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In January 2013 a team of builders discovered a hoard of gold coins beneath the floor of a pub in Main St. Carrick-on-Suir, co. Tipperary. Eamonn P. Kelly investigates.

*http://www.irishartsreview.com/gold-standard/

Recent excavations at Rathfarnham Castle have brought the former inhabitants into focus, prompting Simon Loftus to recall some vivid episodes from the family’s history.

*http://www.irishartsreview.com/from-chaplains-to-lords/

Using Irish burial records and gravestones to trace your ancestors

http://www.irishcentral.com/roots/ancestry/Using-Irish-burial-records-and-gravestones-to-trace-your-ancestors.html

The Representative Church Body Library and their Irish family history records

http://www.irishcentral.com/roots/ancestry/The-Representative-Church-Body-Library-and-their-Irish-family-history-records.html

4,000 women from workhouses in Ireland became Australian pioneers

http://www.irishcentral.com/roots/genealogy/4000-women-from-workhouses-in-Ireland-became-Australian-pioneers-.html

Trace your Dublin ancestors with new records

http://www.irishcentral.com/roots/genealogy/Trace-your-Dublin-ancestors-with-new-records.html

 

Do you want to support an author? Check out the innovative new publishing house,Unbound, to learn how you can choose to support authors, and decide which books are published.

Phyllis Richardson ‘s new book – The House of Fiction – will be especially interesting to readers of this newsletter. In it, she explores the real-life houses that provided the setting for some of the best loved books and films, including Evelyn Waugh’s Brideshead (Brideshead Revisited), Jane Austen’s Pemberley (Pride & Prejudice), and Virginia Woolf’s summer house (To the Lighthouse).

https://unbound.co.uk/books/the-house-of-fiction?mc_cid=d9299db97a&mc_eid=e88345ee2a

 

Mistress Helena Wintour was only six years old when her father, Robert and uncle, Thomas were hung, drawn and quartered in 1606 for their involvement in the gunpowder plot. Her life was subsequently dedicated to Catholicism with embroidery as her daily act of devotion. In a new exhibition, the work of this remarkable woman is displayed for the first time

 http://www.selvedge.org/blog/?p=15213

 

* (Available in The Irish Arts review newsletter)

 

 


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