: ‘Painless facts: do they exist in genealogy?  Find thefull interview here.

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Research tip of the week

Each newsletter we offer you a research tip written by one of our expert researcher’s, in the hope that we can somehow help you along your genealogy path. This week Helen Moss has written a research tip on “researching mid-19th century marriage registers.”

You can read thefull research tip here

research tip of the week

 

Are Smart Cities Making Us Dumb ?

Friday the 26th, at 6pm as part of Discover Research,

The Innovation Academy

 will host Innovation Café,

there will be a moderated discussion panel with academics such as our very own Brian Donovan director of Eneclann.

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The topic under discussion is “Are Smart Cities Making Us Dumb?” all are welcome,

find out more by clicking the link below

http://www.innovationacademy.ie/are-smart-cities-making-us-dumb-innovation-cafe-discussion

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Twentyx20 talks reviews

The following is a review of the first 10 Twentyx20 talks at the National Library of Ireland this Summer, our very first guest speaker was Eneclann Director Brian Donovan and he was followed by some of the top experts in the world of genealogy. Below you can read a short review on each talk.

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1. Brian Donovan:

              The digital revolution in Irish family history.


Since 2003, over 120 million Irish historic-records have been digitised and published online. Of these, 75 million were digitised by Eneclann and findmypast in projects led by Brian Donovan.  Brian is uniquely placed to provide an overview of the digital revolution in Irish family history.IMG_8395

Online publishing has improved access to the records; democratised research by taking it from the hands of a few professionals; and transformed family history into a popular hobby with a mass audience.

Brian also discussed how Eneclann – a small Irish company, has blazed a trail in placing Irish cultural heritage online, in partnership with the cultural institutions.

“Genealogy is more than just names and dates, it is our family story”.

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2. Patrick Comerford:

Hatch, match and beyond: finding trails and tails in parish records.

In a delightfully witty and wise talk, Patrick Comerford informed us there’s more to parish records than registers.  Parish records tell us more about our religious identity and social conditions in the past. the records also show that Ireland was a pluralist society before Ne Temere.rev p

Family history has become main-stream because in the modern world, we use it to construct our own personal identity.

For anyone who missed Patrick’s talk on Tuesday, but who would like to hear more of his ideas on family history, see

http://www.patrickcomerford.com/search/label/Family%20History

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3. Brian Mitchell

Shipping records and their usefulness when searching for your ancestors.

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From the 1700s the main ports of embarcation for Irish immigrants were Dublin, Belfast and Londonderry.  Cork only gained importance as a passenger port in the 1800s.

The Province of Ulster saw particularly heavy emigration from the start.  Between 1717 and 1776, 250,000 Irish left to settle in the British colonies in North America.

The government in Ireland and Britain was mainly hostile to emigration because they didn’t want to loose skilled tradesmen and craftsmen.  Despite this, there are no official registers of passengers leaving Irish ports before 1890, except for the lists of emigrants 1803-06, in the Hardwicke Papers, British Library.

Some records do however survive.  Lists of passengers were compiled by the Masters of the passenger ships, and sworn before the Commissioner in the Port of departure.  A duplicate of the oaths was sent to Dublin.  The survival of passenger lists and shipping records to the present day varies enormously.

“There was an imaginary line that stretched from Sligo on the west coast to Dublin on the east coast.  If you lived north of this line you emigrated from Derry, south and you embarked at Queenstown (Cobh).”

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4. Lorna Moloney

The genealogy of Gaelic Clans: sources, records and evidence – 11th to 17th Centuries.

Genealogy defined the political landscape in medieval Ireland, and was propaganda  by and for the ruling families. The earliest genealogies written down, were recorded in the twelfth century but date from centuries earlier.

By comparing genealogies with the contemporary records, it’s possible to document the rise and fall of dynasties and clans over time.Lorna blog image

Lorna discussed some of the main sources for tracing Gaelic families including Duald McFirbise’s Great Book of Irish Genealogies; the Irish Annals; and records of the Dublin government – the Calendar of State Papers Ireland, the Fiants, and the various land surveys taken in the 1650s and 60s, when the Gaelic political system finally ended.

 “Ireland as a colony was forgotten as a kingdom.”

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5. Aoife O’Connor

Yesterday’s children: discover your ancestors’ childhood.

Aoife O’Connor  gave a thought-provoking talk, on where to find children in the historic records.

Children are civilians too, and the first place to look is in the usual records used for family history: civil records of births and deaths, church records of baptism and burial, and census records.

The National School system in Ireland began in 1837, and the largest collection of school registers is held in the National Archives of Ireland, currently digitising these records with findmypast.ie

In the past, children entered the world of work at an earlier age – some as early as eight or nine years, the majority from the age of 12 or 13.  It’s possible to find records of children in occupational records.aoife's blog image

The National Library of Ireland has photographic collections that show images of childhood in Ireland.  Collections by private and commercial photographers show the middle-classes and the wealthy.  There are some images of childhood in rural Ireland among the photographic collection of the Congested Districts Board.

Records of children also survive for institutions.  Often the first point of contact with any institution, was through the court system.  The Petty Sessions records have many cases in which children are involved, from building an ice-slide and raiding orchards, to the darker side of childhood poverty with instances of children up before the courts for vagrancy or burglary.

She concluded with institutional records of orphanages, reformatory and industrial schools, and prisons.

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6. Paul McCotter, N.I.I Cork

Researching the history of Irish Surnames and clan-names

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Speaking from his own notes, without the aid of overheads, Paul McCotter delivered a bravura performance, at what was one of the best attended talks.

It’s generally accepted by most historians that clan names have an early origin in Ireland, but surnames were only ‘laid-down’ from the 10th Century onwards.  Ireland was probably the earliest of all European countries to adopt surnames.  Yet we still don’t have a full picture on how surnames and clan-names developed over time here.

The starting point for most researchers is the work of Edward McLysaght, a former Chief Herald of Ireland.  MacLysaght’s work though authoritative contains errors.  Individual medieval historians – and here Paul gave an honourable mention to Kenneth Nicholls –  will occasionally research how names may evolve over time, but even then it’s usually as an aside to their main research work.

Paul explained the influence of languages spoken in Irish regions in the last millennium, and how they contributed to the evolution of surnames.  Before the conquest, Irish was the main language.  After the Conquest, the political elite families spoke French, but many of the settlers that followed their political leaders to Ireland spoke Welsh, Flemish and an early form of English [Anglo-Saxon?].  Some colonists adopted the practice of Irish patronyms, and later many Irish adopted English versions of their name, to ‘conform to English civility.’  Paul demonstrated serious scholarly credentials, reeling off examples to show how an original name could evolve over centuries, sometimes changing beyond recognition.

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7. Else Churchill, Society of Genealogists,

The exile of Erin, researching the poor Irish in Victorian London

else blogElsa Churchill demonstrated a deep knowledge of her sources, and an absolute mastery of her subject – finding the Irish poor in London in the 1800s.

Emigration from Ireland to England and Wales probably reached it’s high-point in the first half of the 19th Century, specifically 1815 to 1851.  There were a number of reasons why migration between Ireland and the rest of the United Kingdom picked up at this time.  The conclusion of the Napoleanic Wars led to an agricultural depression, just as many ex-servicemen attempted to return to civilian life and work; the progression of the industrial revolution, and large-scale engineering projects, led to a higher demand for Irish labour; a growth in steam-shipping between Ireland and England made travel cheaper and more easy to avail of; changes to the Poor Laws adversely affected the Irish poor, who could be removed from England or Wales to an Irish port; and, the Irish people fled the Famine via communication lines that linked them to England and Wales.

By 1851 the Irish born population of England and Wales was 520,000 or 2.9% of the population.  The Irish settled almost exclusively in cities, where they could find jobs.  The greatest concentration of Irish settlement was in London, followed by Liverpool, and then Manchester/ Salford.

Elsa identified the communication lines that brought the Irish into London, and how these shaped the ‘Irish colonies’ – pockets of Irish settlement in the city and suburbs.

She discussed the historic sources of central government (Parliamentary reports); local government (Poor Law Unions) and of the RC church (parish registers); where they can be found; and what information they hold that can be used to trace Irish families.

“[In the early 1800s] The Irish were severely affected in the transition years from the old to the new Poor Laws.”

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8. Audrey Collins, National Archives U.K,

Under-used Irish records in the National Archives in England

Audrey opened her talk with a challenging question – the National Archives of ‘where exactly?’ British identity has changed through the centuries, and very many records of Irish people can be found in TNA. She broadly classified these as specific Irish records series, and general series that contained Irish records, for example Military Service records; other Service records such as the Royal Navy, Airforce and Merchant Navy records; Home Office; Probate; migration records; and Census records.

Specific Irish records series such as the records of the Royal Irish Constabulary, the Reproductive Loan Funds, the Irish Sailors and Soldiers Land Trust, Irish Outrage papers and the Dublin Castle records, ended up in TNA for a variety of reasons but essentially because the  Irish records were part of central government activity.

The TNA has risen to meet it’s public service remit by digitising many records sets and making them available online through digital downloads, and also in collaboration with commercial partners like findmypast and Ancestry.

Audrey’s talk was delivered with a delicious deadpan sense of humour that produced some of the best belly-laughs of the entire season from our regular audience.  A gem

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9. Hilary McDonagh, Ancestor Network,

Genealogy and sporting records-from sporting Laurels to Family Trees.

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Hilary considered the connection between family history and sport.  Almost everyone has ‘done’ sport at some time during their lives, but we don’t often consider sporting records as relevant to research.

Sports-clubs generate records: administrative records including Committee Minute Books; Membership Registers; the club’s Financial records including dues paid, or not, or larger debts around club maintenance or kit; Fixture lists and results/ score-books; programmes and other publications; as well as newspaper cuttings.

Hilary briefly considered some of the challenges in persuading clubs that these records are intrinsically useful, and to either create archives or deposit their records in archival collections.  In the former category, she cited the examples of the G.A.A., the F.A.I. and the I.R.F.U.

In the latter category, she discussed the Dublin City Sports Archive collections in the Gilbert Library, of fairly recent origins.  In a hilarious aside, she recounted her own experience in preparing a commemorative publication and subsequently archiving the records of the ‘Maids of the Mountain’ Hockey Club

Hilary concluded with a call to arms: to the public to recognise the importance of sporting records, the clubs to be more proactive, and the cultural institutions to widen their definition of popular culture.

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10. Jacinta Prunty, N.U.I Maynooth,

Did you come from Dublin dear ? understanding Dublin city through maps

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Development of Dublin city over 1000 years in maps.  Dublin has always been unusually well documented in maps and surveys.  Even the earlier medieval history of the city has been surveyed in retrospect by its’ historians and archaeologists, who have re-created maps and scale models of the city from Viking times and the time of the Conquest.

Jacinta’s basic premise was that maps are a key source with which we can ‘open-up’ the history of people and places at any given time.  Researchers can use maps to understand how a village, town or city developed; how a town may be connected to other places by its’ proximity to the sea or rivers; how villages, towns and cities often develop close to fords/ crossings, which may later become the sites of bridges and harbours.

Maps display change over time: in the early 1600s for example the city of Dublin began to develop beyond the limits of its’ medieval walls; or how the status of a neighbourhood can change over time – for example Henrietta Street build from the 1720s as townhouses for the elite, was by the early 1900s a tenement.

Jacinta directed the audience to explore some of the maps she showed on screen, which are widely available in hard-copy or online.

The Down Survey Maps 1650s http://downsurvey.tcd.ie/down-survey-maps.php

The Ordnance Survey Maps from 1837 http://www.osi.ie/Home.aspx

In hard copy, Irish Historic Towns Atlas series http://www.ria.ie/research/ihta.aspx

Jacinta Prunty is an engaging speaker, who has the lucky knack of making her audience feel smarter just by listening.

“The where always matters in family history.”

 

 

 

 

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Book Review: ‘Finding Your Irish Ancestors in New York City’ by Joe Buggy

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This book is the first by relative newcomer Joe Buggy. I say relative because I had the pleasure of meeting him and hearing first-hand the early fruits of his labours two years ago. It was a revelation to me then, and the end result, neatly packed into 165 pages, is a wonderful addition to the arsenal of those Americans trying to trace their Irish roots. Joe’s aim is both simple and ambitious and summed up eloquently in his opening paragraph.

“The aim of this book is to present a comprehensive overview for anyone wishing to trace their Irish ancestors within the five boroughs of New York City” and specifically to help find their place of origin in Ireland. For anyone who has ever tried to research their Irish ancestry this is the number one aim, and a challenge that has left many enthusiasts stumped. Americans are driven to despair by this seemingly impossible task.

Certainly Irish research has become much easier as a result of the digital revolution in access to Irish archives, especially those available throughfindmypast.com and other commercial and free websites. But it’s of little assistance to those who have no idea even what county their ancestor came from in Ireland.

Into this breach steps Joe, ready with concrete steps to deal with the problem in NYC. He starts by describing the vital records created by the city, state and federal government, including BMDs, census, naturalizations, wills, employment, crime, cemeteries and more. But that’s just the start, he describes a huge number of record collections, publications and web resources in detail, with helpful hints on how to use them, and what you’re likely to find. He gives a great chronological account of settlement patterns of the Irish in the city, and the way people from certain counties would congregate in specific districts and wards.

His methodology section is strong, emphasising the importance of researching an entire family within the context of their broader community and network. This is so important in unlocking intractable problems, and his advice is relevant to everywhere in the USA, not just NYC.

His treatment of the records of the Roman Catholic Church is very extensive, comprising a third of the book. He gives a comprehensive list of parishes, register start dates, websites and important notes. He is right to focus on these records, as they are not available online, or in most cases on microfilm. They are rich with critical information about the lives of the Catholic Irish community which made up a large majority of the Irish in New York City. Many registers recorded details of place of origin, or gave information about parents still resident in Ireland.

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I have a few minor quibbles regarding this otherwise excellent guide. I would suggest that the next edition should include the records of the Episcopalian and other protestant churches. By 1841 nearly 40% of the Irish population were non-catholic. This section of the Irish population declined rapidly during the 19th century precisely due to emigration. Probably the greatest number of non-catholic Irish immigrated to the USA but they assimilated more quickly with mainstream America because of their religious affiliation and language. If this is true for the 19th Century, it cannot be over-emphasised for all Irish immigration to New York before 1800. This is another area where further work could be done, but where fewer records survive. These criticisms shouldn’t detract from the book which remains an essential guide for all thoseBook tracing the Irish in New York City.

So is this the final word on the subject? Of course not. Even Joe doesn’t claim that. There are dozens of small county associations, Irish centres and support groups, trade unions, radical and conservative political organisations some of which are mentioned, but with only sparse details given. Their records are at serious risk, if they haven’t been lost already. The sad truth is that “Irish-America” is disappearing, and with it the organisations that sustained the links, as well as their records. As a consequence Joe’s book is even more important in bringing attention to the importance of these records in the story of the Irish.

By Brian Donovan

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You can purchase “Finding Your Irish Ancestors in Newyork City” by Joe Buggy here

The Celtic Connections Conference 2014

Eneclann’s very own Brian Donovan heads state side for the Celtic Connections conference this August!

This August the 15th and 16th our very own expert Brian Donovan will be heading to the Celtic Connections Conference in Waltham, Massachusetts to join all the leading experts in genealogy from near and far, Brian will be speaking on the following topics:

Usingfindmypast.com to Trace your Irish Family History.

Murderer, rebels and Drunkards: Your Irish ancestors and the Law.

This two day event will include 20+ lecturers and 26 presentations by well-known experts in their respective fields, such as:

John Grenham
Eileen Ó Dúill
Sean Ó Dúill
Kyle Betit
 Dwight Radford
Donna Moughty
Bill Budde

   and many more!

Go towww.celtic-connections.org now for all you need to know on this great event.

Latest Eneclann Newsletter 25th July 2014

Eneclann Newsletter
In this issue:

Celtic Connections Conference 2014.

The Genealogy event Limerick.

Lunch time talks in the National Library.

Free Genealogy advisory service 2014.

Research Tip of  the week.

Carmel Gilbride unlocks the past for passengers


 

 

The Latest Eneclann Newsletter………

The Celtic Connections Conference 2014

 

Eneclann’s very own Brian Donovan heads state side for the Celtic Connections conference this August!

This August the 15th and 16th our very own expert Brian Donovan will be heading to the Celtic Connections Conference in Waltham, Massachusetts to join all the leading experts in genealogy from near and far, Brian will be speaking on the following topics:

Usingfindmypast.com to Trace your Irish Family History.

Murderer, rebels and Drunkards: Your Irish ancestors and the Law.

This two day event will include 20+ lecturers and 26 presentations by well-known experts in their respective fields.

such as:
John Grenham
Eileen Ó Dúill
Sean Ó Dúill
Kyle Betit
 Dwight Radford
Donna Moughty
Bill Budde
and many more!

Go towww.celtic-connections.org now for all you need to know on this great event.


The Genealogy Event Limerick

The countdown is on to The Genealogy Event in Limerick with only 5 weeks to go, If you are planning a trip to Ireland or a trip to Limerick then The Genealogy Event is one not to be missed, It will take place on the 22nd and 23rd of August, The two day event will bring you presentations by the experts in genealogy along with other social events that will help attendees meet one another in relaxed settings.

 Dont forget to look out for our very own Eneclann duo, Fiona Fitzsimons and Brian Donovan who will also be there to give their expert advise 😉

Phone: +353 61 331549

Email:info@bbnygroup.com

Web:www.thegenealogyevent.com

Tickets may be purchased online via thebuy tickets here button or

contacting Event Partner, the Irish Ancestry Research Centre on +353 61 207 114

 


Lunch Time talks in the National Library

This August at theNational Library of Ireland,Eneclann andAncestor Network will host a feast for family history fans! It’s the return of the Twentyx20 lunch-time talks.Each talk is a short introduction to a key area, source or research method in Irish family history. The Q&A session will give you direct access to the experts.


Free Genealogy advisory service in the National Library of Ireland 2014

The joint consortium ofEneclannandAncestorNetworkare providing a wide and comprehensive range of expertise in The National Library of Ireland all summer to anyone looking for help and advice in tracing their family history,

The service is free to all visitors to the Library.

9.30 a.m. to 4.45 p.m. Monday to Friday,

9.30 a.m. to 12.45 on Saturday.

See you there!


Eneclann helps Unlock the Past for Cruise ship Passengers

This morning in theNational Library of Ireland,
Eneclann research expert Carmel Gilbride, gave a talk on migration to Australia to the cruise ship passengers ofUnlock the Past cruises, Carmel also shared her expert advise and answered questions and queries that the Australian passengers had regarding their Irish Family history, the cruise ship passengers used the library to seek out all the information they wanted through out the morning and with the help of Carmel they hopefully unravelled some mysteries.


Research Tip of the week

It may be that we think we have mined everything we can about our families from the 1901 and 1911 Census. But a few recent searches have had me re evaluate this idea.

It can be so difficult to select the correct family when the name is one that proliferates. It seems, at the outset to be impossible.
But along the way, we may establish a county of birth and that can narrow down our search.

Then we may learn an occupation and this can be really key in selecting the correct record.  But, even at that point, – given the proliferation of labourers in Ireland’s economy of the opening decades of the 20th century – we can be still be faced with a choice.Great care is needed at this point to ensure we do not dismiss records from our search.

We might expect to find, the pairing of say a husband and wife, the parents of children we have found. But, we should be mindful of the fact that one or other parent may have died and remarried. Pay particular attention, in the 1911 Census, to the number of years married.

If the wife indicates that she has been married for ten years, yet there are persons listed as children as the head of household who are older than ten, then you have to dig deeper.

The children {of whatever age} are correctly enumerated as the offspring of the head of household. But these children are not necessarily the children
of his wife.
If you are very fortunate, the second marriage of this head of household may be civilly registered, where his first marriage was not. In this way, you may be able to bring a family back, through following the clues in the census, to an earlier generation.

Carmel Gilbride,
Research Expert,

 

 


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Best wishes, The Eneclann Team

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Latest Eneclann Newsletter: 1st of July 2014

Eneclann Newsletter

In this issue:

UCC Genealogy Q&A with Stuart Rosenblatt

The Genealogy Event 2014

Expert workshop with Dr. Gerard Corcoran

Chapelizod dereliction project with Debbie Chapman

Latest downloads at Eneclann

Kindred Lines by Fiona Fitzsimons

Research Tip of the week


Dear Eneclann customer,

Stuart Rosenblatt and the UCC Genealogy School

Ancestral Connections 2014 is an International Genealogy summer school developed by Lorna Moloney at ACE – University College Cork, it offers a programme of outstanding quality for those interested in tracing their Irish roots. All aspects of subjects are covered by a series of presentations and ‘hands on’ workshops given by a selection of Ireland’s leading genealogical lecturers and experts.Eneclann’s very own directors Fiona Fitzsimons & Brian Donovan will also be giving talks at the Summer school.

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Brian Donovan: Tuesday 1st July at >

2pm: ‘Usingfindmypast.ie

 for family history research: court prison land records and more’

Fiona Fitzsimons: Tuesday 1st July at >

3pm: ‘Online sources for Irish family history research and how to use them’

4pm:  ‘Tracing records of children in care 1840s to 1990s.’

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This week we caught up with Stuart Rosenblatt of theIrish Jewish Genealogical societywho will  be giving a talk atThe UCC Genealogy School .


Stuarts’ talk will be on:

Hidden Irish Jewish Records.

   Thursday the 3rd of July at 2pm-2.45pm.


The Genealogy Event 2014

2014 recognises Limerick as the “City of Culture” and the 3rd weekend in August starts the “National Heritage Week”  and what better way to celebrate both than with,


This two day event promises to share with you, information sessions on a broad range of Irish genealogy-related topics from some of the top experts in the industry, including Eneclann’s very own Research Experts Fiona Fitzsimons and Brian Donovan,

“The event has been set up to help genealogists and family historians at all levels and bring together people from around the world with Irish roots,” says BBNY Group founder, Bridget Bray.

Sessions will focus on civil and church records, immigration and passenger lists, military records, surname origins, using DNA, and resources available at Ireland’s National Library and National Archives.

In addition toEneclann, experts from Limerick Genealogy, Roots Ireland, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and the Irish Ancestry Research Centre (IARC),will be on hand to offer guidance and advice.

The Genealogy event has added a new conference session in partnership with the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA).
It’s of particular interest to anyone engaged in ‘reverse genealogy’ and trying to trace the descendants of ancestral relatives that left Ireland and settled overseas.
Dorothy Dougherty, Programme director of the National Archives in New York City will be speaking about U.S. naturalisation records, Irish Famine records, and other key sources held by NARA.

This two day event will take place inThe Strand Hotel Co. Limerick, Buy your ticket today and experience “The Genealogy Event 2014″

buy tickets here The Genealogy Event 2014

For more information visit them on theirFacebookOr theirWebsite.


Expert workshops continue in Irish family history

In association withTrinity College DublinandThe National Library of Ireland

Our speaker for the month of July will be Dr. Gerard Corcoran, Irish representative for theInternational Society of Genetic Genealogy.

Gerard has been involved in genetic genealogy for many years and has agreed to give two workshops on differing aspects of this fascinating subject.

 

The workshops will take place next week (beginning 30th June).

3pm on Thursday 3rd July, in Room 4050A on level 4, in the Arts Block, Trinity College Dublin, and

2pm on Saturday 5th July, in the Trustee’s Room, National Library of Ireland, Kildare St.

Genetic genealogy provides a glimmer of hope for our diaspora who are unsure of where in Ireland their ancestors came from.

Description:

Trinity workshop:
Using genetic genealogy to break down the brick walls of traditional genealogy.

National Library workshop.

Connecting the Irish Diaspora using Genetic Genealogy

All workshops are free, but as spaces are limited, these are ticketed events.

Anyone who would like to attend this free workshop should apply for a ticket by writing toworkshop@localhost
Tickets will be assigned on a first come basis.

Please let us know whether you will be at the Trinity College or the NLI event

Thanks, and hope to see you all there.


Chapelizod artist, Debbie Chapman

 

CHAPELIZOD DERELICTION

 

Debbie Chapman is a Chapelizod artist, and is running a project that will be exploring the issue of dereliction in Chapelizod, and the fact that so many buildings have been left empty and derelict, even while there’s a housing crisis.

 

Eneclann is providing historical research on who’s lived in the village of Chapelizod in the last 150 years.This is a Community Based Arts Project responding to the large number of derelict buildings in Chapelizod Village, Dublin and it’s environs. Debbie will be drawing on the real stories of past lives as the inspiration for her art.Recently, Dublin council bought a derelict site with ruined houses from the early 1700s, to redevelop.
The council has put a hoarding up outside these houses, and Debbie Chapman has been asked to design and paint the hoarding.

The purpose of this project is to explore the impact of decline and deterioration of historic buildings at the centre of Chapelizod’s village and through shared artistic practice create a strong sense of place within the current community.

The intended outputs of the project are to create artistic interventions instilled with community consciousness and deliver a series of community arts events, which will have a positive impact on local people, affected by the decline in their immediate environment.

Large wooden cut-outs with painted images from the past will be attached to the hoarding.

The project will culminate in a collaborative Visual Arts Exhibition to be held in the village accompanied by a Project Book and a Public Art Installation in Sept/Oct 2014.

The project, is led by artist Debbie Chapman, and is funded by Dublin City Council, Ballyfermot/Chapelizod Partnership and Eneclann.

We will provide you with regular updates over the summer, to track the project’s progress which we will feature in our newsletters and also on ourwebsite blog.


Latest downloads available at Eneclann

We now have 11 new download releases available on our website.

 

11 new download conversions available, for as little as€8.10,including

You can view and purchase all of our 11 latest download releases over on our website

justclick hereto have a look.

 


History Ireland Magazine, “Kindred Lines”

Check out Fiona Fitzsimons’ column, Kindred Lines in the July/August 2014 edition ofHistory Ireland.

This month Fiona writes about what records survive to trace your ancestors involved in WWI

“Irish involvement in the First World War is contentious, and historians cannot agree on either the numbers of Irish engaged in the conflict, or the number of Irish war dead. Official estimates are 210,000 mobilised and 49,300 dead, but these figures are open to challenge.

 


Research Tip of the Week!

Most researchers tracing an Irish WWI ancestor will start with the Army Service Records, the largest of all the British Services.
Less than half of all service records actually survive, because of archival destruction during the London Blitz in 1940/41.

From the original 6 ½ million+ service records, only 3 million now survive.
There are however several other sources that can help you bridge this gap in the British Army Service records.

Everyone who served overseas was entitled to the British and Victory (Campaign) medals. A lesser number of people also received awards for gallantry or distinguished service.

The National Archives U.K. has over 5 million records for British Army Medal index cards 1914-1920.

The medal cards include the recipient’s name, service number, rank and unit and are available online athttp://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/records/medal-index-cards-ww1.htm

In addition to the traditional British Armed Services the medal cards include women’s services, the Indian Army, and some civilians.

By Eneclann Research Expert, Fiona Fitzsimons,

 

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Best wishes, The Eneclann Team

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Latest Eneclann Newsletter: 9th of June 2014

Eneclann Newsletter
In this issue:

Eneclann and Ancestor Network make it a hat trick.

Family History research winner.

UCC Genealogy Q&A with Nicola Morris.

Expert workshop with Noel Jenkins.

Research Tip of the week with Carmel Gilbride.


 

 

Dear Eneclann customer,

Eneclann and Ancestor Network make it a hat trick!

 

Free genealogy advisory service in the National Library of Ireland, Summer 2014.

National Museum of Ireland 300x225 Eneclann & Ancestor Network make it a hat trick!

 

The joint consortium ofEneclann andAncestor Network are delighted to announce that they will return to theNational Library of Ireland this summer following a competitive tendering process.

Speaking on behalf of the National Library of Ireland, Honora Faul said today:

“We are delighted to welcome back Eneclann & Ancestor Network, to support and enhance our summer genealogy service. It’s an invaluable service for anyone tracing their family history.”

Fiona Fitzsimons,Eneclann:
Eneclann Logo 300x94 Eneclann & Ancestor Network make it a hat trick!

“In Summer 2012 and 2013 we saw a significant rise in the numbers that availed of the genealogy service.We hope to welcome a record number of visitors to the library this summer”

Hilary Mc Donagh founder and director ofIrish Ancestry

ancestor network logo 300x108 Eneclann & Ancestor Network make it a hat trick!

“We are delighted to be part of this wonderful role for a third year running. It’s a privilege for us to assist visitors to the Library and to help them trace their family history.

Being part of the Library’s genealogy service allows us to share our expertise, it also means we come face to face with the ordinary Joe or Josephine, and learn what they are most interested in. We love to team up with our friends in Eneclann: both organisations can work together to help the public with all their research needs”

www.ancestornetwork.ie
1 Hyde Park Avenue, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland
Tel: +353 (0)87 0505296

Summer hours for the genealogy advisory service in the National Library of Ireland commences Tuesday 2nd June 2014.

nli logo Eneclann & Ancestor Network make it a hat trick!

The service is free to all visitors to the Library.

9.30 a.m. to 4.45 p.m. Monday to Friday,

9.30 a.m. to 12.45 on Saturday.


Family History Research Winner!

Last month’s winner of“Ireland of the Welcomes” Magazine competition prize, afamily history research andpublicationspackage worth over €1000 provided byEneclann, was a Mr John Egan from the city of Humble in Texas.

We caught up with John to ask him how he felt about winning this research prize with us, his response was one of great excitement and we are delighted to have such a worthy winner.

 

How did you feel when you found out you had won the competition from the Ireland of the welcomes magazine?

“I was very happy to find out I had won the services of such a professional team like Eneclann.

One of my cousins has done some research and developed a family tree starting back with the birth of Michael Egan, born 1824 in Marystown so I know there must be so much more to find out.

Winning this was just perfect. It will be wonderful to have an expert update of our family history. I am very excited, but also so curious to see what might be found in the research, it will also be interesting to see if this research will provide me with the sufficient information to obtain an Irish citizenship and passport. I have always really wanted to know my ancestry and now, with confidence, will have it fully documented by the experts at Eneclann”


Nicola Morris and UCC Genealogy School.

Ancestral Connections 2014 is an International Genealogy summer school developed by Lorna Moloney at ACE – University College Cork, it offers a programme of outstanding quality for those interested in tracing their Irish roots.

All aspects of subjects are covered by a series of presentations and ‘hands on’ workshops given by a selection of Ireland’s leading genealogical lecturers and experts.

Eneclann’s very own directors Fiona Fitzsimons & Brian Donovan will also be giving talks at the Summer school

Fiona Fitzsimons: Tuesday 1st July at 2pm-2.35pm:

“Online sources for Irish family history research and how to use them”

Brian Donovan: Tuesday 1st July at 4pm-5pm:

“Usingfindmypast.ie for family history reseacrh: court prison, land records and more”

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This week we caught up with Director of  Timeline Research Ltd,Nicola Morris  who will  be giving two talks  atThe UCC Genealogy School.

Nicola Morris will be giving two talks on

Thursday the 3rd of July

 

11.15pm -12.00pm“Irish Newspapers, a source for Genealogical research”

12.00-12.45pm“Irish Estate papers as a source for Genealogical research”


Have a lookhere at the line up for this amazing summer school


Continuous Professional Development in Irish Family History

We continue the series of expert workshops withNoel Jenkins on the

“Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) Records from 1654 to present day”

Venue: The Religious Society of Friends (Quaker) Library and Archive in Stocking Lane, Rathfarnham.

Time: 10a.m to 4p.m.
Date: Tuesday 24th June.

Noel is the most genial of genealogists, and we’re delighted that he has agreed to deliver a workshop on the Quaker records, combined with a behind-the-scenes tour of the library and archive.

Noel has a thorough knowledge of the Religious Society of Friends records, and prepared the archival catalogue in 2012 with the curator Christopher Moriarty.

Noel operates a professional research service, and can be contacted by emailwnoel@eircom.net

Since 2010 he has assisted visitors to the Quaker Archive with their research, and in 2012 and 2013 provided the genealogy advisory service in the National Library and National Archives of Ireland.

Noel was one of the research team behind the hit TV programme, The Genealogy Roadshow broadcast in 2014.

Description

Title: Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) Records from 1654 to present day.

The Quakers have been in Ireland since 1654. In this workshop Noel Jenkins provides an introduction to their records and beliefs, and discusses other records that have been generated from these original documents. In particular, those records that document their involvement in and contribution to Irish society. Of particular interest are the records of the Liberty Creche opened in 1830; the Claremount Institute opened in 1824; Cork Penny Dinners; Bloomfield Hospital, and the Quaker schools around Ireland.

The workshop concludes with a tour of the Library and Strong Room including viewing Quaker memorabilia.

There will be 6 computers available to explore the Mega Database, which includes an overview of everything in the building.
We will provide tea and coffee at lunchtime, so people are requested to bring some lunch.

Numbers are strictly limited, and anyone who would like to attend this free workshop should apply for a ticket by writing toworkshop@localhost
Tickets will be assigned on a first come basis.


Research Tip of the Week!

 

The availability of the Will Calendars on the website of the National Archive canbe very useful to family researchers.
It may be that you have searched online indexes for a death without success.

It may seem obvious that the person you seek would have died in Ireland so why is their death not in the records of the General Register Office?
When searching the Wills Calendars online, follow one of the golden rules
of genealogy by keeping your search as wide as possible.

Take the example of Sir Thomas Wyse, MP of Waterford.
If you input Wyse, Thomas and put in the county, you will not have any success.
However, if you input Wyse, Thomas, leaving the county blank, you will see that Sir Thomas Wyse, MP, late of the Manor of St John of Waterford, in fact died in Greece, while he was serving as a Minister in Her Majesty’s government.

By narrowing down your search at an early stage, you risk losing the very record you seek.

By, Carmel Gilbride

 


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Best wishes, The Eneclann Team

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Latest Eneclann Newsletter: 26th of May 2014

Eneclann Newsletter
In this issue:

 

  • World War I & Independent.ie
  • GAS Workshop for June.
  • UCC Genealogy School
  • Derry-Londonderry:Gateway to a New World.
  • Database of over 500 directories.
  • Family Tree designs.
  • Research Tip of the week.

 

 

Dear Eneclann customer,

Eneclann talk World War I to Independent.ie

‘Hundreds of thousands of other people in this country have a relative who fought in that “war to end all wars”

As John Meagher fromThe Independent.ie discovers, researchers here atEneclann are hard at work digitising the records of Ireland’s World War I dead. Brian Donovan, Eneclann CEO, talks about how soldiers and civilians of every nationality were slaughtered in their millions.
“They deserve to be remembered”
Independent.ie Interview

‘Virtually every town and village had someone who died in the war’

Read Brians full articles on the Eneclann Blog

Finding records for soldiers and those who were involved in WWI


Continuous Professional Development in Irish Family History

The expert workshops launched in April by Eneclann in partnership with Ancestor Network, are proving very popular. But don’t just take our word for it, here’s some of the feedback we’ve received from those attending:

Phil Stokes, Dublin, attended Jim Ryan’s workshop,

Ghosts of the Estates:

“Great talk, I immediately had information that helped my research”

Michael Rooney, co. Down attended Fiona Fitzsimons’ workshop

Records of Children in Care 1840s to 1990s:

“A comprehensive introduction to records for ‘Lost Children’ …. It explored the challenges that genealogists face when researching in this area as well as offering potential solutions to problems encountered.”

This month our speaker isMaeve Mullin, B.Sc.

with a workshop on
Finding Forgotten Irish WWI Soldiers: a case-study of Glaslough, co. Monaghan.

In this workshop Maeve Mullin uses as a case-study, her own community of Glaslough, county Monaghan, to recover the names and personal histories of locals that fought and died in WWI.

The workshop takes place on two dates:

3pm on Thursday 5th June, in the Emmet Theatre, Arts Block Trinity College, and2pm on Saturday 7th June, in the Trustee’s Room, National Library of Ireland, Kildare St.

Description.
Even as the centenary commemorations for WWI begin, historians still can’t agree on the number of Irish war dead. The official figures  are 49,300, but even these have been challenged as being both too low, and too high.

In this workshop Maeve Mullin will guide you through the maze of sources that document the Irish men and women that fought and died in the First World War.

Using individual stories, Maeve demonstrates how even a ‘burnt’ service record, can retain enough evidence to allow researchers to link up to other related records.

“In researching the WWI soldiers from Glaslough I discovered a wealth of records.  The workshop will focus on how this can be achieved for everyone’s home place.

All workshops are free, but as spaces are limited, these are ticketed events.

To apply for a free ticket, please emailworkshop@localhost and indicate whether you want to attend the workshop taking place in Trinity College or the National Library.

           __________________________________________

Maeve Mullins and The UCC Genealogy School

 

Ancestral Connections 2014 is an International Genealogy summer school developed by Lorna Moloney at ACE – University College Cork, it offers a programme of outstanding quality for those interested in tracing their Irish roots.
All aspects of subjects are covered by a series of presentations and ‘hands on’ workshops given by a selection of Ireland’s leading genealogical lecturers and experts,

This week we caught up with Maeve Mullins who will also be giving a talk at The UCC Genealogy School.

 

Maeve Mullins will be giving a talk on-

Friday the 4th of July: 2.45pm -3.45pm

“Valuation office-A precious Gem”

Have a lookhere at the line up for this amazing summer school.


Derry-Londonderry-Gateway to a New World

 

Derry~Londonderry: Gateway to a New World – The story of emigration from the Foyle by sail and steam has just been published in the US by genealogist and Irish emigration expert Brian Mitchell.

Brian Mitchell recounts the history of departures from the port of Derry-Londonderry from the late 17th century to the year 1939, when the last transatlantic steamer sailed from the port. Derry is ideally situated at head of the River Foyle, twenty-four miles long and only two miles wide at its head, a configuration that provided sailing vessels with a harbor of refuge. During the age of steam, her westerly situation gave her a monetary advantage with coal-burning vessels.

“I would estimate that 6 million Americans can trace their descent to a Scots-Irish ancestor who departed the port of Derry”

published in US on 15 May 2014 by Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore,www.genealogical.com

You can purchase Brians book now for just $11here


Database of over 500 Directories

Shane Wilson andJoe Buggy have recently released aDatabase of over 550 links to Historic Directories of Ireland available on free and subscription websites,it also includes directories for purchase on CD or download. Details shown include directory date, titles byEneclann,findmypast andOrigins.net and a direct link to relevant website. Online directories may be available as transcripts, ebooks (pdf, FlipBook etc), images or searchable databases.

To access the database,click here.

 


The perfect end to your family history research

We have teamed up with Tony Hennessy ofGreat Great Great Family Trees to offer you the perfect finishing touches to your family tree.
AfterEneclann have researched your family tree and created a genealogical report for you or perhaps you have carried out your own genealogical investigations, why not let Tony Hennessy from “Great Great Great Family Trees” turn the findings into a handsome family tree. A simple, functional family tree can provide visual clarity to a densely populated report. A ‘presentation’ type family tree, which is ideal for framing, can be admired, cherished, shared and passed on. It also makes a very thoughtful gift for some one special.

Tell me more about how I get my Family Tree designed by Tony Hennessy


Research Tip of the Week

One of the positive ‘side-effects’ of the digital revolution in family history, is that we expect to find out more about an individual or family than ever before.  Our research-team are frequently asked if it’s ever possible to discover anything about an ancestor’s personality? Like all Irish research, this depends very much on the records that have survived down to the present day.

Anyone lucky enough to have letters or a diary will expect to be able to discern something of the writer’s personality. Even marginal notes in a family bible or scribbled on the back of photos can sometimes communicate your ancestors’ inner thoughts and feelings.

Other sources where you may find flashes of personality include newspaper accounts, particularly where the story covers dramatic events in which an ancestor was an eye-witness, and in the testimony recorded in court records.

Even in the most structured official records, you will occasionally find flashes of personality.

Historically, people have sometimes chosen to settle scores in their last will and testament. The 1775 will of Abraham Hill of Bray county Wicklow, indicates a rather waspish individual.  Hill left his ‘reputed son’ William Hill one British shilling “to show him that he had remembrance that there was such a person.”

Heads of household often make playful remarks in the Census returns. In the 1901 Census of Ireland, Jeremiah Heffernan of Cork recorded the marital status of Madge, his 19 year old daughter, as “on the look-out.”

While the 1911 Census return of the De Valera family may reveal something of their household politics.  Nobody told Sineád, Bean DeValera that she wasn’t joint ‘head of family’ with her husband.  She was joint signatory of the original 1911 Census return, to the obvious horror of the enumerator, who scratched out her name and inserted a ‘correct tick’ beside her husband’s signature.

Sometimes the documents prove that we don’t always see ourselves as others see us. In a recent case that involved the Valuation Office Cancelled Books, I found a comment on the family I was researching, made by the evaluator:

“I never had business to do with such a fighting nasty lot for the hour I was with them could hardly keep them from blood-shedding.  The valuation is as fast [secure] as I could make it”

1884 Valuator Geo. Innes[?],Drumahaire, co. Leitrim, Union of Manorhamilton.

By: Eneclann Research Director, Fiona Fitzsimons.

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Best wishes, The Eneclann Team

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‘Virtually every town and village had someone who died in the war’

independent

As John Meagher from TheIndependent.ie discovers, researchers here atEneclann are hard at work digitising the records of Ireland’s war dead so that they shall never be forgotten, Brian Donovan Eneclann Researcher and Director gives us his take on World War 1 and how “We owe it to these men who died in this war to ensure that their contribution isn’t written out of history” Read the full article here.

Brian Donovan of geanology and research company Eneclann

JOHN MEAGHER – PUBLISHED 10 MAY 2014 02:30 AM

The offices of Eneclann are to be found in a non-descript building on busy Aungier Street inDublin‘s south inner city. Thousands walk by every day and have no idea that it is here that vitally important work to commemorate the Irish men who died in World War I is being conducted.

The genealogy and history research company has been digitising the records of all 49,000 from this island who perished in one of the most savage wars the world has ever seen.

The exhaustive project is being carried out alongside tech giantGoogle and the Belgian World War 1 museum, In Flanders’ Fields, which was named after the famous war poem from Canadian lieutenant colonelJohn McCrae.

Brian Donovan, the historian who established Eneclann with his wife Fiona Fitzsimons in 1998, says the painstaking work has brought home to him the enormous scale of the carnage.

“In one month alone, July 1916, more Irish – some 4,669 people – were killed than during the 40-odd history of the Troubles,” he says. “That is not to diminish the horrors of The Troubles, but it gives a sense of the enormous numbers of Irish men who lost their lives. Could you imagine that number of Irish people dying in a single month in 2014? There would be uproar.”

Spend even a short time with theTrinity College history graduate and one gets the sense of a man who is anxious that Ireland’s war dead be given their due once and for all.

“For too long, their contribution was forgotten about in this country, or swept under the carpet, because it did not fit with the republican narrative,” he says. “And yet, there wasn’t a single family in the aftermath of the war that hadn’t lost a son or knew someone who lost a son.

“Those who did survive returned to an Ireland that was either uninterested in their experience or simply not able to understand just what they had been through. Some faced open hostility due to a perceived notion that they had been unpatriotic. It is only in more recent times that their bravery has finally been acknowledged.”

Brian Donovan’s grandfather was one of an estimated 200,000 Irish men who fought in World War I. “His name was Rickard Donoghue and he survived the conflict. He was a submarine officer and I often think about the cramped, dangerous conditions he would have had to work in. Submarines were so new and crude back then.

“He died in 1952 when he was 54 years old. Like so many Irish men, he was very young in the First World War. You had to grow up quickly back then – it wasn’t uncommon to be a commander on a submarine by the age of 18.”

The tragedy of war is heightened by the fact that it’s predominately slugged out between young men on both sides of the conflict, and World War I was no different. Boys as young as 14 were permitted to join the British army.

“When you analyse the ages of the Irish who died, you’ll see that most were in their 20s but almost one in five were teenagers,” he says. “The youngest Irish soldier to perish was just 15. He was Lance Corporal Charles Brown, who was from my neck of the woods – Ferns in Co Wexford.”

For most of the Irish, the war was fought on land – with many experiencing the attritional nightmare of the trenches in France andBelgium. It is no surprise that the month mentioned by Donovan – July 1916 – coincides with the Somme, still one of the most savage battles in history. And it’s likely that most of those 4,669 Irish soldiers died in the trenches there.

Eneclann – which is an ancient Irish word concerning the price of one’s reputation – used as its source material the eight volumes of a 1923 book, ‘Ireland’s Memorial Records’, which collected the names of all the Irish who were killed in World War 1 and numbers around 3,000 pages.

Commissioned by Field-Marshall Sir John French, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (1919-1922) and honoured by the British as the First Earl of Ypres, the leather-bound volumes were lavishly illustrated by Harry Clarke, who is best known as Ireland’s most significant stained glass artist.

Today, copies are housed in the small book rooms at the National War Memorial Gardens at Islandbridge inDublin and can be viewed by appointment through theOffice of Public Works. The digitisation project from Eneclann, Google and the In Flanders Museum will ensure that the resource can be accessed by all online.

Incidentally, the War Memorial Gardens had been allowed to fall into ruin for much of the 20th century, but have subsequently been beautifully restored. The location was a pivotal stop during the visit ofQueen Elizabeth here in 2011. Its changing fortunes, Donovan believes, has been something of a microcosm about how old perceptions of Irish involvement in the war have faded or been revised.

A newfound appreciation of the Irish contribution to the war effort arrived as late as 2006, with events to mark the 90th anniversary of the Battle of the Somme taking place throughout Ireland. “1916 is obviously a very significant year in Irish history,” Donovan says, “but not just for the events in Dublin that Easter.”

Over the years, Donovan has encountered several erroneous statements concerning World War I passed off as fact – chief among them, the notion that most Irish soldiers were unionists from the northern part of the country. “It used to be said that most of those who died were from what’s nowNorthern Ireland, but that wasn’t the case at all,” he says. “Every single county in Ireland had a significant number of casualties, with places like Cork (2,244 dead) particularly hard hit.”

The data that Eneclann has gathered makes a mockery out of the suggestion that World War I affected northern counties more than southern ones. For example, 1,050 Tipperary men perished in the war, and roughly the same number – 1,059 – were from Tyrone.

To put the scale of those figures into context, the 1911 Census shows that there were 152,000 people residing in Tipperary – and, to extrapolate from that, one in every 76 men from the county were killed on foreign fields between 1914 and 1918.

County Dublin, with 4,918 dead, had the highest number of fatalities after Antrim (which accounts forBelfast – then almost as populous as Dublin city) but even a county as sparsely populated as Leitrim had its own significant death toll too (250).

“Virtually every town and village in Ireland had someone who died,” Donovan says. “Its reach was immense. We owe it to these men to ensure that their contribution isn’t written out of history.

“There will be many significant centenary events commemorated in Ireland this decade – and the 1910s was a remarkably momentous time – but it’s essential that those Irish people who fought, and died, in the Great War are not forgotten.”

It is hoped that the project will be fully digitised by the end of 2014.

 Irish Independent Supplement