NEWS DIGEST

 

newsletter

 

  • Irish civil records to be published online, on the Irish Genealogy website.

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/politics/genealogy-website-restores-access-to-records-1.2167965

  • Plans are afoot to create a new Irish Diaspora Centre in Dublin, as a visitor attraction

http://www.irishtimes.com/business/companies/former-coca-cola-chief-in-dublin-to-oversee-plans-for-epic-ireland-at-chq-1.2155120

  • An Irish American’s epic fight to ‘get even’ with Alzheimer’s

http://www.irishcentral.com/news/An-Irish-Americans-epic-fight-to-get-even-with-Alzheimers.html

  • Brian Mitchell writes about a branch of his family tree, and the final voyage of the Lusitania, in the Londonderry Sentinel.

On 7th May 1915  RMS Lusitania was torpedoed by a German U-Boat, 11 miles off Cobh and inside the German-declared ‘zone of war,’ with loss of 1,195 lives, including those of 123 American citizens.
http://www.londonderrysentinel.co.uk/news/local-news/final-voyage-of-the-ill-fated-lusitania-1-6702508

2,400 Scotch American clansmen returned to Glasgow, via Derry!

They stopped off briefly in Derry, which was then a transatlantic hub, to disembark 500 American tourists!!

Anchor Line Express Service

The Anchor Line, from 1866 right through to 1939, operated its ‘American Express Passenger Service’ from Derry to New York. Their liners called at Moville, in the deeper waters of Lough Foyle, some 18 miles downstream from Londonderry, to pick up emigrants who were ferried from Derry in paddle tenders.

In those days Derry (like Shannon and Dublin today) was the hub of a transatlantic tourist trade.

For example, on Thursday 26 July 1928, Anchor Liners Transylvania and Caledonia arrived from New York and Boston within one hour of each other in Lough Foyle, bringing 2,400 Scottish Clansmen from America, destined for Glasgow, and a further party of 500 American tourists who disembarked to begin their holiday ‘to see the scenic beauties of the Emerald Isle.’

The Anchor Line’s tender Seamore ‘left Londonderry for Moville early in the day with a large party of officials, cinema, and Pressmen to meet the liners’ and ‘welcomed the clansmen in true Scottish style to accompaniment of pipes.’ One of the returning Clansmen was a brother of Sir Harry Lauder.

British Pathé video (duration 1 minute 7 seconds, no sound), dated 30 July 1928, survives of the returning ‘Scotch American clansmen’ on board the Caledonia, berthed in Glasgow, with title ‘“To dear old Scotland with my Ain Folk!” – Rousing reception at welcome home to 2,400 Scotch American Clansmen’ at http://www.britishpathe.com/video/to-dear-old-scotland-with-my-ain-folk/query/CROWDS.


This entry was posted in News, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , .